WAFULA OGUTTU: OUR POSITION AS PEOPLE’S GOVERNMENT ON POLITICAL TRANSITION


This is our focus for the immediate future.
After Museveni, we must have an all inclusive Transitional Administration for at least five years within which period, we must among other undertake the following tasks :

1. Review the Constitution.

2. Rebuild and strengthen State institutions and political Parties

3. Heal the country by carrying out truth telling, justice and reconciliation

4. Organize free and fair elections as required by our Constitution.

For the elections, we propose that the three top most leaders, i.e., Head of State and Government, the Deputy President and Prime Minister must agree publicly and sign it off accordingly that they will not contest for any elective public office in the general elections organized by the Transitional Administration.

Wafula Phillip Oguttu,
Minister for the Presidency,
The People’s Government.

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Accepting money/gifts from people and organisations we cover


By Edris Kiggundu

Journalism ethics world over stipulate in BLACK and WHITE that journalists are not supposed to accept any gifts/money/facilitation from the people or organisations that they cover. The genuine fear is that this money/gifts will compromise the journalists who may not be able to deeply scrutinise the activities of these people/organisations.

To a large extent, I agree with this assertion. What defines people is their reputation and for journalists, the standards are higher. You cannot be the one pointing out how corrupt some public officials are,when you are stuffing your pockets with money left, right and centre. Your reputation will take a hit and few people, including the organisations/people that give you money, will take you seriously.

Yet having stated that, we must also place into context the situations under which some journalists accept money or gift from people and organisations they cover. Here, I am being a REALIST not IDEALIST. I once asked a respected senior journalist what, in his view, constituted a bribe from a news source?

After a long pause, the award-winning journalist told me that “you can know that a news source is trying to influence your coverage of a story through offers of money/gifts. It is an instinctive feeling… But there are people/organisations that could give you money out of appreciation for what you have done. That may not constitute bribery.” That was the view of
the senior journalist who us still active and occupies a very senior position in one of the most influential media houses in Uganda. He is also one of my mentors.

In countries like Uganda where you cannot easily divorce journalism practice from the social and political context, the issue of taking/receiving money from people/organisations must be looked at from many angles. Journalists become susceptible to bribes the moment their organisations neglect to facilitate them or pay them well. Many journalists who work for local FM stations in Uganda fall in this category. Some organisations cannot afford to facilitate their journalists to cover basic functions and organisations will step in. Some news organisations simply don’t make money (In the TV Broadcast industry only three TV stations in Uganda turn in a profit). In other cases proprietors of some of these media organisations are only business oriented with little regard for funding journalism. Thirdly, some stories in Uganda cannot be covered without some form of facilitation from the interested organisation/news source. They may involve huge expenses and risks. Take election coverage for instance.

Have I taken money/gifts on some occasions from people or organisations that I have covered? Yes I have. I even pointed this out in one of the posts here last week. I have attended workshops and trainings where per-diem is offered and I have pocketed it. I have also been “appreciated” several times for the stories I have covered by people I know. I have accepted facilitation and taken the ambiguous “transport refund” from FDC, NRM, UPC and DP, including food and refreshments at their functions. I have been facilitated by organisations within and outside Uganda in the course of my work. The UPDF once flew me and other senior journalists to cover floods in Soroti. They in addition “refunded our transport”. The US State Department facilitated me generously to attend a journalism fellowship at the University of Southern California in 2006. I came back with some good money which I never declared to my editors at the The Observer. The UK government/Reuters facilitated me to cover UK elections in 2015. One NGO met my bills for a trip to South Africa in 2011. The Turkish government funded me and other journalist for a benchmarking trip. I have also been handsomely paid as a facilitator by some organisations to train their people in media related matters. I have also given money/gifts to some of the news sources to obviously buy their favour ( I once gave fuel to an MP…a story for another day). This, many media analysts will tell you, is also wrong. One thing I have never done is to extort money/ put someone at gunpoint from a person/news source/organisation under the threat: If you do not give me this..I will do this..” I don’t think these facilitations/appreciations have influenced the way I cover these organisations and people. But this may not be for me to judge. Like I said, in countries like Uganda, the issue of what constitutes bribery is thorny and divides debate. I have seen editors chastise reporters for accepting 20K (a pittance really) as transport refund from an organisation, as they accept gifts and gift hampers worth millions from the same organisations. I have also seen some senior news managers fight juniors for foreign trips funded by private organisations, simply because there is some monetary benefit. I have also seen and witnessed situations were some editors have sat on stories simply because they hit out at people/organisations that regularly fund them. I have seen news organisations drop stories in exchange for adverts from an organisation which is being scrutinised (which I think is a direct form of bribery clothed as a business transaction). The managers are quick to retort that “these are the people who pay your salaries.” In short the practice of accepting money/gifts and other forms of facilitation by journalists and media organisations is rife in Uganda and elsewhere. This is not about to end. In my view individual journalists have the responsibility to exercise sound judgement in situations where they think they are being compromised by a news source/ organisation and act accordingly.

No KB supporter is in prison who is not under the care of Besigye


By Ronald Muhinda, FDC supporter,
No one is in prison who is not under the care of Besigye. He provides with lawyers, supports their families etc. I can assure you that it’s well known where Mugumya Sam and others are, their condition in Ndolo Military Prison and there is direct contact with them for years. They also receive monthly financial support of $500-1,000 to take of their basic needs in prison.

Mugumya and others will be freed without making any compromise with Museveni. Those methods of compromising with Museveni are a preserve of DP members. I am telling you this so you can stop this blackmail against Besigye. What he goes through to keep even your DP members afloat is unimaginable.

In 2016, they were saying Museveni looks at Besigye as very vengeful and therefore will not hand over power him in fear of retribution foe all Museveni has done to him.

So they proposed Museveni can only hand over to Mbabazi or Muntu. No when Museveni didn’t hand over to them, the narrative has changed to Besigye and Museveni are the same.

When journalists came to the rescue of Balaam Barugahara


By Edris Kiggundu of the Observer

*When journalists came to the rescue of Balaam Barugahara*

Political campaigns are some of the most hectic events not only for the candidates but also the hordes of journalists who trail these candidates. Personally, I have covered three presidential campaigns (2006, 2011 and 2016). In 2006 and 2011, I trailed Dr Kizza Besigye for The Observer. In 2016, I covered President Museveni for the same newspaper. In all those campaigns, I moved with the candidates virtually every inch and space of this country. The most eventful campaign for me was that of 2006 when Dr Besigye, fresh from South Africa, took the country by storm. His rallies were ecstatic but were also filled with tension given the kind of challenge he had put up against the incumbent, Yoweri Museveni. Every now and then at his numerous rallies, there would be shouts of “spy, spy” from his supporters especially when they saw unfamiliar faces in the crowd. One day while campaigning in Busoga, my friend Balaam Barugahara was identified as a “Museveni spy” by some FDC youths. Balaam, still largely unknown then, had hitched a ride in the press van with a number of journalists including this columnist. He told us he was a genuine supporter of Dr Besigye and wanted to find ways of promoting him. In fact on several occasions, he tried to seek audience with KB through his aide Sam Mugumya but he had not been successful. So back to that day, a group of youths chased Balaam from a rally, ready to lynch him. He quickly found his way into the Press Van as the angry youth bayed for his blood outside. When he entered the van, Hussein Bogere, a senior journalist from Daily Monitor and I immediately shielded him (Some FDC youth then including the current Makindye East MP, Ibrahim Kasozi, never forgave me for this). As the van made its way from the rally, I practically sat on Balaam until after a safe distance of about 2 KM. Never the person to give up, Balaam returned to the campaign (something I thought was suicidal) and soon, he was manning Besigye’s car with Mugumya. They would guard the car in turns. Today, the fortunes of the two have changed. Mugumya is incarcerated in jail in DR Congo, while Balaam Barugahara, is a budding young millionaire and proud supporter of the NRM. I still don’t believe that back in 2006 Balaam was a Museveni mole. Until up to around 2011, I think he was a genuine Besigye’s supporter but as his business profile grew and realised that to make it bigger you had to be in the good books of government, he made a strategic decision to support NRM, which controls the state coffers. That was entirely his personal choice, which I respect.

JOURNALIST KIGGUNDU’S ASSESSMENT OF BESIGYE


By Edris Kigundu,
Throughout my journalism career, one question I have constantly encountered from colleagues and other people concerns my political inclination. Which political party do you support? I have been asked.
Many people have said I support FDC. Others, have broadly classified me as an opposition supporter. I have also met some opposition supporters and friends who suspect that I support NRM. Once during an internal NRM meeting called to design a media strategy for the 2016 elections, a senior party official was asked “why she often defends Kiggundu” against the charge that he is an FDC supporter.” The senior member, obviously leaked to me this info.

The truth is that having worked for a relatively independent media house for a long time (The Observer), my political views have been shaped largely by what I have seen and covered. I have covered more stories on local politics and its injustices suffered mainly by the opposition (including violent demos). This also means that there are more people on the opposition side that I freely associate with than those on the side of the NRM. This means that I am far from being considered an objective person. I am not because my views are tinted with a certain bias. I however try to be fair. In the opposition I have a soft spot for…some of you have guessed right… Dr Kizza Besigye, the former FDC leader. I have seen him at some of his lowest and highest moments and I have seen many people who have made conclusions about his personality without really understanding him well. I have interviewed him more than 10 times (and he can be a handful for an unprepared journalist). I have also held private conversations with him countless times on a wide range of issues. He is one of the few people I know who reads widely in fact, more than many academics I know. He is very cerebral and very organised in the way he approaches issues. He keeps time to a hilt and will call early to apologise if he cannot make it in time for an appointment. He is also literally a moving ATM machine and has contributed to so many causes (tuition, cars for officials, houses, funded journalists). Being an opposition leader certainly comes with many responsibilities. That said, Besigye is not perfect. He has a million and one weaknesses, like all of us. He can be intolerant to divergent views and I know some party officials who have been on the receiving end of his tirades in internal meetings. Even journalists or media houses he perceives to be critical of him have not been spared either. Then he has the habit of denying, sometimes shockingly, what he has said using the common refrain: “I was quoted out of context.”

I remember the U-turn in 2015 over contesting in the elections and The Nile Post interview when he downplayed Bobi Wine’s presidential chances. Lastly, having “fought” and “sacrificed” heavily for political freedom over the last 20 years, he believes he is entitled to “his territory” will not treat whoever tries to encroach on it lightly. That is my personal reading of his current tension with Bobi Wine. He thinks people should be appreciative of what he has done and accord him the respect he deserves. Overall, I rate Besigye very highly compared to the calibre of politicians we have on either side on the political aisle. He is extremely intelligent and has a high degree of integrity. I think he (and Gen Muntu) could be the most genuine opposition politicians I have encountered in my career. But I am not blind to some of his personal weaknesses (and those of his ardent supporters).

I think President Museveni must be laughing his head off


Bobi Wine


By Edris Kiggundu, The Nile Post Journalist

I have heard supporters of one of the presidential hopefuls echo his call for people to go and register for national IDs ahead of the election. Mbu, this will guarantee that they will vote come 2021 and remove Museveni. I think President Museveni must be laughing his head off. So someone thinks with a mere ID, he can remove Museveni’s government which designed the national ID system, controls the data base and can still change rules of engagement at the last minute? Some of these gullible fellows have never found out why voting materials in parts of Kampala and Wakiso could not be delivered in time at the respective polling stations. The same fellows think one will just flash a national ID in the faces of the polling officials, vote and bang! Museveni will be history. If that is their main election strategy then the son of Kaguta still has many years at the helm of this country without breaking much sweat.

UGANDA’S DISAPPEARED MORAL COMPASS


By Bobby Alcantara
Dr Ugandans,

Have you ever cared to wonder about Uganda’s collapsed moral compass? It seems we now live in a lawless jungle where norms of civiilised behaviour, such as honesty and integrity, and respect for the elders, are now just irritating reminders of a golden age long gone.

Take my example. I am not a rich man, but I try to help people in my village because they are the real family I have, even though I have not seen most of them since I was a teenager. Apart from my own family, I currently help a number of poor people in my village, mainly the elderly and aged or the very sick who have no income. I provide a basic income for them of about £15 per person, per month. I spend £600 of my monthly salary providing for this basic income for the poor in my village.

But last week, I sent some money to an old sister in law- she was married to my eldest brother who died many years ago in a motor accident and her children have since also died, so I support her because she has no other means of survival. She was a bit sick last week, so I sent her £100 ie Shs 490,000. She got the money, but gave it to a young man who was living with her for safe keeping. . He promptly announced the money stolen after only a few hours, and when she rejected his explanations, he beat her up so badly, causing serious injuries.. The poor woman has now left her own home, and is sheltering with my mother for fear of any further attack. In the meantime nobody there would help this woman when she was coming under this sustained, brutal attack by a young man.. Even the so-called police have not intervened as they want a bribe. . It is now left to me, here in London, to look for this thug and get him arrested and prosecuted. I am going to get him, make no mistake about this, but you can understand my disgust.

What has happened to our country? Where is the peaceful and respectful Uganda that I knew gone?

M7’s son will salute any president in Uganda!


Patrick Kamara: Do you think General Muhozi would salute you if you won the 2021 elections?

Hon.Kyagulanyi: The difference between us is that you live in the past while I am working for the future where the military is subordinate to civilian authority

I suppose you know it; in the army there is a code of conduct that compels every member of the force to do what he/she is expected to do. A junior officer will respect the senior, and the simplest of such expectations is greeting, “saluting”.

So if Gen. Muhoosi is a real soldier, he will obediently and professionally do what is expected of him; and he will also know the penalty for doing otherwise, insubordination which can have all sorts of interpretations, which will be very bad for him.

Interestingly enough, a junior who salutes his senior and his greeting not returned, can report the matter to a more senior officer and the erring officer will likely be reprimanded, but they are usually smart – they pretend not to have seen the small man, as they know the repercussions, and the effect on morale of the force.

Gen. Muhoosi will salute any president in Uganda, Kamara whether elected or usurps power, his salute from Gen. Muhoozi is guaranteed!

Peter Simon

PICS : Lovely Air Hostesses Lost In the Ethiopia Airways Plane Crash. May Their Souls Rest In Peace.


PICS : Lovely Air Hostesses Lost In the Ethiopia Airways Plane Crash. May Their Souls Rest In Peace.

PICS : Lovely Air Hostesses Lost In the Ethiopia Airways Plane Crash. May Their Souls Rest In Peace.

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 passenger jet to Nairobi that crashed early on Sunday carried passengers from 33 countries.

The airline said there were no survivors, according to the state broadcaster.

The flight left Bole airport in Addis Ababa at 8.38am local time, before losing contact with the control tower just a few minutes later at 8.44am.

“There are no survivors onboard the flight, which carried passengers from 33 countries,” said state-run Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation, quoting an unidentified source at the airline.

At Nairobi airport, many relatives of passengers were waiting at the gate, with no information from airport authorities.

“We’re just waiting for my mum. We’re just hoping she took a different flight or was delayed. She’s not picking up her phone,” said Wendy Otieno, clutching her phone and weeping.

Robert Mutanda was waiting for his brother-in-law coming from Canada.

“No, we haven’t seen anyone from the airline or the airport,” he told Reuters at 1pm, more than three hours after the flight was lost.

“Nobody has told us anything, we are just standing here hoping for the best.”

DETAILS ABOUT THE BATUTSI & BANYARWANDA IN GENERALAND REFLECT THE CURRENT SITUATION IN UGANDA:


By Dennis Nyondo

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF TUTSI & THE HUTU PEOPLE IN RWANDA:

The Banyarwanda is a general name termed for the people who live in a country called Rwanda, one of the smallest landlocked and most mountainous and most densely populated country in Africa located in the Central Eastern side of Africa. It’s neighbored by Uganda from the North, Tanzania from the East, Burundi from the South and the Democratic republic of Congo from the West.

The size of Rwanda is 10,000 Square miles (25,900 sq.km) which is the size of Maryland or Massachusetts both States in USA with 10,000,000 people prior to the war.
Rwanda has a population of about ten million people with only three ethnic groups, which are:
Batwa- the earliest inhabitant in the country which makes up the smallest group of 1% (1,000,000) of the nation’s population. Physically, they are short (pygmies) and small who live by hunting and gathering wild fruits.
Bahutu- is the largest ethnic group which makes up 85% (7,000,000 million) of the population prior to the war. It was the second to arrive in the present day of Rwanda. They are farmers and belong to the Bantu group of African people. The Hutu tended to have darker complexions and be stockier.
Tutsi-were the last group to settle in that region as they were looking for fertile grazing land for their cattle. They make up 14% (about 2,000,000) of the total population. Tusti warriors led the migration and protected the cattle against raiders. Generally, the Tutsi tended to have lighter complexions and be tall and slender.

Over time, a sort of aristocracy of powerful minority people arose, and eventually became to be known as Tutsi, a word that originally used to refer to someone who owns a lot of cattle. Everyone who was not a Tutsi became a Hutu.
The Hutu and Tutsi live mainly in Rwanda and Burundi with a smaller number of them found in the neighboring countries of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, Tanzania, Europe and America, with the total world population of 14 million people.
The three ethnic groups all lived together in the region for nearly 1000 years ago. They all share the same common social and cultural values including the national language (Kinyarwanda) a Bantu language. Although the Hutu and Tutsi live side by side throughout Rwanda and Burundi, and there has been a great deal of intermarriage between the two groups. The Tutsi play a more prominent role in business and public affairs in the entire region though they are small in number. In addition, both groups practice the Catholic and Protestant versions of the Christian faith. Throughout Rwanda’s history, however, the ethnic labels have been synonymous with social division, and in the 20th Century this division led to discrimination, violence, and political upheavals.

The Hutu and Tutsi who live in countries other than Rwanda and Burundi are mostly refugees who fled due to ethnic persecution. Hutu and Tutsi has been a problem in Rwanda since 1959, and the most recent of 1994 whose roots of the tragic can be found in the history and culture of the Tutsi and Hutu.

In early Rwanda, court historians handed down stories selected by the Tutsi royalty. In some cases, the stories were biased or based on myths that had been created by the Tutsis support their dominance Therefore, many stories that were considered “official” Rwandan history asserted the notion that the Tutsis were supreme and they had been chosen by the gods to rule.

One ancient Rwandan myth tells the story of Gihanga, the first Rwandan, who fell from heaven with three sons- Gahutu, Gatwa and Gatutsi. According to the story, Gihanga was to choose which son would succeed him. To find out who was the most worthy, he tested them. Each son was given a pot of milk to watch over during the night. When the morning came, Gihanga found that Gatwa had drunk his milk, while Gahutu had fallen asleep and knocked over his pot. Gatutsi, however, had watched over his pot the whole night. For Gihanga this means that Gatutsi was the most responsible and thus was meant to succeed Gihanga, As a result, Gahutu was ordered to serve Gatutsi.

THE TUTSI DOMINANCE:
Although the Tutsi were greatly out numbered by the Hutus, they used their physical strength and mobility to gain control of what would become Rwanda without much fighting. The beginning of the Tutsi dominance started with a single Tutsi clan, the Nyiginya which owned a large number of cattle and wanted to expand the cattle-grazing territory. This clan also achieved political dominance in Central Rwanda and overtime expanded by incorporating other clans and taking land from the Hutus. By 1500s’, the Nyiginya had established a small monarchy- the kingdom of Rwanda, based on a small area of modern day Rwanda, under their king called the “ Mwami”. The first king of the centralized monarchy was Mwami Mibambwe 1 Mutabazi. He was considered a divine being, owned all the land within the kingdom and was in charge land distribution.

Typically he awarded land to members of his Nyiginya lineage and to the more powerful Tutsi elite. In this centralized monarchy, most Tutsi were cattle herders, soldiers and administrators, whereas most Hutus were farmers. The Tutsi elite upper class enjoyed many privileges, and created a number of myths and legends to pacify the king’s status and Tutsi’s superiority. The foundation of this monarchy was a feudal system called Ubuhake in the Southern and central regions of the kingdom and Ubukonde in the North- that offered incentives to both to the Hutus farmers and landholdings the Tutsis. The Ubuhake was an oral agreement between a client (peasant) and a patron (lord) through which the client provided crops and provided services for the lord. In return, the lord gave the client cattle, offered protection from the threatening force, and allowed the client to use his land. Most of the lords were Tutsi, and most of the clients were Hutus. A person of lower status (usually a Hutu) worked for a higher status (usually a Tutsi) in return of protection and some rewards, including cattle. The two major key roles in the Rwandan feudal system were Shebuja (lord) and Garagu (Servant) or vassal. In genera, to be a rich lord meant that one was a Tutsi, and being poor meant being a Hutu. This feudal structure gave military power and land to the Tutsi and to the very few Hutu who managed to acquire wealth and cattle. A few became Tutsi. This process of becoming a Tutsi was called Guhutura, meaning to shed Hutu status. Likewise, a Tutsi who lost land and cattle lost his rank and became a Hutu. Status in the kingdom of Rwanda was fluid and flexible. A person who was born Hutu could work to become a Tutsi. A Twa, however, remained a marginal group who were largely ignored by others. Under colonial rule the class differences between the Tutsi and Hutu came to be viewed more and more as ethnic differences. Where a person’s status had once been flexible, it was now seen as fixed at birth by the person’s ethnic background. Later, ethnic differences led to terrible violence between the two groups in Rwanda, Burundi and the neighboring countries.

Status in the kingdom of Rwanda was based on the ownership of cattle. In order of a Hutu to acquire cattle, it was necessary for him to work for a Tutsi family for several years. At the same time, the Tutsi required the Hutu to provide products. These factors placed the majority ethnic group of the Hutu in Rwanda at a great economical disadvantage and pushed them into a lower class of society.

RACIAL STERIOTYPES:
The Europeans formed a stereotype or simplified mental pictures about the Hutu and Tutsi people. According to their description, the Tutsi were elite, tall, thin light skinned well educated rulers and were said to be quit, reserved and relaxed. Yet some Europeans described the same qualities negatively saying that the Tutsi were secretive, arrogant, and lazy, also sometimes interpreted as wealth and power, as a result of shrewd opportunistic, unscrupulous behavior in their part.

Some Europeans even suggesting that the Tutsi, rarely speak their minds and so offer lies especially when dealing with a stranger.
Nevertheless, during the early colonial period, most Europeans believed that the Tutsi were natural born leaders. They saw the Tutsi as superior to the Hutu (majority) in all aspects and believed that the Tutsi were therefore, destined to rule the Hutu. Because the Tutsi were taller and more advanced than the Hutu, the Europeans believed that the Tutsi were descended from Ham, a person mentioned in the Bible and called them Hamites.
In contrast, the Europeans described the Hutu as short, stocky, uneducated peasants who comprised the general population and darker than the Tutsi. According to the Europeans the Hutu were servile, rowdy, gluttonous and undignified.

ETHNIX STRIFE: Ethnic conflicts can be caused by one issue or by a combination of factors. For instance, different religious, social, or political beliefs can divide people. Discrimination against people based on their ethnic identity, social status, ancestry, wealth, education level, or the language they speak can also lead to conflict. In Rwanda the Hutus and the Tutsis share a common language and a set of social values and have the same religious beliefs. The clash between the two groups has resulted from social and political power struggles. The Hutus and the Tutsis have a complex history. By early 1800s’, the Tutsis were politically powerful and held much of the best land in Rwanda. Meanwhile, the Hutus were mainly peasants, farmers, and unskilled labourers who had little political and social power. As a result, the Hutus and Tutsis were divided along class lines. However, the political system was complex, and some Hutus held positions of power. In addition, intermarriage between the Hutus and the Tutsis was common, and identities were common. Hutu families that acquired wealth would come to be regarded as Tutsi. Conflicts, when they occurred, cut across ethnic lines, uniting one faction of Tutsis and Hutus against another. During the colonial government rule during the Germany and s, they favoured the Tutsi and exaggerated the existing class differences. The favouristm allowed the Tutsis to gain greater control over the Rwandan society. Tutsis acquired land and received positions and business in the colonial governments by then. With the help of the colonial powers, the Tutsis were to crash any Hutu resistance to Tutsi dominance. During that time, the Hutus became the second-class citizen with little access to education and few means of improving their lives.
A change in attitude by the Belgian colonial authorities enabled many Hutus to gain access to education in the 1050s. This change not only allowed the Hutus to move upwards in social class but also gave them an increased awareness of their human rights as Rwandan citizens. From then on, fuel for the Huts-Tutsi conflict came partly from the discrimination many Hutus felt they had suffered under centuries of Tutsi rule and European colonization.

An outgrowth of these feelings was the 1959 revolution, which led to social and political advancement for the Hutus. After 1959 ethnic discrimination was reversed and turned against the Tutsis. Hutu leaders insisted that, as the majority, the Hutu people should rule the country. Hutus came to dominate economic and political life- a situation that remained in place until the recent conflict of 1994 which was speared by the Tutsi who were in exile in Uganda from 1959 under the umbrella of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), a political and military organization created and organized by Tutsi exiles in Uganda. Fred Rwigyema and Paul Kagame , two Tutsi officers in the Uganda’s national resistance Army established the RPF in the late 1080s’. For your information, Paul Kagame now the President of Rwanda came to Uganda in 1959 when he was two (2) years old, until in 1994 after they invaded Rwanda and were able to return as refugees.

N.B This is part one of the entire story. More will follow in part 11.
After reading the introductory historical phase, what do you learn from it?

The Tutsi who now have become a major problem in the Greater lakes region of Africa, are trying to expand their empire to cover the East and Central African region.
Secondly, all what is happening in Uganda like the land grabbing, making the natives poorer is a master plan for them as they did and succeeded against the majority Hutus in Rwanda and Burundi.

What should we do from the above? Let’s all put out fist together, to unite as patriotic Ugandans to prevent what happened to Rwanda to again occur in Uganda. Prevention is better than cure.

Wait for the next Phase. This information is researched from various sources of books namely:
NRM esize obukyayi eri Banayuganda olw’obusosoze obwenkukunala n’obukyayi nga esinzira ku mawanga, endowooza ze byobufuzi neddiini. Awamu ne mu mbeera yebyenfuuna. Ebyo singa tebilabukilirwa mangu byandiletaawo akabasa mu maaso naddala ebigenda mu maaso mu Buganda, ne ku Baganda kati abalinyililiddwa eddembe lyabwe elyobwebange.
Singa ekyo tekilabukilirwa mangu, abantu bandyekyawa anti bwonyigirizza ennyo ennyindo, ogizaazza emize. Banayuganda bandyegatta nebatandiika okwelwanako okulwanyisa abantu abatono abalabika nga babatudde ku nfete. Ate banayugnanda abasing bakyalemeddwa okuyiga ebyafaayo bya Uganda naddala nga zi Gavumenti zikyusiddwa kukifuba, biki ebiba biddilira.
REFERENCES BOOKS:
1 The Heritage of African Peoples- Hutu & Tutsi. Authored by Dr. Amiable Twagilimana. ISBN #0-8239-1999-4 Copyright 1998.
2 World in Conflict- Rwanda Country torn Apart. Authored by Kari Bodnarchuk. ISBN# 0-8225-3557-2
Copyright 2000.
3 Genocide in Modern Times- Genocide in Rwanda. Authored by Frank Spalding. ISBN # 978-1-4042-1823-9 Copyright 2009.
N.B THE NEXT ARTICLE WILL BE WHO WAS FIGHTING WHO, THE ROOT CAUSES OF THE RWANDA’S GENOCIDE AND IT’S CONSEQUENCIES:

Mayiga has done well as Buganda’s Premier!


BY W.B.KYIJOMANYI VIA UAH

Folks:

The rule of thumb is when you see individuals win some position attacked by extreme right and left wingers means the individual is actually performing great. Right or left winger only praise individuals who do nothing.

The fact that the current prime Minister Owek Peter Mayiga is being attacked by neo-conservatives and left wingers is an indication of the great things he has accomplished under his watch within the constraints of the circumstances. Owek Katikkiro Peter Mayiga is not deluded by some utopian thinking to sit around and wait for the ideal environment before he can do something for his subjects.

He took the bull by the horn and the results are there for all with the balance to see and appreciate.

The “Ettoffaali” has been great success. And so is the completion of “Masengere,” . BTW, those making most noise and dismissing his success are the “mukono gamu” who have not given even a penny. Go yes the cheap. Go figure.

Owek Katikiro was given lemons and he has made very good lemonade out of it. Now his critics keep on shifting gear mbu he should be given powers. Who should give him the powers? Funny those talking like that are died hard NRM.

Everything Owek Katikiro has done such as his successful ‘Ettoffaali ” is in line with Buganda ‘s values of “bulungi bwansi”. But ugandans prefer to praise bure types who are talking shops. Look at KCCA and collapsing bridges in the city. What has the city with more money done for the people of Kampala?

Owek Katikiro should continue making lemonade from the lemons he has been handed. And why should Owek be the one to fight for democracy in Uganda? What about the bumbling opposition? They are paid is it 30 million shillings a month to talk about democracy so what have they done?

Owek Kakitiro should now move on issues such as health and preach common sense to save lives. We keep saying the health care suffers from poor funding. Yes. But many of the diseases killing Ugandans call for common sense to prevent. Trouble is no one is talking about preventive measures. Take cholera. Why should people of all places Kampala city died from cholera?

politics is about compromise. In the USA with divided government, a president and congress from different parties must compromise to advance their programs. Sure no side gets everything, but if they compromise they get something done.

In my training the most important concept is the margin. We are trained to focus on marginal not total changes. So from my angle Owek Katikiro Mayiga has done very well. If you look at the changes at the margin, his achievements are huge.

Of course, I know his critics lacking appreciation of the value of the margin look at total changes. Wrong. I bet The Conservatives won the UK elections because they changed some people’s lives at the margin. It was those marginal changes-not total changes-that convinced them to vote for the incumbent PM. Likewise the position win if they reassure voters that their policies will impact their marginal lives.

Owek Katikiro Mayiga is a trained lawyer and is acting as a prudent man on behalf of his subjects. The key word here is prudent. Prudent actors do not sit there waiting for Godot. No. They weigh the impact of their choices or decisions on the margins. Of course not all people are happy but those who value the margin are happy. in Buganda the margin is expressed in the saying that take the little even as you keep arguing. Because of that insight Owek Katikiro has delivered through “Ettoffaali” where Ugandans from all walks have contributed what they can afford.

Well there is another insightful saying which goes that “kamu kamu gwe muganda/one by one makes a bundle. That is what his marginal approach to issues and problems has been able to do.

Now on land, I have concerns about the role of the Buganda Land Board in the destruction of Nabagereka Primary School Kisenyi. But other than, the Katikiro cannot tell his subjects what to do with their land. He may and should educate them about the value of land. For example that instead of selling they should lease.

I am a victim of the Land act. I have hundreds of acres of land through inheritance and I have the land title with me here but chunks of that land is settled on by bibanja holders and so called tenants many of whom cannot buy me out. I have offered them to buy me out in return for land title. They refused so no land title for them.The Land Act made the situation worse. Actually there are no winners except senior UPDF officers who are bale to evict tenants by force. I hope you are aware that most land grabbing and evictions in Buganda and Bunyoro are by serving senior UPDF officers. Remember on paper YKM says no landlord should evict sitting tenants. That only applies to civilians lacking NRM connections. The reality is that every day senior UPDF officers are evicting people and guess what, they are protected by police officers!.

The people who enacted the land act were stupid. Very stupid actually because they created the myth that you can have two or even three parties each claiming 100 percent ownership of the same land. You have a situation where land title holders claim 100% ownership of the land, the same land is claimed by bibanja holders and tenants each claiming to own 100%. That is why there are no winners but losers save for UPDF officers. Policies are supposed to improve not worsen the situation but the land act did just that> make the land regime in Uganda worse.

the land Act illustrates failure to appreciate the concept of the margin. Many bibanja holders and so called tenants wanted security of tenure. This could have been achieve through reforms targeting the margins. Yes it is possible to enact win-win laws. As of now the land Act ushered in chaos. As a result, the land Act especially in Buganda is responsible for food insecurity in the region. Why? Too much uncertainty.

I spend months crafting measures that could be considered to address and reverse the chaos. I sent them to the land Reform commission and received acknowledgment but so far no changes have been implemented.

Mayiga will be remembered for kissing M7’s ass!


Buganda Kingdom premier Charles Peter Mayiga during an Interview with Daily Monitor in Kampala in 2015

By Ssekajja via UAH forum

Folks,

Depending on the lenses, each of us employs, to critically look at Charles Peter Mayiga, the Katikiro of Buganda, most of us will come up with either, good, bad, and all the in between.

The only important and most indisputable fact of Mayiga’s tenure will be his capitulation to the bullying tactics of the dictatorship, leaving the people of Buganda and all Ugandans at the mercy of Museveni. He will be remember as “the Katikiro who rolled over” and also “the Etofaali Katikiro”.

The interest of Baganda, and Ugandans, today, is not the restoring the Kasubi Tombs, or the finishing of Masengere, but establishing viable political conditions, that will endure and move the country forward, away from bad and corrupt leaders.

It would not be unfair to suggest Katikiro Mayiga, too, has fallen foul of the anti-bad government challenging stance, the line he towed before becoming Katikiro. He is benefiting himself personally, by softening his hard-line approach against a regime that has been in power for 30 years. He seems to have welcomed a life of luxury, military escorts, and give-way front running light flashing, noise making, police filled vehicles.

The guy who “crossed Lwera”, is laying in a Museveni handmade hammock, snoozing and being sung lullabies. He is now sitting pretty, running and enlarging his business interests. He is not bothered anymore by the decadence caused by the central government, as long as all is well around him.

The “Ensonga Ssemasonga” (the most important issue of all issues) is the return of federal sovereignty to Buganda, and extending it that to all regions of the country. The language should therefore be “return power to the regions as enshrined in the 1962 constitution”.

The only great Katikiro of Buganda will be one who forces the hand of the dictator into a twist, not one who creates buildings. Buildings can be destroyed, good governance will endure for ever!!!

When the Kstikiro uses statements to the effect of – ‘politics should end at gates of Mengo’, one can only draw one conclusion, – he has buckled under the influence of Museveni. What happened to that staunch monarchist who always accused the central government of stabbing Buganda in the back.

Well, If we are to redeem Buganda, and Uganda at large, from the clutches of tyranny, politics should be a daily diet of Mengo’s menu.

Should MPs of a party hindering progress on federalism, be allowed at Mengo? The answer is a ‘NO’!!! The logic here is support for Museveni / NRM, is support against the interest of Buganda.
Mayiga can influence how the Baganda MPs behave in relation to issues that affect Buganda.

We,from Buganda, will have to be steady fast, willing to speak firmly, and need be confrontational, if we are to redeem our natural birth right – freedom.

HOW DR. SSEMOGERERE WAS FORCEFULLY EJECTED OUT OF ACTIVE POLITICS


PAUL KAWANGA SSEMOGERERE

By Hon BETTY Namboze.

In 1996, Dr.Kawanga Ssemogerere who was the First Deputy Prime Minister in Museveni’s Government pulled off a very smart move when he resigned and struck an alliance with Politicians who hail from Northern Uganda. They formed a Political vehicle IPFC that greatly unsettled the regime which henceto had enjoyed unchallenged power.

This move ushered in an astonishing sudden mental and emotional disturbance to the person of Museveni. This was the first adult suffrage election that Museveni ever faced while in Power. Indeed the voting was organised in makeshift shades with black polythene materials and it was greatly rigged through ballot stuffing.

1980 elections


Ugandans came to know about this ballot stuffing when it was made public after the bitter quarrel between Kafumbe Mukama and Francis Babu who had both vied for the Kampala Central Member of Parliament seat. Then one of them let the cat out of the bag and revealed that indeed ballot stuffing was the key business in the makeshift kaveera shade.

After the elections, Museveni was up in task to break the Ssemogerere-Cecilia Ogwal led political alliance. An agitation was instigated in the Northern Uganda to blame their Baganda allies for failure to vote for Ssemogerere 100 percent. In Buganda, another agitation was instigated to blame Ssemogerere for allying with the Obote who “killed Muteesa and that he wanted to come back and ban the Kabakaship”.

These agitations were made to kill the alliance that had joined the Northern part of Uganda and Baganda region.

The fact of the matter was that Cecilia Ogwal wasn’t working for the return of Obote because, from exile Obote had decreed that UPC shouldn’t participate in a Museveni organised election. Cecilia Ogwal and the Northern Uganda politicians had defied Obote. On the other hand, the Baganda especially the youth had voted for Ssemogerere because of their strong DP ties. Museveni under a strategists team that was reportedly led by Bidandi Ssali had rigged elections heavily in Buganda to fit into the narrative that Baganda couldn’t vote Ssemogerere who had allied with the Northerners because they hated them naturally.

Soon after the elections, another agitation cropped up in the now semj-structured opposition, the opposition and majorly the youth were “tired of Ssemogerere and they now wanted a more youthful leader and candidate”. The youth in the opposition declared a war of generations, the old men and women had to retire and give way to the youth. The focus shifted from fighting Museveni to fighting for supremacy in opposition.

In DP Bwengye led a rebellion and appointed his own NEC with the help of the DP secretary general Drametu who was deputised in that faction by Lulume Bayigga. It was around the same time that the Uganda Young Democrats who included Micheal Mabikke among others came up with a Super star and Popular Candidate in the names of Nasser Ssebaggala.

To be continued

Land grabbing in the north may be an experiment for elsewhere in Uganda


By Peter Simon via UAH forum
folks,

For so long we have allowed misplaced hatred to govern us resulting in discrimination, destruction of property and loss of life. While all these things were happening to some parts of the country, the rest were happy and celebrating.

Now time has come for every Ugandan especially all land owners to face the same fate; if it becomes law that government can take any land for “development projects” and pay later then all will cry, maybe that will mark the beginning of unity. It started from the north and northeast with IDPs but once the project is concluded there, there will be a shift elsewhere, there is no mistake about it. This is a social experiment taking place, there will be no turning back; it is just a matter of time.

All Ugandans should not look at this issue as Amuru land or whatever; it is an experiment bound to spread throughout. I like development and land is one of factors (inputs) considered in localization of industry; any investor must factor the cost of one of the inputs (land) without which it will give false reports of profits/success. Let the investors or government negotiate with the land owners, agree on the compensation and pay for the land or give shares to the land owners, then proceed with the project.

Also, as Ugandans we should evaluate the success of investors where they already operate, how have such investments impacted the communities around where they operate. For instance, Ugandans should tour Busoga region to see for themselves how Madhavi Sugar Factory has improved the lives of people there so that we can expect some positive change for our people in Acholiland or any other place where such projects might be taken.

It doesn’t make sense to say it will improve the lives of Acholi people if same projects have not improved the lives of the people where they already operate. What will bring the difference?

How MUK can protect its students from Insecurity in Kampala!


BY W.B.KYIJOMANYI VIA UAH FORUM

Please take the ideas to the university administration and guild. They can at least do something on campus which is a city of its own. Improve lighting, install emergency phone numbers in bright-yellow -colour, sensitize university students about their locations, ensure the emergency phones work by simply puling the button and university and Wandegeya police would know the exact location. First year students should be given proposer orientation that all that glitters in the city is not necessarily good. Especially first year students coming to Kampala for the first time and get caught up in the excitement.

Also urge the university to have safe travel services made of a female and make student with walk talkies and the capacity to alert police in Wandegeya directly. . The university could buy carts for such safe services for students walking within 2 kilometers of campus. For example, students from the library could be escorted to Wandegeya, halls of residence and some of the nearby hostels and even Mulago. That is what safety is about. And universities can and should take it seriously to minimize opportunities for criminal elements to exploit.

Challenge the guild to do something practical beyond mere protests. Such service could be available from 7 pm to 12 pm or when the main library closes. The university should vet and then hire 20 students, 10 female , 10 male. Any student with a criminal record is not eligible for safe travel services, which would be paid duty. Pick up locations could be main hall, halls of residences, library even the main gate. Then students can feel secure.

Kampala could become the kidnap capital of Africa!


Folks:

Mr. Onyango-Obbo said something very interesting in his column , which the IGP should think about. That many of the kidnappings in Uganda especially around Kampala may have been carried out by rival state security agencies to discredit and undermine general Kale Kayihura’s leadership, an old boy of St Leo Kyegobe for his O’levels before joining SMACK. That is certainly credible. There are rogue elements within the multitude of security agencies created by YKM. Factor in the rivalry and Ugandans could be in for real trouble. as Mr Onango-Obbo opined with great trepidation, if the situation is not reversed Kampala could become the kidnap capital of Africa!. Very scary.

Bottom line: the IGP may plead with Ugandans for help but he must be on guard for similar rogue state agents. He may be lucky in that General Tumwine seems to be pre occupied with his Nommo gallery wars than upstaging him. if the blue eyed boys could dare undermine General KK, they certainly can do even more to discredit IGP Okoth Ochola.

While still at it, what is the state of lighting on Kampala streets for example? If there is proper lighting Ugandans should be able to move freely all night from the city centre to Wandegeya and Makerere. So what is the state of lighting on Bombo Rd between city centre and wandegeya? Wandegeya and Makerere Main gate etc.? What is the state of lighting om Makerere campus itself?

Proper lighting would certainly improve security and minimize opportunities for criminal elements to pounce.

Ditto between Wandegeya-Mulago-Kamwokya. With proper lighting why can’t Ugandans walk freely and safely to and from any time?

Also how many emergency phones connected to police have ben installed on university campuses and een identified streets and in working condition all the time. How many are there in Makerere? Do university students know they exist and their locations? One would have assumed the university mapped potential security risks due to perhaps bad lighting, location etc. and installed emergency phones painted in Yellow-sorry that is the colour here.

Furthermore what has the police, politicians , administrators parents, LC, FM radio stations done to sensitize Ugandans about their safety? How many programs on the numerous FM stations talk about safety on a regular basis? But I bet you many have programs preparing Ugandans for ‘feasting and being feasted on”.

How many Ugandans who are eager for free things-yes cheap-continue to get in cars or boda bodas with strangers? What is being done to warn Ugandans to forego such ‘free’ rides for the sake of their safety?

How about schools? Cellphones are the norm even in Uganda. Have schools asked parents to submit the names of individuals who are authorized to pick their children from school including their home numbers? It may still be the case that anyone can show up at any school and say I am here to pick so and so and off they go. Why is that still allowed when kidnappings and sacrifices of children is rampant?

Folks, blame the former IGP if you will but surely he can’t take responsibility for such stupidity in Uganda. A country of , well [fill in].

It goes without saying that safety begins with individuals. But if some Ugandans continue to trust strangers to enter their cars, board their boda boda and even their homes, there is nothing the police can do. As the saying goes “mujinga anawumia (sp). And many Ugandans fit that description at least when it comes to personal safety. Dumb as hell.

WBK

The IGP should consider these suggestions to fight crime in Uganda!


BY W.B.KYIJOMANYO VIA UAH FORUM

The IGP must show leadership and not play to the media. Some of the suggestions the IGP and his team should consider include the following:

1) If there is no police database yet for all criminal offenders-rapists and anyone convicted of a gun related crime-the IGP should act with speed and set up one to include all their details from finger prints , photos , locations etc.

2) All convicted rapists and anyone convicted of a gun related crime or robbery with violence MUST be required to report to the nearest police station if they change location. For example, if they move from Kireka to Mutundwe, they must report to the nearest police station in Mutundwe. The police must then notify residents without releasing the individuals name that a convicted rapist or hard core criminals now lives within their vicinity. That warning is to alert residents as the police and LC since YKM destroyed chiefs must then keep an eye on the criminals. Whenever and wherever they move to, the convicted criminals in the categories mention MUST report to the nearest police station. If they live normal lives without reoffending fine. However, should they be caught reoffending after doing their time, they should be designated serial offenders in the national criminal database.

3). All boda boda drivers must be vetted afresh, their finger prints taken and entered in a national database. I suppose boda boda are licenced. So before they get those licensing, there should be a 3 day waiting period for police and other licensing agencies to verify. To eliminate bribery to get away with crimes, the locations where boda boda report for finger printing should not be the place where the final decision is mad. They can return to the initial point for results but the final decision is made elsewhere by a multi task team of police/URA/national ID authority or whoever issues IDs/ Licensing authority etc. Members of the multi task agencies must have access to the finger print results simultaneously. Before prospective boda boda drivers are cleared, all such officers must approve and sign . Any prospective driver with a criminal record of ANY sort must be barred from boda boda activities. Same procedure should apply to taxi drivers and conductors.

Actually not just boda boda but those with criminal records must be barred from working with children, the elderly and other vulnerable populations. This means that all nursery school teachers and even lower primary school teachers must produce a police report. Failure to do so they are disqualified from such activities. To go further even domestic helpers should be required to produce those report reports generated from the said database. Why? Crime happens because of opportunity. These measures are intended to minimize such opportunities.

If I may ask,are boda boda bikes licensed? Do they have number plates etc.? If not they should. Do some boda boda drivers hire out their bikes? Drivers who are vetted, licensed and hire out their boda boda bikes to unlicensed and unvetted boda boda drivers should forfeit their licenses . However they are free to hire out their bikes to licensed and vetted boda boda drivers. Are boda boda drivers licensed to ply particular roads or they are free to go anywhere? that ought to change. Boda boda drivers should be licensed to drive in specific zones, for example Kampala North aka Kawempe division, South Division, East Division, Central division etc. Of course police should be flexible in case a boda boda picks up a students from Makerere who wants to go to Kyambogo and vice versa.

4). The police should investigate through and not rush to take suspects to Court aka Kenya style where they arrest and then investigate. That is why all high profile corruption cases in Kenya have failed. Why? Police play to the media , rush to arrest suspects and then investigate . IGP Ochola should be wary of press conferences or even acting on pressure from media and the public. Let the police take time to investigate cases and only when ready go to court. Obviously the situation in Uganda is tricky, the police and DPP need to be on the same page.

If I may ask again,does the IGP or the police in Uganda know where convicted hard core criminals who were released from prison are/ How many are still in Kampala? How many moved to Kampala from upcountry etc. If they have no clue how do they hope to fight crimes? Folks, studies show that younger offenders in particular are very likely to reoffend within less than one year.

The IGP and Ugandans must realize that police is a necessary evil.

Not everybody in Uganda Police is Bad!


By Peter Simon in Canada

Most of our police men and women are actually good and descent people, only a few criminals have spoiled the police institution. I have good friends, relatives and other people I came to know through my other engagements who are so professionals but when you give thugs police uniforms and guns or you rapidly promote juniors to high ranks without attaining right experience and training for the position, then disaster befalls the institution and the nation but that doesn’t mean that all are bad.

What we need is to reorganize the force, carry out head count and let individuals identify where they trained, who were their squad mates, where did they study and when did their complete their programs etc, which can be verified in many ways and that would help weed out thugs posing as policemen and women police.

I think I have narrated here how those police you abuse made a stellar recovery of my bag containing very sensitive materials in Kampala; I was shocked to see policemen coming to look for a gentleman who had reported theft of his bag, when I reached the station, indeed it was my back, yes they did it so it is wrong to blame the entire force. And not long ago, I visited Uganda and some conman sweet talked me into surrendering Sh.300, 000 and disappeared; I reported the matter to police and after describing the conman’s appearance, the police went into work and I went my way but 3 days later when I returned home, they informed me that they had arrested the guys and true to their word, the conman and his mastermind were behind bars, they apologized but I told them that all I wanted was my money which they paid and I left them with the police.

Yes, some members in police uniforms are unprofessional but it is hard to know whether they are the Uganda Police Force UPF) or Kale Kayihura Police Force (KKPF) personnel because Kale Kayihura could pick thugs and promote them to any rank as he liked ( eg Abudalla Kitatta, Dixon etc.)

Southern Sudan and Somalia wars are like a business to Museveni and his family!


By Annet Kobusingye via UAH forum

Sudan is like M7 second home. He creates wars and sponsors them in order to remain big. This is how he benefits from.somemof the wars:

1.His family members are exporting food. Many business men were hoodwinked to supply food to similar place like the first family when they took food to Sudan but their trailers,cars and food packages were confiscated and drivers arrested. Their money wasted and these business men in kla today they are crying over their money that was never paid. That is how he weakened some rich men in Uganda.

2. Some Ugandan business peopple were robbed or killed in Suddan as they attempted to follow their goods in hope they would recover their vehicles.

3. Keep northern region distabilised with guns in circulation.Many refugees entered northern region with them. It’s has been difficult to separate a refugee from a rebel. The local in another region fear refugees more than anything because they are armed. Who is allowing them to enter with guns? the M7 regime. Whom do the refugees salute? Museveni.

4. In times of elections,so many refugees enter through this route of Sudan,they register and vote. No body should deceive you that they don’t vote. They do vote for M7. If you don’t believe my story go to isingiro quotelybd ask the local in Isingiro mbarara District,where so many refugees havebeen captured and you be shocked with details you will find.

5. Makes money from inflated numbers of refugees in the country and gets more donor funding which he channels into his private businesses.

From such deals he cannot allow a war to come to an end.

Now on realising that people have discovered his game, he is so quick to arrange a peace talk deal Sudan.

Another example was Somalia. He has been putting it that the war in Somalia is so bad and the donors pumped lots of money for him.

He once surprised the Anite world when he returned empty COFFINS at Entebbe international and presented them to cameras.Up to now no body has ever been hurried nor printed in news papers to have died or families to have have r received their dead ones…..

National parks have been turned into bidding sports for the regime. Lions have been poisoned and unknown people placed in those national parks.Nobody knows where these people come from nor their motives.The tourism indutry is headed by an NRM man who has no backbone to ask what has happened to our lions.The entire national parks is covered with long horned cows now day.

Kyanjo wasn’t poisoned by ‘Kayibanda’!


By George Okello in London

Mr Hussein Kyanjo is said to have suffered from DYSTONIA.London University College Hospital(UCL) diagnosed and treated Mr Kyanzo for many years.UCL is one of the top 5 hospitals in the world, and so if it diagnosed Mr Kyanjo as suffering from Dystonia and treated him for it for many years, then I can’t see how the alternative diagnosis of “poisoning” comes into the picture. UCL treats a number of conditions for which currently there is is no cure. I am myself a patient, having been diagnosed with SARCOIDIOSIS, another incurable disease, since 2009, and have been on steroid treatment ever since, which only controls and stops my body immune system from launching parasitic attacks on itself, but does not cure the illness itself.. If I die now, it may be convenient to accuse Kayibanda of poisoning me, but in reality it is SARCOIDIOSIS that would have done me in and beaten Kayibanda Museveni to it.

However pleased he will be with the outcome, Kayibanda will never claim any credit for my death. I mention this point because I want Ugandans to face the reality of their medical conditions and to refrain from the habit of finding convenient alibis for inconvenient conditions. 95% of Ugandans who die of HIV/AIDS for eg never admit it, and will claim other causes of death- usually Heart Attack. This habit must stop. If I die of Sarcoid- I want Ugandans to know it is sacoirdoisis that has killed me, and not poison from kayibanda.

Secondly,the announcement of Abbey Semuwemba’s death was a little bit premature. Apparently it is a wish list by some individuals annoyed with Senuwemba’s constant attacks and criticism of Mr Bob Wine. It attracted debate on his Facebook forum, Senuwemba himself refused to deny or confirm his unfortunate demise, so we assume he is still living, rather than resting in peace!

HUSSEIN KYANJO: A POLITICAL TRAILBLAZER ”POISONED” BUT NOT KILLED!


Hussein Kyanjo eyaliko MP wa Makindye West


By Muzinyabigere Huza via UAH Facebook group

I take time off from Museveni’s lies to business people in the Kampala commercial district to look at a man who created this struggle. Many young activists and opposition players think the world began a fortnight ago but we have real Generals of the Struggle who deserve respect to the meaning of the term.

Uganda first experienced Hussein Siliman Zirabamuzaale Jakan Kyanjo in the late 80s and early 90s at Nakasero Tabligh mosque. He was actually delegated by the then Amiru Dawra Shk. Kamoga as the news anchor for Muslims. His role was to seek for vital news around town and actually inside Islam in Uganda and around the world and give it to the Muslims at his prayer mosque. His day was Monday. Muslims could travel all around Kampala to listen to this talented young boy of eloquence. Everyone was so surprised of how he could collect such vital information just in a week. He was the only boy then in the city who talked boldly against Museveni’s mistakes. Remember by this time, Museveni was Uganda’s sweetheart. But while Ugandans were still celebrating Museveni and the liberators, and while they were still lamenting and cursing the past regimes especially Obote and Amin Kyanjo was already on the podium warning them against this regime. Only for Ugandans to witness after over 20 years that Hussein Kyanjo was worthy their attention.

Eloquent, bold, clever, small size and resilient had opened up a Private design and Printing Company which he named Siphon Arts Ltd in kampala and the best at the time after his graduation at Makerere in 1986. He was the only graduate in his year who never sought employment giving him both freedom of thought and association. I don’t know why these boys who grew up in those big Islamic families are so aggressive! Kyanjo was already married in two years after his graduation, bought a private car, built a home and performed Hijja in Makkah and Madina. He was a lucky hustler since teenage.

My favorite politician caressed the ears of Ugandans after the introduction of political shows on Ugandan private radios ( Ebimeeza). I remember the most popular was that of CBS which my late mother never missed. Everyone could talk but Kyanjo could talk! Everyone was surprised how this boy survived Museveni’s prisons. Here is the reason: He never talked about anything until he had proof that it was perfectly right. He joined public politics in 1996 after they had registered a party with the likes of Muhammad Kibirige Mayanja, Imaam Kasozi, Omar Kalinge-Nnyago and others. The party name was Justice Forum commonly known as #Jeema a short form for Justice,Education,Economic Revitalisation,Morality and Africa Unity. The name Jeema stands for the party well thought of manifesto. He was the chairman of Kibirige Mayanja’s presidential campaign of 1996 which position he held best as compared to all taskforce chairpersons. His role was too perfect that he was identified by the American election observers as the best and consequently he was invited by the American Council of Young Political Leaders(ACYPL) to participate in the electoral observation that saw Bill Clinton return to office for his second and final term in 1998. While there, he underwent special practical tutorials for leadership but most especially self administration. No wonder he is one of the most humble but resilient legislators Uganda has gotten. Most of you began following him in 2001 when he contested with the Late Hon. Yusuf Nsambu for Makindye parliamentary Seat. He lost. He was so respectful that he has no record whether during campaigns or after his loss of attacking his opponent as we witness today’s madness. I remember his loss hurt many people even those outside his party. Ssemujju Nganda who was by then not in politics but writing at Daily Monitor says: “I hurt on the news of Kyanjo’s loss to the extent that I broke to tears. It hurt me more than I’d hurt me to lose my own contest…”! That’s the position of Kyanjo in the hearts of Ugandans. He still participated in all events of the struggle and his voice weighed more than a truck full of sand.

No one knows who taught and how Hussein learned this eloquence. The way he selects his words, his calmness and poise won the hearts of many and made him earn the respect of even those in the government he was fighting except two as we shall unmask them later. Maybe he got this wisdom from Ntuuma Primary school a school on his birth village Ntuuma in Bukomansimbi where he was born on Sunday 20th November 1960 to Hajj Siliman Zirabamuzaale Jakana and Hajjat Nabuuma Mariam? Who between the two parents was this clever!? Omusajja mugezi! Or did he get the wisdom from Bwaise Islamic primary school, Mbuulire P/S or Kako P/S where he sat for his PLE in 1975? I’m soon investigating this Masaka S.S where he went for secondary in 1976 because every old Student of theirs I have met is an outstanding personality!

So our man of the day stood again in 2006 and won the mp seat which he served for two terms. He’s a federalist in great love with his Kabaka. He is the vice chairman deputising Mp Bakireke Nambooze on kabaka’s Buganda Civic Committee that was instated by the King himself in 2007 when Museveni moved to enact laws meant to grab land from Ugandans through law. This one is not the first attempt. Museveni put a team headed by one of his cheap ministers Kinobe to move allover Uganda sensitising Ugandans on the need for the government to be the sole owner of land in Uganda, the Kabaka instated his team too and the Kabaka won this war. The front Generals were Hussein Kyanjo and Nambooze. After that war, in 2008 Museveni moved to give away our Mabira Forest to the Indian investor Mehta to use the land for cane growing. It was Kyanjo and the Kitgum District woman Mp when she was still Pro-People Beatrice Anywar who moved to save the forest. With the support of the people and Buganda kingdom, they organised the first of its kind People’s Demonstration against Mabira give away. Thousands thronged the streets in their support, people were injured and some died due to police’s naughty behaviour. Both of them were arrested. Kyanjo was bailed out by his wife and son. After the awakening of Ugandans, and after the whole country said no, Museveni gave up his plans as then. But later, go tour Mabira!
Kyanjo had become a factor in Uganda and most worryingly in the hearts of Ugandans. In 2010, he had been elected in his party as the party’s presidential flag bearer but rallied behind the opposition gladiator Col. Kizza-Besigye Wrn in the then loose Inter Party Coalition (IPC) which was not only fought by the Despot but also fellow opposition personalities like Abed Bwanika and Norbert Mao. In Parliament he influenced many people from the speaker to the guards. His debates are the most memorable on the Hansard.

An articulate lawmaker, a rabble-rouser, a sobre leader, a Buganda kingdom enthusiast and staunch Muslim and a sheikh.Rummaging through the records of Parliament, Kyanjo’s name appears prominently in The Hansard. And he was not only exemplary in debate but conduct too. Kyanjo was so disciplined and committed to whatever he does that he keeps time and rarely missed the plenary and parliamentary committee debates where his contribution was well documented.

It was, therefore, not surprising when the African Leadership Institute (AFLI) scorecard placed him amongst the top ten best performing lawmakers. Although on opposition, Kyanjo was the most respected MP during his tenure.

Once in a while he got agitated and unleashed his acerbic tongue. For instance, at the peak of the central government and Buganda attrition in September 2009, after violence erupted in Buganda following the government refusal of the Kabaka to tour Kayunga district, Kyanjo boldly suggested that Mengo, the seat of the kingdom, should secede from Uganda which I supported to date.

Yet Kyanjo is one man who is always ready and willing to reach out across the political aisle and make political compromises. Even after a heated debate, Kyanjo could be seen chatting up a minister, trying to put his point across and mend fences. After Dr Kizza Besigye, the FDC leader, was incessantly sprayed with pepper as security officers brutally arrested him in 2011, emotions ran high in the House. Daudi Migereko, the then government Chief Whip, revealed that he sought Kyanjo’s counsel as to how to handle the highly emotional debate.

“We had spent a lot of time bickering over the video and he advised the House on how to move,” said Migereko.

The Kigulu South MP, Milton Muwuma, who chaired the Internal Affairs and Defence committee, observed that Kyanjo’s sobre views often came in handy to give the committee direction.

“The committee had always been persuaded to follow his objective views despite being an opposition member,” Muwuma said. In cases of a sharp disagreement, Kyanjo’s pacifist nature is often called upon to suggest a way forward.

“He advised and guided the committee,” Muwuma told The Observer in 2012.

The Bukooli Island MP, Peter Okeyoh, another colleague on the committee, agreed with Muwuma, adding that Kyanjo is reliable and thorough.
“He is someone who brings every detail to the attention of the committee,” he said. This kind of influence didn’t go down well for Kyanjo, he was a threat to the junta and their communist plans. He was seen as a person who’d slowly change the house’s opinion at the expense of the despost. The plan against him was hatched:

In October 2011, while investigating the [oil] bribery allegations something bad happened to his life. He was the chairman of the investigations team that was pressing who pulled what from the Oil deal. The scheme was so deadly that his friends and colleagues began warning him of the thought danger to his life.
Kyanjo, says he had travelled to Johannesburg South Africa for Parliament business in early 2011 when two days into the trip, he woke up to realise he was struggling to speak.

“I started feeling something in my tongue and I was failing in my speech. I thought it was something small. I had gone to South Africa with Patrick Amuriat Oboi now Party President for FDC who represented Kumi County in Parliament then. I couldn’t speak well and I thought it was something small that could be fixed easily by a doctor on return home.

I went to see the doctor but he could not identify what my problem was. I had some missing teeth and I thought it was one of the problems, but when I went for that (check), it was not part of the problem until I went to an Iranian-owned hospital in Dubai. There, they diagnosed me with a disease called Dystonia.

They said it was a rare stubborn disease; it resists drugs and is very disturbing to one who has it. They gave me some drugs which I started using but also referred me to a London hospital where they said it was going to be better for me.

So, when I returned, I went to the Speaker and explained to her my ordeal and she gave me a go ahead and Parliament sponsored me to go to the University Hospital of London where I was getting treatment for the last two and a half years.”

Kyanjo says he traveled to London every three months from 2012 to get two toxin injections on the lower part of his jaws to keep the muscles in shape.

Kyanjo says doctors told him his condition could have been caused by any of three factors, an inheritance of the disease, effects of a serious accident or poison.

“I checked and found I could not have inherited it because no one has suffered from such a disease in our family. It also cannot have been caused by an accident because I have never been involved in any. So, I was left with one possibility—poisoning.”
Kyanjo says during a typical attack, he keeps fighting not to swallow his tongue….
Swallow his tongue, I said; swallow his tongue! He was pressed with a battery inside his chest. That battery he charges with another that he fixes in a socket for him to talk every after three months!

So he was poisoned to kill his influence. He was poisoned because he insisted on righting the wrongs of his country. He was poisoned for fighting graft and corruption. He was poisoned for not accepting a position in the junta government after their many trials. He was poisoned because he was a diehard #Besigyevite. He was poisoned because Ugandans believed and trusted him. He was poisoned because he was intuitive. He was poisoned because he’s a federalist. He was poisoned because of you and me. Such are the people who owe us respect. They gave their lives for the struggle we are wasting. Even though he is under such conditions he has refused Museveni’s money. He still stands for what he stood for while still alive. He stands with Kizza-Besigye in all these. He stands for the struggle. He is one reason I can’t forgive the regime. However he says; “You should be happy and grateful to Allah because am not the same but am alive thats why you can reach me. My wife and Afande Kirumira who died a month ago can’t be consulted for any thing”.

Bobi Wine is like Ben Kiwanuka:From village boy to Prime Minister!


Benedicto Kiwanuka with his family

By G.H.K in Paris, France, via UAH forum

I’ve seen Mr Abbey Ssemuwemba’s points and the accompanying comments. And I’m grateful to all this effort!A previous posting cites names of those men who rose from nowhere to become leaders. I add on the name of the Great Benedicto Kiwanuka,orphaned at 11 her mother had no fair means to pay the school fees he needed to go to Namilyango College where he had been admitted after his junior secondary school studies at St Peter’s SSS Nsambya. He stayed for some years in his native village in Masaka doing ordinary farming until he was enrolled in the KAR to fight in World War II. After this he received a clerical job at the High Court in Kampala. He made some savings and got married. Then after he sponsored his way to Southern Africa in Lesotho (then known as Basutoland) where he enrolled at a newly opened university to do the intermediate ( equiv A-Levels). Had a lot of financial difficulties to complete the course! Fortunately his efforts were crowned with great success when he passed with flying colours and was admitted to do law at London University where he passeed with honours and was admitted to the bar. Subsequently on joining politics in Uganda he was elected to head the DP and he won the 1961 general elections and became Uganda’s first Prime Minister.

From village boy to Prime Minister! Now when people, in particular the numerically very important youth look at Bobi Wine they see in him what we’ve seen in these people who rose from quasi-ghettos to become leaders. And this is where Bobi Wine is drawing support not only in Uganda but also on the international scene. He has succeeded to rise to the highest and be a real threat to Museveni whom he has humiliated in many things including a debate at Makerere and the by-election wins where Museveni’s presence in campaigns was rather unnoticeable in the presence of very charismatic young politician who articulates issues correctly to the point of winning huge applauses from his numerous attendance! He’s a politician without a party! But he has proved that he can move forward thanks to his brilliant approach and contact with the many who matter in the country.Likewise he has succeeded to create a national global constituency already rooted in the philosophy of the deep-seated influence acquired through his musical tones that could draw masses to his audience. And the philosophy of his action lies here : the effort to rise from nowhere to somewhere, the effort to broaden an air of contact at national and international levels, and the effort to to invest all these experiences in his political action. This is where he has won international prestige and respect.

In this case he isn’t a loner but a mobilizer of a following. His motto : People Power : Our Power comes at a very ripe time when another celebrated motto, TOGIKWATAKO,launched by Norbert Mao and group, has already prepared good ground for his work! And everyone knows how the country will move and to which direction it will steer if Bobi Wine and others will be voted to lead Uganda. And their programme can be anticipated in advance from all aspects of the country’s national life. It’s clear the programme will have nothing to inspire from the failed NRM with Museveni at top for over 30 years! The youth as well as the abandoned and the marginalized will be the key beneficiaries.

It’s true Bobi Wine or any other leader who will come in after Museveni won’t need to follow anything to do with an ideology. Very true, it’s only the actions and the sense to rehabilitate the country and the yearn to push forward will be the creators of anything to do with ideology which in this sense will be the urge for positive action in every sector of the country’s national life!

Does Bobi Wine need to talk and negotiate with Museveni as some rumours have indicated? If anything, it’s Museveni who must and who has been advised to show humility and apologize to Bobi Wine! Bobi Wine, in my view, wouldn’t be expected to go and sit face to face with somebody who is quite oppressive to any opposing view. Let’s judge the situation as it is now. On the one hand we see a 74-year-old person, in pôwer for over 30 years, and now at the sunset of that power which is presently being cursed globally for the many mistakes done to the people including changing the constitution to continue clinging to power! And is surrounded by age-mates who only just listen to his views without formulating any argument on them! And on the other hand we can just see a very young brilliant up-to-the-minute statesman enjoying wide support in his country and abroad where he has been reckoned as
one of those who will contribute to the advent of a new spring in Uganda.He’s surrounded by very many serious actors coming from the nation’s much multifaceted global life.And he is a in himself a sort of a symbol standing for the ideas of the many who now see sense in his People Power motto. He’s a multifarious personality tending to gather all currents in one stream. He is in full contrast with the other old man who appears to stand for himself surrounded by a few with hardly any influence remaining on them!

So if dialogue or negotiation, all that will centre on what? Will it be a sort of seeing a Museveni trying to control Bobi Wine’s action with intent on silencing him? Will Bobi Wine accept to submit to Museveni’s harsh-handed paternalism that would in the long run oblige him to abandon what he has so painfully launched aided by opposition politicians and some NRM individuals? If he submits to Museveni’s hegemony how will he be seen abroad and in neighbouring countries where his action is widely and very wildly saluted? And how will he be considered in Africa where the oppressed are now looking to him and his group as a source of inspiration for the launch of the good new days on the entire continent? And his very dynamic and pragmatic action which is mobilizing masses all over the region, should it
be submitted to that NRM decadence which is now seeing a fall in standards on practically every note! There is no need for Bobi Wine to submit to Museveni! It’s Museveni and group who should by any ruse, if possible, try to find through Bobi Wine a safe landing!

Bobi Wine and group have all the cards in their hands! What the NRM regime is now resorting to through the use of force is a very stupid childish venture! Force won’t prevent change from landing in a country that has now won the very much needed sympathy of the entire world community! And world reaction now is in favour of bringing about the necessary change that will usher in improvement in the ordinary Ugandan’s daily lot!

SOPHISTRY AND THE TRAGEDY OF THE MWENDA-LIKE ‘INTELLECTUAL’


By Edward Ssekalo

Sophistry, as defined by the Google Dictionary, is “the use of clever but false arguments, especially with the intention of deceiving.” A person who reasons with clever but false arguments is called a sophist. If you were doing a test and were out of time, you could as well summarise the definition of sophist as Andrew Mwenda. Even if there are a few others like him scattered all over social media, Mwenda is the poster boy of the art of sophistry in Uganda at the moment.

I once admired Mwenda by the way. As a student I followed him with religious devotion, witnessing his transformation over the years from a young journo who moralised, to a more mature commentator who analysed and finally to a former journalist turned businessman that uses his platform(s) to demonise any person who dares to remind us that injustice is a thing to be frowned upon; something to be RESISTED. At other times (most times), his energies will be expended on anyone that presents as a substantial threat to Mr. Museveni’s blood-fuelled hold onto power. Once it was Kizza Besigye. Now it is Bobi Wine.

Yet, I am not here to discuss Mwenda. I will instead respond to some of the fallacious arguments in his “Between Museveni’s frying pan and Bobi Wine’s fire”. First though, I will get one thing out of the way: as expected Mwenda retrieves his anti-Opposition talking points early on, brandishing his much-loved ‘radical extremist’ label which is reserved for pro-change supporters as a tool to blackmail.

As a comms professional, I know the power in disarming the person you are challenging by assigning derogative tags. It is supposed to give you the early advantage. I, however, will embrace that label. If Mwenda believes that by me voicing my displeasure with the state and style of governance of my country I am a disgruntled, talentless, unemployable, radical extremist, I will wear that label he has assigned as a badge of honour.

SO, WHAT DOES BOBI WINE STAND FOR?

The flaws in Mwenda’s piece are first shown up where he argues that “Bobi Wine’s only qualification as an alternative to Museveni is that he is critical of the status quo.” That is a most absurd assumption, because there are hundreds of Museveni opponents on the political stage. Does Mwenda stop to think why some and not others get traction in their campaigns for change? For one that passes himself off as ‘intellectual’, Mwenda should do some thinking, and show evidence of it when he writes.

He continues that “Our ‘intellectuals’ don’t care what [Bobi] stands for, the values he represents, the policy alternatives he proposes, the leadership abilities he has exhibited, the alliances he is cultivating and the organizational ability he has demonstrated.”

If Mwenda isn’t exhibiting willful ignorance, then I would suggest he does a simple Google or Facebook search. It is laughable to impute that Bobi Wine has yet to demonstrate leadership abilities (a man that was so influential even Mwenda’s friend Kale Kayihura turned to him to engage ghetto youth- that was before Bobi was even MP). Mwenda then questions the alliances Bobi is cultivating (he obviously hasn’t heard that Bobi Wine has allied with three different political bases in the last one year and which bases emerged victorious in by-elections in Arua, Bugiri, Jinja and Rukungiri). And then the winner: he dares to question Bobi Wine’s organizational ability. Seriously? A man that swept a by-election competing against an FDC incumbent and a generously-funded NRM candidate in Kyadondo East? Do you start to see the definition of ‘sophist’ in these claims by Mwenda?

Nonetheless, let’s address the suggestion that it is not clear what Bobi Wine stands for. Long before he joined the political fray, Bobi Wine identified himself as one for freedom and justice (political, economic and social), and one whose desire is a Uganda that works for all. Here is one of his quotes from last year: “Our aspiration is to live in a country in which every Ugandan is equal, free and dignified. Where every life is valuable. Where no one is above the law. Where no one can kill a Ugandan and sleeps sound[ly] – knowing that they are protected by the state.”

Bobi Wine does not need a fancy 10-point program, framed, to make these points (besides, we know how well those who came with 10-point programs and blackboards have turned out 32 years later). The millions of Ugandans he inspires know it too. He doesn’t need to identify as Marxist or clothe himself in the elitist “liberal democrat” dress the Mwendas pretend to champion for us radical extremists to agree with him that we need change.

For crying out loud, when Salim Saleh joined Mr. Museveni in their Bush War I bet he couldn’t even spell the word ‘Marxist’, let alone explain the ideology. I would bet the likes of Elly Tumwine and Abdul Nadduli followed Museveni to the bush because they had had enough of the status quo, or, quite possibly, sensed an opportunity to enjoy a life of largesse if their gamble paid off.

If Mwenda were truly the impartial analyst he purports to be, he should at least acknowledge that Bobi Wine has shown an admirable ability to read the political mood and recognize that there is a growing shift from a belief in parties (at least for pro-change Ugandans) to a growing faith in non-partisan/cross-partisan initiatives. It was that vehicle that delivered Kyagulanyi the MP. A similar approach delivered Emmanuel Macron to the French presidency, just saying.

IT’S THE YEARNING FOR FREEDOM, STUPID!

So, like Saleh was in 1982, many 22-year-old Ugandan youth today relate with Bobi Wine’s struggle for their freedom if not to do anything else, at least to WhatsApp and share their nudes in peace, without the unnecessary impediment of OTT tax. That freedom has been taken away by a government that taxes them unjustly, and impoverishes them slowly but steadily by yanking out of their hands the power to make a living as ‘hustlers’ online, or as Mobile Money agents offline.

Mwenda, these Ugandans don’t need ideologies. They don’t need a mastery of macroeconomic policy. All they need is to hear words of inspiration and Bobi Wine provides those, like a good leader does, or should, and like your sugar daddy Museveni once did. If Bobi Wine needs top class economists to guide his policy, Uganda has enough of them, and at least he has shown that he is willing to seek and use expert opinion. That cannot be said of Museveni (anymore). The likes of Bobi Wine signify vanguards in Ugandans’ daily struggles for freedom and justice; social, economic or otherwise. It’s the freedom, stupid!

The one submission Mwenda made that I truly believed was honest (even if it reeked of ignorance) was the one that about Bobi Wine having to reward his supporters with jobs if he became president. If that is an idea coming from Mwenda, it shouldn’t be surprising at all. He has been around Museveni for quite a while now that the only standard he knows is the one Museveni has set, (which is also why it difficult for him to envision a Uganda where security agents don’t brutalise citizens).

But back to the point on jobs; as an analyst, the easiest way to attempt to predict what kind of president Bobi Wine would potentially be should have been for Mwenda to examine how Bobi Wine has run his constituency of Kyadondo East. But who needs the facts on the ground when there is an anti-Opposition demonisation template to feed ‘Bobi Wine’ or ‘Kizza Besigye’ into and hit the ‘Post’ button?

*The cry baby antics about being cyber-bullied were truly laughable though. If one calls you out for the intellectual fraud you are, don’t turn around and claim it is cyber-bullying. Or should we expect that you will advise your daddy to create a division of social media police to whip us (pun intended) into line?

Britain’s New African Empire


Britain’s New African Empire

by Mark Curtis

Companies listed on the London Stock Exchange control over $1trillion worth of Africa’s resources in just five commodities – oil, gold, diamonds, coal and platinum. My research for the NGO, War on Want, which has just been published, reveals that 101 companies, most of them British, control $305billion worth of platinum, $276billion worth of oil and $216billion worth of coal at current market prices. The ‘Scramble for Africa’ is proceeding apace, with the result that African governments have largely handed over their treasure.

Tanzania’s gold, Zambia’s copper, South Africa’s platinum and coal and Botswana’s diamonds are all dominated by London-listed companies. They have mines or mineral licences in 37 African countries and control vast swathes of Africa’s land: their concessions cover a staggering 1.03million square kilometres on the continent. This is over four times the size of the UK and nearly one-twentieth of sub-Saharan Africa’s total land area. China’s resources grabs have been widely vilified but the major foreign takeover of Africa’s natural riches springs from a lot closer to home.

Many African governments depend on mineral resources for revenues, yet the extent of foreign ownership means that most wealth is being extracted along with the minerals. In only a minority of mining operations do African governments have a shareholding? Company tax payments are minimal due to low tax rates while governments often provide companies with generous incentives such as corporation tax holidays.

Companies are also able to avoid paying taxes by their use of tax havens. Of the 101 London-listed companies, 25 are actually incorporated in tax havens, principally the British Virgin Islands. It is estimated that Africa loses around $35billion a year in illicit financial flows out of the continent and a further $46billion a year in multinational company profits taken from operations in Africa.

UK companies’ increasingly dominant role in Africa, which is akin to a new colonialism, is being facilitated by British governments, Conservative and Labour alike. Four policies stand out. First, Whitehall has long been a fierce advocate of liberalized trade and investment regimes in Africa that provide access to markets for foreign companies. It is largely opposed to African countries putting up regulatory or protectionist barriers to such investment, the sorts of policies where have often been used by successful developers in East Asia. Second, Britain has been a world leader in advocating low corporate taxes in Africa, including in the extractives sector.

Third, British policy has done nothing to challenge multinational companies using tax havens; indeed the global infrastructure of tax havens is largely a British creation. Fourth, British governments have constantly espoused only voluntary mechanisms for companies to monitor their human rights impacts; they are opposed to enhancing international legally binding mechanisms to curb abuses.

The result is that Africa, the world’s poorest continent, is being further impoverished. Recent research calculated, for the first time, all the financial inflows and outflows to and from sub-Saharan Africa to gauge whether Africa is being helped or exploited by the rest of the world. It found that $134billion flows into the continent each year, mainly in the form of loans, foreign investment and aid. However, $192billion is taken out, mainly in profits made by foreign companies and tax dodging. The result is that Africa suffers a net loss of $58billion a year. British mining companies and their government backers are contributing to this drainage of wealth.

We need to radically rethink the notion that Britain is helping Africa to develop. The UK’s large aid programme is, among other things, being used to promote African policies from which British corporations will further profit. British policy in Africa, and indeed that of African elites, needs to be challenged and substantially changed if we are serious about promoting long term economic development on the continent.

Mark Curtis

Mark Curtis is an author and consultant. He is a former Research Fellow at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) and has been an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Strathclyde and Visiting Research Fellow at the Institut Francais des Relations

WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED IN ARUA? MY STORY!



WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED IN ARUA? MY STORY!
(As narrated by Hon Kyagulanyi/Bobi Wine)

Fellow Ugandans, friends and well-wishers from around the world,

I am sorry, I have taken a bit long to write to you about the trials and tribulations, for which you all stood with me. It’s been tough days, as I recover from the physical and mental trauma I endured. I am overwhelmed by your support and words of encouragement. I cannot repay you in any other way, except sticking to those values which bind all of us together- justice, equality and human dignity.

I will be communicating more in the coming days and where possible send my appreciation to the different individuals and organizations. In this post however, I want to recount what exactly happened to me. I am very grateful to my wife Barbie, and my lawyers who narrated to the world these events, but I also wanted to tell this sad story PERSONALLY. I felt more compelled to speak out after reading the many posts written by President Museveni and other government officials about what happened.

I read the things they were saying while I was in detention, and found them absurd to say the least. I was shocked on how they tried to downplay the atrocities committed by security agencies on innocent citizens.
So let me set the record straight.

It was 13th August and it was the last day of campaigns in the Arua municipality by-election. As always we had a great campaign day. As I left the rally, I was convinced that our candidate Hon. Kassiano Wadri would win the election. So we moved from the rally at about 5:30pm and the people followed us, singing songs of freedom and chanting “People Power – Our Power.” Together with Hon. Kassiano and a few other leaders, we parted with the multitude, bade them farewell and went into Royal hotel where Hon. Wadri was staying.

We watched the 7:00pm news from the hotel lobby as we took tea and took stock of the day’s events. It was of course very exciting to watch that day’s news. The anchor said we were clearly ahead of the other candidates and the television relayed images of the massive rally and procession we had had on that day. Shortly after, I decided to move to Pacific hotel where I was staying so as to rest after the very busy day. It was at that point that I sat in my tundra vehicle, in the co-driver’s seat. The gentleman who was driving the tundra that day is one of our drivers (not Yasin). He moved out of the vehicle to call other team members who were supposed to drive with us. He took a bit long and I moved into my other vehicle (a land cruiser) which was right next to the tundra and whose driver was already seated on the driver’s seat. We immediately set off for Pacific hotel. I did not even see what happened after or how late Yasin ended up on my seat in the tundra. For clarity, he had been driving another vehicle that day.

I had started taking the stairs to my room when this driver came running to say that Yasin Kawuma had been shot. I could not believe it. I asked him where he was and he told me they were parked outside the hotel. We paced down and I saw with my own eyes, my friend and comrade Yasin, giving way as he bled profusely. I quickly asked a team member to take him to hospital and another to call the police. We had not stepped away from that place when angry looking SFC soldiers came, beating up everyone they could see.

As soon as they saw me, they charged saying “there he is” in Swahili. So many bullets were being fired and everyone scampered to safety. I also ran up into the hotel with a throng of people who had gathered around. Inside the hotel, I entered a random room and locked myself in. It is at that point that my media assistant shared with me Yasin’s picture which I tweeted because the world needed to know what was going on.

I could hear the people outside and in the hotel corridors crying for help. I could also hear the soldiers pulling these helpless people past the room in which I was, saying all sorts of profanities to them while beating them mercilessly.

I stayed in the room for a long time. At some point, I heard soldiers pull some woman out of her room and ask her which room Bobi Wine had entered. The woman wailed saying she didn’t know and what followed were terrible beatings. I could hear her cry and plead for help as she was being dragged down the stairs. Up to now, that is one experience that haunts me; that I could hear a woman cry for help, yet I was so vulnerable and helpless. I could not help her.

I stayed put for some hours, and I could hear the soldiers come every few minutes, bang some doors on my floor or other floors and go away. At different times I would sleep off, but was always rudely awakened by the banging of doors and the impatient boots that paced throughout the hotel for the whole night. In the wee hours of the morning, the soldiers started breaking doors of the different hotel rooms. With rage, they broke doors, and I knew they would soon come to my room. I therefore put my wallet and phone into my socks. I also had with me some money which I had earned from a previous music show. I also put it into the socks.

A few minutes later, a soldier hit my door with an iron bar and after two or three attempts the door fell in. We looked each other in the eye as he summoned his colleagues in Swahili. Another soldier pointed a pistol on my head and ordered me to kneel down. I put my hands up and just before my knees could reach the floor, the soldier who broke into the room used the same iron bar to hit me. He aimed it at my head and I put up my hand in defence so he hit my arm. The second blow came straight to my head on the side of my right eye. He hit me with this iron bar and I fell down. In no minute, all these guys were on me- each one looking for the best place to hurt. I can’t tell how many they were but they were quite a number.

They beat me, punched me, and kicked me with their boots. No part of my body was spared. They hit my eyes, mouth and nose. They hit my elbows and my knees. Those guys are heartless!

As they dragged me out of the room, they continued to hit me from all sides. After some time, I could almost no longer feel the pain. I could only hear what they were doing from a far. My cries and pleas went unheeded. The things they were speaking to me all this while, I cannot reproduce here. Up to now, I cannot understand how these soldiers who I probably had never met before in person could hate me so much.

They wrapped me in a thick piece of cloth and bundled me into a vehicle. Those guys did to me unspeakable things in that vehicle! They pulled my manhood and squeezed my testicles while punching me with objects I didn’t see. They pulled off my shoes and took my wallet, phone and the money I had. As soon as the shoes were off, they started hitting my ankles with pistol butts. I groaned in pain and they ordered me to stop making noise for them. They used something like pliers to pull my ears. Some guy unwrapped me and instead tied the thick cloth around my head. They forced my head below the car seat so as to stop me from shouting. Then they hit my back and continued to hit my genitals with objects. The marks on my back, ankles, elbows, legs and head are still visible. I continued to groan in pain and the last I heard was someone hit me at the back of the head with an object – I think a gun butt or something. That was the last time I knew what was going on.

By the time I became conscious again, I was somewhere in a small room with a small window. My legs were tied together with my hands with very tight cuffs. I was bleeding from the nose and ears. I was in great pain. My whole body was swollen. I was shaking uncontrollably.

Two soldiers came in. I can now recall that they were visibly pleased to see that I was still alive. They came close to me. One of them apologized in tears about what had happened. “Bobi, I am sorry but not all of us are like that. Some of us actually like you,” he said. He said that doctors were on their way to treat me. I stayed in the same position and after a few hours, about four soldiers came in and lifted me on a piece of cloth. One of them took a picture of me, (I hope to see that picture some day in my life). As we went out, I read “Arua airfield’ somewhere. I was taken into a waiting military helicopter and taken to a place which I later found out was Gulu 4th Division military barracks. It was at that facility that some military doctors came in and started giving me injections.

At that point I could not even complain as I was not yet fully alert. I was very dizzy and had not eaten or drank anything for many hours. My sight was very weak as well. I spent the night there. Late in the night, I was picked again from this detention facility. With my head covered with a dark cloth that felt like a t-shirt, I was taken to Gulu Police Station where I was forced to sign a written statement by an officer called Francis Olugo in the presence of some other officer who I later learnt is the CID head of Gulu. I can hardly recall what was contained in that statement! I was then returned to Gulu military barracks, put on a metallic bed and handcuffed on it. Very early morning, I was picked from this room and taken to another very secluded and dirty room where I was put on another bed, hand-cuffed again and injected with a drug that immediately sent me into a deep sleep.

The following day I can recall that at some point, Hon. Medard Ssegona and Hon. Asuman Basalirwa came to me. My efforts to rise and speak to them didn’t yield much. The moment they saw me, they could hardly hold tears. I have a faint recollection of what they told me, but their visit was very short.

I was later carried into a hall where I saw soldiers dressed smartly. I would lie if I said I fully appreciated what was going on at that point. I was later told that I was appearing before the General Court Martial!!!

After a short while, I was again carried into a military helicopter.

When it landed, I was put into a vehicle and driven to another place which I later found out was Makindye military barracks.

At Makindye, I was now fully alert and had a drink for the first time after two or three days. I saw doctors come in several times and they gave me all kinds of injections. At some point, I tried to object and these guys would hold my arms from behind and inject me anywhere. If I asked what drug it was, the guy would say something like, “This is diclofenac, can’t you see?” At some point, some guy came in and wanted to stitch my ear which had an open wound. I pleaded with him not to, and he relented. All the while I was spending the day and night with my hands and legs cuffed until a few days later. Thankfully although the scars are still visible, the wound on my ear healed.

It was after some time at Makindye that I was able to see my wife and my brother Eddy Yawe, who came in with some lawyers, some friends and dignitaries from the Uganda Human Rights Commission (UHRC). I will never forget the atmosphere in that room- people started crying upon setting eyes on me. At that point, I could not sit, walk or even stand by myself. I was still swollen and spoke with great difficulty due to chest pains. My teeth were shaking and the headache was unbearable. I am thankful that the UHRC made a report which I later read. At least it captured in part, the state in which they found me. As the government agency mandated to fight human rights violations, I am eagerly waiting to see what actions they will take to ensure that no Ugandan is taken through this ever again. Not even President Museveni. I cannot wish what happened to me upon anyone. Not even those soldiers who violated me as if they were beasts. I remember two other things about that visit. Despite the pain I had that day, I remember forcing a smile when they told me that I had been charged with unlawful possession of firearms.

I was told that three guns had been assembled and said to have been found in my room! I could not believe that the state would torture a Ugandan so bad and then frame him with possession of guns! I did not stop thinking about that for all the days I spent at Makindye. How ruthless, how callous, how inhumane could these guys be? It was also on that day that I was told about the alleged stoning of the President’s vehicle.

The other thing I remember is this- I asked my visitors if we had won the Arua election. They told me we had won with a big margin and I thanked God. That strengthened my spirit because I knew that the people were with us, even in the kind of sufferings and indignities we were being subjected to.

I was very sad as I am today, that they murdered my brother Yasin in cold blood and did not allow me to bury him. They told me about my other comrades who were also incarcerated and I kept praying for them. (Of course every visitor had to speak to me in the presence of military personnel.) Although I was very pleased to see all visitors, when I was released, I read the comments which some of the visitors made to the press (particularly government officials). I felt sad that we have a lot of dishonest, cold people who don’t care riding on someone’s tragedy for political capital. I want to believe that we are better than that, dear Ugandans.

Anyway, while at Makindye I was briefed that I was expected in court on 23rd August, about nine days after I was taken there. Some military doctors continued to come in to inject me, wash my wounds and give me pain killers. At night on two occasions, I was put into military vehicles and driven to Kampala Imaging Centre for scans. I could not object or even ask questions. I am worried because one of the machines seemed very dangerous. As soon as I was placed into it and it was switched on, the doctors ran to a safe distance and started seeing me from a small window. It was there that the radiologist told me how one of my kidneys and back had been damaged during the assault. I was however not given any written medical report by the military.

It was clear they wanted me to appear in better shape at the next time of my court appearance and they did everything possible to achieve that. A day or two at Makindye, this guy was candid. He told me it was in my interest to eat well, take in all the medicine and look better by 23rd or else they would not allow the press to see me and I would be remanded again until I was presentable enough! They even forcefully shaved my hair and beards. When I hesitated, this soldier told me, ‘gwe osaaga’ (You are kidding). Two of them held my hands from behind and shaved me by force. At some point, they insisted I must wear a suit for my next appearance before the court martial and asked me to tell my wife to bring me one. I also insisted that I did not have it. At another point I hesitated to allow some eye drops for my right eye which was very red and swollen. I always wanted to know what drugs I was being given. These guys held my arms from behind and one of them literally poured the entire bottle into my eye! Later, the military doctor also provided me with a crutch to aid me in walking. At that point, I was able to stand up, although with difficulty. When you hear all this you may think that all our soldiers are brutal. Far from that, most of them are wonderful people. There are many I interacted with during this ordeal who were extremely professional and sympathetic. It was hard to comprehend how people serving the same force, putting on the same uniform could be very different in appreciation and approach to a citizen of Uganda.

When I was taken back to Gulu on 23rd, I was very happy to see the people who came to court including family members, comrades in the struggle and lawyers. I cannot explain how I felt when the lawyer for the army said that charges of unlawful possession of firearms had been dropped. I did not feel vindicated. I was not excited. I was not moved. I just cannot explain how I felt. I just remembered what these people had done to me and tears came to my eyes. Shortly after, I was rearrested right in front of the courtroom and taken to Gulu prison. At the military prison, I was wearing a red uniform – this time, I was given a yellow one.

Friends, you cannot believe that you can be happy to be in prison but that day I was. I was very happy to leave solitary military confinement and meet up with colleagues who were being held at the Gulu prison. That night I was taken to Lachor hospital in Gulu- other tests and scans were conducted. At that point I was feeling better, especially psychologically since I had reunited with my comrades in the struggle.

Later that night the prison authorities decided to take me into the sickbay as opposed to staying with the other comrades. The other comrades led by Hon. Wadri protested. I could hear them bang the doors of their cell. The following day I was allowed to stay with them. The following day I was allowed to stay with them. This is when I interacted with the other 32 colleagues who had been arrested in the Arua fracas. Being in the same prison ward with Hon. Gerald Karuhanga, Hon. Paul Mwiru, Hon. Kassiano Wadri, Hon. Mike Mabike, John Mary Sebuufu and many other comrades made it feel like a boarding school. It was not a very happy reunion though. Because of the torture some of our comrades had been permanently injured. I cannot forget the pain which Shaban Atiku was going through. He spent every day and night groaning. The doctors had told him he would never walk again because his back had been permanently broken. Sadly, the world may never know him, but he will never go out of my mind. He would later collapse during a court session at Gulu. When I later met the women who were brutalised, it was very painful to see them and listen to their stories.

Many times we joked about the possibility of being hanged if the regime decided to give us the maximum penalty of the offence we had been charged with! This got many of our comrades silent.

Away from these sad moments, the overall prison leader had a box guitar in the ward and together we sang songs of freedom all night. This was the routine every night until we appeared before the Gulu High Court a few days later, for our bail hearing.

My next communication will be a vote of thanks to the world for the overwhelming support and comradeship. I will also talk about what I think we must do together to continue this struggle for liberty and freedom.

I am glad that authorities finally have bowed to your pressure and #HonZaake has been given bond to travel for urgent specialised treatment and I join the world to demand authorities to #FreeEddyMutwe and other political prisoners. WE SHALL OVERCOME.

PS:
1. Please ignore calls from my phone number (0752013306). It was taken from me by soldiers and am told they’re using it to call my friends pretending it is me.

2. Please ignore any communication from other social media accounts and pages under my name apart from this one (with a blue tick) and my verified twitter account (also with a blue tick).

Hon. Kyagulanyi Ssentamu aka Bobi Wine

Reduce the age people can get their NSSF savings


By Denis Jjuuko

Sometime back, a friend who had been out of employment for many years had a problem. His house was being sold by the bank after failure to continuously pay the monthly installments as a result of a mortgage he had taken when he was still employed. The money obtained from the bank had been used to improve the very house that was now being sold.

While he was still employed, he was a contributing member of the National Social Security Fund (NSSF) where 5% of his salary was chopped off before the employer contributed 10% to make it 15% in monthly savings. The money was enough to pay off the bank and save his house. However, he was below 50 years old and therefore NSSF couldn’t give him his money to save the house. The house was eventually sold on the cheap.

The only real asset the majority of people will ever have is their house. Nothing much else. The money they earn goes into paying fees for kids and survival. Yet the money with NSSF cannot help you unless you are 50 year old and above. And there lies one of the problems with the forced saving scheme. Of course NSSF argues that it doesn’t make laws. It is parliament to make that change. And parliament doesn’t contribute to NSSF so they have less interest in the scheme.

There is an ongoing TV campaign by NSSF oddly named Friends with Benefits where somebody who got their money and used it ‘properly’ can win Shs30m. I have watched a few episodes of the current season as it is now annual. The majority of the contestants have used their money to start new ventures. Some have started food cottage industries, others boda boda business, and all sorts of enterprises. This is problematic for those saving and the country generally.

The reason money is given to people who turn 50 years old and above is basically to enable them retire with respect so that they don’t become destitute, begging from one child to another as is usually the case. Instead, the people who get this money go on to start businesses. These are people who, because of age, are supposed to retire not to be running around starting a new business they ideally have not much experience of.

However much one does research while starting a business, there are certain things that one will have to learn on the job. And most businesses are very profitable on paper. Most business plans show profitability at a certain stage. The reality is most times very different due to mainly market and other forces that are sometimes hard to foresee. Although, there is no age at which one can’t start a business and it thrives, success is built over a period of time of very hard work. Of course some of the most successful entrepreneurs started very late in life but they aren’t many. At 50 years and above, there is less flexibility. You are used to doing things in a certain way and therefore change is hard. So if you worked in an office all your life, got your money at 55 and started a new business, the chances of succeeding are very minimal.

In fact at 50 and above, somebody should be concentrating on what they know best. They have matured and have acquired the necessary experience and acumen to succeed in a certain field. Even seasoned businessmen rarely go into new businesses after 50. Their focus is to grow what they have been doing all along. They know that they can’t simply enter into new fields and succeed. Don’t get me wrong, there will always be outliers who defy the norm. The majority of people who start a demanding enterprise like food production or boda boda at 55 will not succeed. There are also very few Ugandans who have started businesses with lots of money and succeeded.

So since people who retire go to starting business ventures that are competitive, there is need to lower the age where one can receive their money to about 40 when one chooses to. So that those who want to do business can do it when they still have the energy, the drive and guts needed to succeed.

At 40, a person has a few years to learn their new trade and master it. They are also still flexible enough to make changes if things don’t work. They have an option to go back into employment as well should things fail which option is not available to a 55 year old.

Money could even be given in installments where at 40 one qualifies to withdraw 50% of their savings to start a business. The other 50% could be kept until one is 55 as the law is now. That would actually ensure that the person isn’t testing the depth of the river with both feet.

The law should also allow anybody who hasn’t been working for sometime pay off their mortgage using their NSSF savings instead of the bank selling the house on the cheap. Otherwise, there is no need in saving. Like NSSF’s commissioned TV show has revealed, the people who are retiring are simply going into business or actually becoming hustlers in Kampala speak. So it is better that people become hustlers at a younger age and if their businesses grow, they will still save with NSSF. They will also be ambassadors for the fund. It benefits NSSF and the country in the long term if people can get their money before they retire to do business and create jobs or save the only real asset they will ever have.

The author is a media consultant and businessman. djjuuko@gmail.com. 0758111409

Studios (Mizigo) offer better investment returns than bigger houses


Studios (Mizigo) offer better investment returns than bigger houses

By Denis Jjuuko

One of my former landlords used to brag that she builds her houses like she would live in them. That if she didn’t fancy the house herself, she wouldn’t rent it out. Her houses are very spacious and although she doesn’t do as much as she promises, at least she tries. I have also met many people with similar views. They build houses for rent as if they will ever live in them. They spend on a lot of stuff that those who rent won’t really treasure like expensive chandeliers and polished porcelain.

A lot of times, rent is determined by the number of bedrooms and of course the location. A two bedroom house that is so spacious may not be rented at a much more rate than one that isn’t so extravagant. When I lived in my landlord’s so spacious houses, I was paying the same amount others were charging in that part of Kampala. So technically, the other guys were making more money than my landlord because in Kampala, residential houses aren’t charged per square feet. Actually, there is much more money in smaller houses than big ones. This is because unless your house is in one of those top suburbs, you will get very low returns. Even in the top suburbs, apartments are coming up.

It is cheaper to live in an apartment than a stand alone house in its own perimeter wall as that comes with extra costs such as security and garden maintenance. On an apartment block, there are many tenants that it may not be easy for thieves to break in like it is in a house in its own perimeter wall that you lock and go away.

The other issue with big houses that may not be in Kampala’s exclusive suburbs is that those who occupy them have more financial needs than people who live in small apartments. If you rent a big house, you most likely have a big family. And nobody will pay rent ahead of school fees for the kids. So the landlord becomes secondary. People who live in apartments especially the smaller ones don’t have as much financial needs or don’t consider themselves to have them.

So rentals that are meant for one person (studios) and one bedroom ones have much more returns than those that are three bedrooms or stand alone houses. This is because they attract bachelors who recently got their first or second job and eager to leave their parents or guardians’ homes. Their money is for them to enjoy and once in a while contribute to social causes. They have no problem paying six months rent in advance. In some parts of Kampala, a one bedroom apartment is charged a small percentage lower than a two bedroom flat. Studios charge as much as one bedroom apartments.

Such people also keep houses in better conditions as they have no kids to spoil the walls and plumbing. If it is a girl, she may even spend weeks without sleeping there as she may be having a boyfriend where she spends more time. Such people don’t usually use charcoal to cook. So houses are kept in good conditions as opposed to those that attract families.

In fact, there is more money in single rooms commonly referred to as Mizigo than the fancy apartments people like to build. They cost less to put up and aren’t kept empty for months if one tenant left. The people who can afford them are many and they don’t make outrageous demands like Kampala’s ‘corporate class’! Of course owning them may not make you become the most admired guy at your social club but as a business, they offer good returns. The only challenge with them could sometimes be management as a tenant may leave at anytime. So a lot of times a manager is necessary to put them in line.

So this may not be an option really for established real estate owners as they may be building for other reasons such as prestige and self actualization. If you are starting out and you want to make a quick return on investment, the Mzigos or at worst studios offer better alternatives. And the beauty with studios is that if the location is accessible, you can quickly turn them into lodges and/or list them on AirBnB for those interested in short term stays.

The writer is a communication and visibility consultant. djjuuko@gmail.com

Mutesa, Prince Mutebi survive angry elephants


Mutesa, Prince Mutebi survive angry elephants

“The Mengo set” was how we came to be known, frequently in a derogatory way: meaning the people who were recognised as the Kabaka’s personal friends, and who some considered were a bad influence on him.

This was unjust to the majority of us because we were not in a position to influence him one way or the other, even if we had wanted to, but there were a few ready to dabble in politics, and even to my simple mind, it was obvious that they were ruled by wishful thinking as opposed to the realities of modern politics on a national scale.

Seeing the Kabaka’s return from exile as a major victory over the mighty British government, these folks, mostly young men of the Kabaka’s generation, expected to go on winning until the kingdom was an independent state.

They were wilfully blind to what was happening outside the Lubiri. They dismissed as fanciful the significant body of Baganda professionals engaged in politics which aimed at independence for a united Uganda.

The Kabaka listened to his cronies instead of taking advantage of the widespread support from the rest of Uganda gained at the time of his exile.

Rather than foster good public relations with the other kingdoms and districts, he was lulled into the belief that a document known as the 1900 Agreement, contracted between one of his forefathers and the British Government, safeguarded Buganda’s right to remain a sovereign state. Later events proved him very wrong.

In some ways, it was easy to understand this complacency, which only really deserted him at the eleventh hour.

The court was still run on lines which were not much altered from what they had been when the first Europeans arrived in Uganda, as the kingdom was called before giving its name to encompass the surrounding regions.

Indeed, it still applied solely to the kingdom as recently as the early part of the reign of Mutesa’s father, Daudi Chwa II, for a framed scroll from the Church Missionary Society, on a wall of the reception room in the Old Twekobe, hailed him as the first Christian king of Uganda.

The princesses always sat to the right of the Kabaka, with Princess Mpologoma seated nearest to him. They were also addressed as “Ssebo”, meaning sir as opposed to madam, a form of address common to all men whether water-carrier or king.

Wives, that is, women who had borne the Kabaka’s children, and there were quite a few of them, came next, with special deference given to a woman who while she had not produced either a prince or princess, and was now married with a young family of her own, had been the virgin who custom decreed was made available to the Kabaka at some stage after he reached puberty, probably immediately before his marriage, to confirm his manhood.
Just as anything or anybody on Kabaka Anj’agala (the Kabaka loves/wants me), the tree lined avenue sweeping between the Lubiri and the New Bulange, traditionally became the Kabaka’s property, should he care to claim it, every woman in the palace was deemed to belong to him while she was there. I can’t say that I ever saw him take advantage of this ancient right.

The princes were more informal as to where they placed themselves, and generally sat among any visitors who happened to be there.

Everybody except the Kabaka, sat sideways on the floor, and knelt whenever he entered or left the room, as well as when one was addressed by him.

Eliva Kiggundu, who was then Secretary to the Kabaka’s Council of Ministers, and Ernest Sempebwa, both impressed upon me that kneeling to the Kabaka was out of respect for the crown as the institution topping the pyramid formed by the administrative and social structure that had for centuries made the kingdom unique in the whole of Africa.

Bidding the Kabaka goodbye was also taboo. You had to be very good at reading the signals when he disappeared: he might have been only going to the loo or to make a phone call when, mumbling “‘I’ll see you later”, he strolled away.

If anybody tried to take formal farewell of him, they were put off with a few vague words, which often kept them hanging about until some kind soul informed them that His Highness had gone to bed or was no longer in the palace.

Another inconvenience was that nobody, except young children, in the palace, was allowed to eat before the Kabaka had taken food and he was one of those people who can work for a full day without giving a thought to as much as a cup of tea.

The staff in his private office were used to starving. However, anybody drafted in to help, as I was more and more immediately before the independence talks got underway, suffered dehydration besides feeling weak hunger as the day wore on.

It didn’t help that a drink, usually gin and tonic was offered at the end of the working day, which could be any hour after eleven at night, when the Kabaka absently responded to Sarah’s demands that he take dinner, and the workers were allowed to go home.

I used to return to my house slightly high and unable to eat the food faithfully kept warm for me.

The most important person in the Kabaka’s household, apart from Kabaka himself and the Kabejja, was a white- headed old gentleman called Firimala.

I often wonder what happened to him when Obote’s troops shot up the Lubiri, for Firimala belonged to a by-gone age.

Like so many of his social class, meaning the rich landed gentry, as a boy, he had been sent by his family as a page at the court of Daudi Chwa II, to learn court etiquette, and risen to be the person in charge of the pages, the wine cellar and the housekeeping.

Normally, many of the pages, went on to climb the ladder leading from minor chief to Ssaza or county chief, or received government appointments.

Firimala was benign and gentle with the people of whom he approved; he guided me over many pitfalls. But, and there are no other words for it, he had it in for people whom he considered drank too much, laughed too loudly, and showed too much leg.

The taboo
A display of knee was anathema to him. He still lived in the days when to show an ankle was a punishable act.

I know just how punishable, because old Musa, the gardener of the Mukasa family, who was well into his 80s, was scarred from neck to heels as a result of the beating with elephant grass he received for running as a palace page during the infamous Mwanga’s reign and displaying his ankles and the calves of his legs.

Firimala’s form of punishment was hardly as drastic, but the expression on his face, and a certain something in his attitude towards offenders put them beyond the pale.

It was enough for others in the vicinity to curb their own lower instincts and behave quite cowardly in pretended disapproval.

We shamelessly did this because, although it may have been pure coincidence, people out of favour with that old man were seldom again seen at any private parties in the palace.

Through Firimala, I grew to know how the respective clans had adjusted their traditional court functions to the necessities of the day.

For instance, members of the Buffalo Clan, for generations the Kabaka’s personal bearers in that it was their job to carry the monarch on their shoulders on ceremonial occasions, were updated to become his chauffeurs.

Similarly, [another] clan, which was allowed to prepare his food, continued to supply the cooks in his kitchens [the Fox clan prepares the Kabaka’s food on special occasions such as coronation ].

And the Rain Clan still brought the Kabaka’s drinking water from their special well, the water from which was the exclusive right of kings.

When the Kabaka appeared on the throne, it was set on magnificent leopard and lion skins, which could only be handled by members of the Ngeye Clan.

During the Kabaka’s exile, the Ngeye Clan refused to produce the skins for Governor Cohen to stand on over while he addressed the Lukiiko, and this act of defiance resulted in the clan leader spending some time in prison.

Yet another clan were responsible for looking after Lutembe, the sacred crocodile, at the bay off Lake Victoria, while she lived.

She would come and be hand-fed when called by a member of the clan, and she was no legend: the photographer and travel writer, Cherry Kearton, who knocked about East Africa during the 20s and 30s of this century, has a picture of Lutembe in his book Cherry Kearton’s Travels (the old crocodile looks astonishingly pleasant!) and describes meeting Kabaka Daudi Chwa II, who was on his way home from a visit to Lutembe.

Prince Henry Kimera, a younger brother of the Kabaka, clearly recalls being taken as a child to Lutembe Bay and together with his sister riding on her back.

According to history, Lutembe was always so obliging. She is supposed to have been useful to Kabaka Mwanga, Mutesa’s grandfather, in disposing of his enemies.

In the 1940s, when a crocodile cropping exercise was underway, Lutembe’s affinity with mankind cost her her life. She must have provided the easiest of shots.

The clan responsible for her claimed that another tame crocodile had replaced Lutembe, but there was a big rush to introduce the royal children to the replacement.

While there were many other clan connections with the royal family and household, all of them enjoyed more significant links with the Kabakaship. Unlike most African dynasties, Buganda had no royal clan.

The Kabakas were of their mothers’ clans: Mutesa II belonged, through his mother to the Cow Clan, while his sons by the Lady Sarah, and his daughter by the Nabaeereka, belonged to the Monkey Clan, and his children by miscellaneous wives also belonged to the clans of their respective mothers; the rest of Baganda society became members of their fathers’ clans.

Because the Kabaka down through the ages took wives from practically every clan; (as a matter of fact the monkey clan was barred to them, since a monkey clan elder acted as the Kabaka’s father at the coronation, and this rendered any union with a Monkey clan member incestuous), every clan at one time or another, had blood tie in the form of princes or princesses with the Kabakaship.

Until the Christian practice of acknowledging only off-spring from an officially recognised union, many clans could hope to see one of their princes succeed to the throne.

In the rough old days, the princes themselves must have been more than anxious to succeed and not solely from political ambition; when a prince was selected to become Kabaka, the rest were put to death to save any argument.

As the embodiment of the Kiganda clan system, one of the Kabaka‘s main titles was Ssabatakka, Head of Clans, and it was in this capacity that his judgement was sought by people frustrated by the traditional judicial system or simply unable to accept a Buganda Government judge’s ruling.

Litigation was food and drink to the majority of the population, besides being a good source of entertainment to folks who had nothing better to do than pass the time in court.
Land disputes made up the bulk of the court cases, although disputed wills came a close second.

The Ham Mukasa Will was a cause celebre for years, and at the end, nobody was very sure who came out on top.

Ham Mukasa, who died at the age of nearly 100, was a Christian page at the court of Mwanga I, and managed to escape from being among the youngsters who were burnt alive for keeping their faith and their chastity, and subsequently cannonised as the Uganda Martyrs.
He lived to become one of Buganda’s greatest statesman. He outlived his first wife who produced quite a large family, then married again and had another family. Ham Mukasa died while we were still living on Rubaga Hill.

I remember passing his house, a huge, low, rambling place set back from the Rubaga Road, when word had got out that the old man was dying.

The grounds were packed with silent people, and at night the verandah was hung with lanterns.

Before the end came, the Kabaka visited. He went as an ordinary Muganda, not as a king, so there was no fuss.

The fuss came later. The Will was alleged by one side of the family to be either a forgery or altered since being reliably witnessed.

Accusations of foul play flew thick and fast. Forget what was happening on the political scene; everybody was scanning the newspapers for the latest revelation about the Ham Mukasa Will.

Practically, every family of note was involved, showing how determinedly wealth was kept through convenient marriages within the confines of the elite. A good opera script writer would have made millions out of the emerging scandals.

On the lawn outside the Old Twekobe, was a large well-built kennel with a good sized run fenced in with iron railings. The Kabaka’s pet baboon was the present occupant, but the kennel had formerly housed his leopard.

For such an intrepid hunter, the Kabaka was paradoxically a collector of exotic pets, and he was genuinely fond of them.

Besides the baboon, two buffalo calves roamed Lubiri with one of his herds of cattle. Now and again a couple of small deer could be glimpsed, and there was a horse of his which was always in the company of a bedraggled crested crane.

The baboon, however, was undoubtedly the star attraction. When it was out of the cage, it was never on a leash or chain, and occasionally it would find its way to our offices, suddenly appearing at a window and making a grab for whatever was within reach.

Its keeper patiently did his best to lure it home with pieces of fruit, and when he did manage to pick the animal up, it screeched at the top of its voice. The fault was mine, I think.

Every time I paid a daytime visit to the Old Twekobe, I used to spend some time with the baboon and feed it Vicks Lozenges, my own favourite sweets.

If I stayed away for any length of time, say while His Highness was away hunting, the poor thing came looking for me and the Vicks Lozenges.

According to Prince Henry Kimera, the leopard, a female, and two lions – a male and a female, had been the Kabaka’s favourites in the 1940s, when he was studying at Makerere University.
Personally, I find this intriguing in view of his well-known dread of cats.

The Kabaka once visited our house at a time when our cat, Cleopatra, had given birth to several kittens and mother and offspring had to be locked away before he would step inside.

However, his leopard and lions seem to have been remarkably tame and enjoyed full freedom in the palace.

The leopard in particular, travelled in the back of his car, her paws on his shoulders, as he drove himself there and back from Makerere, and all three animals were regularly fed with cake at tea time.

They were treated like domesticated dogs, in that people familiar to them could fondle them, although nobody, on the Kabaka’s orders, was to allow the leopard and lions to lick their hands.

This novel state of affairs was horribly shattered during one of Uganda’s characteristic heavy thunderstorms.

A child ran for shelter in one of the many tiny mud huts dotting the Lubiri grounds, and one of the lions chased after it.

Naturally, the child panicked and screamed, and the lion attacked, resulting in the child’s death.

It was later suggested that the keeper was lax in not confining the animal along with the other two during the storm, and that none had been fed at the usual time.

Whatever the reasons behind the tragedy, the Baganda were angry and demanded the killing of all three animals.

The Kabaka himself carried out the distressing job of leading the lions into their compound and shooting them. But he refused point blank to destroy the leopard.

She accompanied him to Britain when he continued his studies at Cambridge, and was donated to Whipsnade Zoo where she unfortunately perished in a flu epidemic.

At a guess, he might well have become an enthusiastic conservationist, as opposed to being a hunter, because his interest in wildlife extended beyond the killing.

Had somebody taught him to use a camera instead of a gun, his skills in tracking wild animals might have been put to more rewarding use.

His desire to observe them from as close as possible often gave rise to protests within certain sections of the Baganda. They accused him of taking undue risks.

Apart from that, people invited to go hunting with him saw the honour as dubious.

You had to be a James Lutaya or a Robert Ntambi, both of them avid hunters, to appreciate the trek on foot through thorny bush, the ban on smoking and use of soap for washing, and the dreary cold food; a fire for cooking, like cigarette smoke and soap, would give off an alien scent in the bush. A royal hunt was certainly no picnic.

His critics failed to understand his rare gift for immediately coming to terms with animals, and they with him. And criticism rose after it was leaked sometime in 1960 that he had taken his son, Prince Mutebi, then aged 5, on an elephant hunt.

A herd of these majestic beasts was discovered within walking distance of the Kabaka’s camp, and, unarmed, he took the child to see them.

Several members of the hunting party followed at a distance, and were horrified to see the Kabaka and his son standing about fifty feet away from the placidly grazing herd.

Some of the elephants glanced briefly in the direction of the Kabaka and Mutebi, but seemed not to mind them.

It was only after the followers drew attention to themselves that the animals grew restive, and one frightened and misguided person fired a shot which, incidentally, passed through the leg of the Kabaka’s trousers.

Consequently, there was a mad stampede of elephant, carefully by-passing the Kabaka and the small boy.

Other members of the royal family were gifted in different ways. Not so much the princesses who, even when married, spent a lot of their time congregating and chatting to each in the Old Twekobe.

But Prince Kimera qualified in Britain as a Royal Air Force pilot, and Prince Ndawula was a talented photographer working with the Uganda Information Office.

The most interesting prince of all was Prince Joseph, an uncle of the Kabaka, who always looked as though he had wandered into the palace straight from working on his farm.

His English was impeccable, despite his never having been abroad, and some of the results of the experiments carried out on his farm earned the respect of the Agriculture Department.

Among the Baganda, however, Prince Joseph was famous for his portrait of Mutesa I.

Mutesa I died in 1884, long before Prince Joseph was born, and the portrait, probably Africa’s first Identikit composite, was produced from verbal descriptions given by some of the old princesses who remembered the man.

It is said that the portrait took 15 years to complete, because the old ladies never stopped arguing over the shape of various features.

Since they must have been either dead or going senile by the time the portrait was finished, there could not have been anybody in a position to say how good a likeness it was.

SOURCE: SUNDAY MONITOR

The historical deaths that rocked Buganda Kingdom


Group portrait made at Ham Mukasa’s house in Nasuti. Without Ham Mukasa and with governor Andrew Cohen

BY G.H.K VIA UGANDANS AT HEART forum

I grew up hearing a lot about the great Baganda chiefs including this late Oweekitiibwa Ham Mukasa. His death was a real shocker to the entire Buganda Kingdom. He was a person associated with many things including the building of King’s College Buddo and the donation of huge expanses of land on which many leading institutions in Mukono are constructed. His death, before we heard it on the then Uganda Broadcasting Service, had just been brought to our notice by the Ssaza Chief ( County chief ) of Mawokota County ( Mpigi district) where at that time my late dad was the Deputy Ssaza Chief, and I was a primary school kid. So whenever the Ssaza chief returned from his safari he would stop at our place and give a brief to dad.It was on that similar occasion that we all heard him say in Luganda : Kitalo nnyo mwattu, Omukulu Ham Mukasa afudde!

Then the two chiefs together with their spouses made arrangements to attend the funeral at Namirembe Cathedral. We the children stayed behind.On their return they told us many things about what they qualified as a very triumphant funeral that assembled thousands of people and hundreds of vehicles. Africans, europeans, and Asians attended the event. And it was indeed a very historic funeral. The aggrieved Kingdom which had just celebrated Kabaka Muteesa II’s very much triumphant welcome from exile and his glorious visit to all Buganda’s counties just a couple of months earlier, continued to land in a spate of further episodes of grief with the deaths of other eminent personalities almost all in the same period ( 1956 – 1957). Buganda was very much saddened with the death of the Kabaka’s mum, Lady Irene Drussila Namaganda who passed away in a London hospital where she had been sent for treatment. Her body was brought back for burial in the compound of Namirembe Cathedral. As soon as it arrived at Entebbe it was taken to the Cathedral for the official funeral service which was attended by the Kabaka, the Governor, and other prominent personalities including religious leaders such as Bishop J. Kiwanuka (then Bishop of Masaka). It was public holiday in Buganda Kingdom but there was no classical wake that invoves an all night watch with lamentations due to the fact that the chief mourner was naturally supposed to be the Kabaka, but whom tradition bars from mourning. So things went on almost as rapidly as possible but in very deep sorrow judging by the overall reaction in the Kingdom and at the Cathedral where countless thousands assembled. the entire neighbourhood acted as a parking lot for the estimated 900 vehicles that transported mourners from all over Buganda.

“Canon Apolo, a great Native Missionary & Pigmee Elders”
Card published by East African Standard, Nairobi. Photograph by Dr. A.T. Schofield. 1930s?


Several hours after the sealed coffin had been lowered in the deep grave whose construction was still in motion some Baganda officials, eager to ascertain that the body in the coffin was that of Lady Irene Namaganda took to the formal but private opening of the coffin. And they shed away their doubts when they gazed at the body of the great Lady who was well-embalmed and well-dressed in a silk dress with the hands perfectly in white gloves. And there arose a murmur of delight for proposals to thank the British Government for this honesty!

More or less in the very same period another great lady passed away in a convent in the USA. This was the great Reverend Mother Kevin, popularly known in the entire East African region as Maama Kevina. She was a very much beloved nun who founded the leading institutions at Nkokonjeru, Nsube,Naggalama, and Nsambya Hospital and the very prestigious Mt St Mary’s College Namagunga! She also founded two religious congregations which
are very active in the region. She built a leprosy centre and a school for the blind. She died at 82 in an American convent where she had retired. She was first buried there before she was subsequently re-buried in her native Ireland. On learning the news of her death which spread like forest fire in Africa plans were made to exhume her body and bring it to Uganda for funeral at Nkokonjeru. One of the initiators of this idea was the then Katikkiro of Buganda
Mr Michael Kintu who at the time of Mother Kevin in Nkokonjeru had once been the ggombolola chief ( sub-county chief ) of the area. My late mum who was at that time a student at Nkokonjeru / Nsube told us that the first time she saw Mr Michael Kintu was when he came as ggombolola chief to visit the place. It seems Kintu was impressed by Mother Kevin’s work and personality which inspired many in the area. When the idea went through thanks to
the many contributions made, the nun’s body was exhumed in Ireland and airlifted to Entebbe. Hundreds of people had pitched camp at the airport. There were tears and crying for dep sorrow as the coffin was moved from the plane and put on an ambulance. Over 100 cars lined in procession to follow the ambulance to Nsambya cathedral where a requiem mass was held in presence of the then Protectorate Governor of Uganda and other dignitaries.

From Nsambya another procession of vehicles, three miles long, accompanied the body to Nkokonjeru Convent where thousands of people had gathered, just as they had gathered all along the route from Mukono to Nkokonjeru! The body spent the night in the Sisters’ chapel. Many OGs of the place, including my mum, held an all-night watch in the chapel. The following day, after another Requiem Mass was the official burial in the convent’s cemetery.
Tens of thousands of people from all over East Africa turned up for the great send off whose impact created a special memorable image in many minds.

In and around Nkokonjeru this nun was usually addressed as a Ssebo ( Sir ) and not as a Nnyabo ( Madam ) ! This type of address to ladies is reserved only to princesses, the Kabaka’s queen ( Nabagereka ), and the Kabaka’s mum ( the Nnamasole ). The local population had indeed elevated Mother Kevin to great heights in appreciation of her contribution to their welfare and prosperity!

Death created another shocker in the demise of a great Buganda Minister of education, Hon Mr Kassim Male, the only Moslem Minister at Mmengo at that time. The whole Kingdom regretted this Buganda statesman who was trriumphantly buried by countless thousands of people. Mr Kassim Male was later to be replaced by young politician Abubaker Mayanja who had just finished his studies at Cambridge. This appointment was a great consolation to the Kingdom as well as especially to the Moslems whom Abubaker Mayanja represented so well in Mmengo.

Death continued to take its toll and Buganda continued with the mourning. This time it was the famous Omutaka Andreya Kyemwa (82) who had been a very notable chief in the Kingdom where he was county chief on many occasions, a Lukiiko member representing Mawokota County, an adviser to the Kabaka, and finally a Regent of Buganda Kingdom appointed by Muteesa towards the end of his exile in London.Kyemwa was also a pious Catholic
who was knighted with the Papal Order of St Gregory the Great! His death was a loss both to the Kingdom and to the Catholic Church.He was a family friend and we were very proud of him! He died at Lubaga Hospital one Monday morning and his body was brought home late in the afternoon. Thousands of mourners assembled there for the two days that preceded the funeral. The day Kyemwa was buried was decreed by the Kabaka as a public day of mourning. All offices in the then Buganda government were closed. Other crowds of mourners, again in their thousands, flocked to his village to attend the burial. Vehicles rolled in from every corner of the land. Dignitaries who included Bishop Kiwanuka, the Katikkiro of Buganda and many Buganda Ministers and very many chiefs and eminet personalities were very visibly present. And of course many members of the clergy including numerous priests of the White Fathers Society to which one of his sons and heir belonged. Omutaka Kyemwa who had the honour to host the Kabaka in his home when he came to visit Mawokota county after his return from exile ( 1955 ), was mourned everywhere in Buganda. And his death was a big blow to Mawokota county where he was once a notable county chief and where he retired as a respected figure of the region.

Now Kyemwa dead and buried, death stubbornly robbed the Kingdom of the person who had been a leading active mourner at Kyemwa’s home. This was the famous Hon Mr Rafaeli Kasule, the very first Speaker of the Buganda Lukiiko, who succumbed to a strong high blood pressure at Mulago Hospital where he had been driven in agony. Rafaeli Kasule was also a native of Mawokota County and his home was near Mitala Maria township. But on his death he was buried at Ggoli village near Ggoli Catholic Parish to which he had donated a lot of land. His burial took place on a Sunday and very many people turned up. Vehicles filled the vast entire parish compounds. From his Mitala Maria ( Buwama ) home to Ggoli the late’s body was accompanied by a very long procession of cars. There was a short service in the Church before the coffin was carried by notable personalities of the Engeye clan ( his clan). The distance from the church to the burial ground was about half a kilometer. Thousands of people including Katikkiro Michael Kintu and all Mmengo Ministers, Lukiiko members, Members of the Legco, and all kinds of chiefs followed the coffin. And there was a lot of emotional scenes when the coffin was lowered in the grave. And, on behalf of the members of the Engeye clan, Rev Père Karoli Lutwama, heir to the late Omutaka Andreya Kyemwa, paid a very touching tribute to the memory of Oweekitiibwa Rafaeli Kasule.So triumphantly was indeed Buganda Lukiiko’s first Speaker buried!

Another great departure that shocked so much the whole of Buganda was that of a very heroic Lukiiko member from Masaka, Mr Ssendikwanawa who was one of the founder pillars of DP in Masaka and one of the richest persons in Buganda. He was a coffee magnate marked for his colourful generosity.My parents attended his funeral in Kabwoko township. On their return back home they described the funeral as having been a real triumph with an attendance numbering countless thousands of people and an unusually large number of cars, lorries, and buses.

Sometime later, a great Buganda chief living in Mubende Town passed away. That was the famous Mukulu Ssenkaatuuka Kiyimba who had been a notable county chief in many places in Buganda. Ssenkaatuuka had lived Kabaka Mwanga’s days and was one of those who narrowly escaped Christian martyrdom. However Ssenkaatuuka had later on to undergo castration under Mwanga’s orders and he lived this dehumanization till death at 85. He had built a near palatial bungalow near Mubende city and he was buried in that same house. His funeral was a real glorious ceremony presided over by two bishops, Archbishop J.L. Cabana of Lubaga, and Bishop Joseph Kiwanuka of Masaka. He had willed a lot of land to the Church for special projects among which was the famous Ssenkaatuuka Fund to raise sponsorship for the education of the poor!

Another death which had to be felt as a real shock was that of Mrs Mulyanti, a pragmatic lady very well known in many circles. Thousands of people including my parents attended her funeral. News of her death was also brought to the attention of my father by the Ssaza Chief who was returning from his mission in Kampala. All chiefs at that time knew very well Mwami Mulyanti who had one time been a dynamic Chief of Kyaddondo county ( the Kaggo ).
And very many chiefs from all over Buganda were at the funeral.

Forumists recalling this 1956 / 1957 period can add more names on the list of the eminent personalities Buganda lost in that period! A very sad milestone in Buganda’s history because it marked a period that cost buganda of some of her very heroic individuals.

WAS MUSEVENI JUSTIFIED FOR GOING TO WAR AFTER THE 1980 ELECTIONS?


This picture is a detail of a photograph made at Iganga Primary School, September 1979, by Elly Rwakoma. But who is this photographer, calling for prayer for his country? And who can identify any of the individuals behind him?

By Peter Simon via UAH forum

I think Museveni was justified to go to the bush for his personal gains. He wanted to become a president and as the 1980 campaign trail showed, he had no chance of realizing his ambition through the ballot so the only option left was via fighting. That is what justifies his move, to gain what he wanted but NOT for the reasons he publicly claimed to have motivated them to fight.

That is why he stated that if he lost the elections, he would go to the bush; he saw the lose coming, we saw it coming and celebrated as it drew closer, it sent panic waves to UPM supporters some of whom were and have remained my friends though we constantly disagree with one another; I am a liberal man!

Karamagi Andrew writes to Wanyama Don Innocent


Dear Wanyama Don Innocent,

My friend Yasiin Kawuma’s life was brutally ended last night in the same way that many innocent Ugandan lives have been ended by your blood thirsty master, Yoweri Museveni, and I realize that I could have very easily been the one sitting at the steering wheel of that vehicle for reasons I’ll give in subsequent paragraphs of this crier de coeur to you.

Whenever I have the time, I regularly offer to drive my friends who are political leaders during campaigns, processions and/or long trips to and from the countryside for a number of reasons—some tactical, others strategic. At times, a candidate or leader needs to concentrate fully on planning for the day’s activities, sometimes their official drivers need to rest and on other occasions, it is a good gesture to make oneself available to assist a colleague by chauffeuring them about while they make speeches, meet their voters and chat with their campaign managers and so on.

In my modest experience volunteering for election processes so far, I can state, without any fear of contradiction, that the armed personnel that your masters deploy in elections are responsible for the shootings and injuries meted out against unarmed civilians. This has for long been a common feature of elections.

Examples abound:

When I volunteered for Brenda Nabukenya’s re-election in Luwero, the amount of gun violence that was wrought by Kayihura’s Police created a situation akin to civil war. Were the voters of Luwero pelting the president’s motorcade with stones?

During the Campaign for Free and Fair Elections in 2015, Mathias Mpuuga narrowly survived a bullet to the shoulder thanks to the quick reflexes of a young man who shoved him away into a nearby building whose wall exploded as the killer round shattered the brick and mortar. Was Mpuuga throwing stones at your master Museveni?

Without provocation, Mwijukye Francis, Kalema Shaban Senior, Nyanjura Doreen Nyanjura Doreen Amooti, Bobi Kyagulanyi were (and still are) routinely beaten and the former was once shot in the femur—were they ever found throwing stones at your president? How about the two-year-old baby Javiirah Nalwanga who was shot dead in Masaka by a “stray” bullet?!

In 2016 while a rampant Andrew Felix Kaweesi was all over Kampala arresting political party agents and grabbing declaration forms, three of his guards aimed their automatic weapons at myself and two journalists. None of us had thrown, much less picked up a stone…we were simply taking photos.

In the same year during the election for Ntungamo Municipality Member of Parliament, operators from the Special Forces were deployed and I remember seeing one soldier bludgeoning the motionless body of an old woman who was fleeing the violence—I have never been able to find out whether she survived the savage beating. Tell me Don, was this old woman also hurling stones at your president?

During the recent by-election in Jinja East where I volunteered for Mwiru Paul’s campaign, I was tasked by Gerald K Karuhanga to follow a vehicle that was transporting ballot boxes to the tally centre and ensure that the results aren’t tampered with along the way. A soldier pointed his gun at me in an effort to get me to stop trailing them. I got worried but continued following the car up to the tally centre. This was particularly risky because I was by myself and was driving in a secluded area of the township—had I been shot, they’d have accused me of having confronted them (like they have done with Yasiin) yet all I was doing was vote protection which is a legitimate part of electoral processes more so when rigging is the order of the day.

Barely two months ago, Asuman Basalirwa’s aide was, without provocation, shot dead in the course of a campaign rally. Did he also stone a presidential car?

The incidents are so many but with those few examples, it should be evident that the sole cause of election violence is the bloodlust and insatiable appetite for power that the regime you have sold your soul to possesses and will blindly pursue at any cost, including human life!

Your attempt at spinning the story by parading a damaged rear window of what you purport to be one of the cars on the presidential convoy is not only nauseating; it is manifestly lame and lacking.

While you go about your daily job of defending the indefensible, please rest assured that empires far greater than Museveni’s Junta have collapsed and are now in the dung heap of history, enveloped by infamy and disgrace.

Don’t follow this corpse to the grave my brother.

karamagiandrew@gmail.com.

The Presidential Candidate that Ugandans deserve.


By Dr.Edward Kayondo’ via Ugandans at Heart (UAH) Community

Fellow netters,

A presidential candidate that will win the hearts and minds of Ugandans to bring forth the so much needed change in leadership personnel will not raise from the activists flame and we have seen many hopes shuttered to prove this.

The following are the key factors I will look for in a presidential candidate that will spike my interest and excite me:

The same should clearly acknowledge and outline the positive changes or developments over the last several years even if the count might call for only one hand.

The same should promise to keep the integrity of the current system and make necessary countrywide civil servant changes overtime based on qualifications irrespective of tribal affiliations or the path of ascension to positions in question.

The same must emphasize rule of law not vengeance.

The same must acknowledge that all Ugandans are the same and have a right to privileges they qualify for.

The same must promise necessary changes and express visions based on current state not past or historical precedence.

The same must present developmental programs that are fully supported by teams of knowledgeable people in the field in question.

The same must present a progressive, coherent and detailed plan to the extent they can, addressing all government sectors in the country moving forward.

The same must be open to debate their visions and plans in a public forum when called for.

The same should have a supporting base rooted in a diverse political party or collation of independent fellow citizens.

The same must be chosen by fellow citizens in free and fair elections.

The same must be qualified as outlined in the constitution of the Republic.

The same must acknowledge the services offered by current leaders and propose ways and means through which their accumulated knowledge can be used for the best outcomes of the nation.

This is very depressing to say the least!


By Rev. Joseph Kamugisha

This is very depressing to say the least. As a matter of fact, iam reminded of a similar scenario which i witnessed during my one night stay at Nakasero SRB, during the days of monster Idi Amin.

A Kololo secondary school teacher was brought in the middle of the night, he was clearly identifiable, because we had some students from the same school who knew him very well. He was responsible for teaching Math and French. The man was mercilessly beaten, tied aganist the metal jail bars, in form of a cross. The notorious SRB henchmen, pulle dout their bayonets and started slashing his body exactly as the gluesome pic here below shows. Later in the middle of the night after he had bled so much, one of the goons came in with a pistol and shot him on each arm, legs and finally in the chest.

It’s an image i saw over forty years ago, but still vivid in my memory. If the saying, “History repeats itself…” Museveni, is a surely a good student of Idi Amin and more.

YVONNE CHAKACHAKA SPEAKS ON BOBI’S ARREST!


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*YVONNE CHAKACHAKA*
I have heard that my Nelson Mandela in Uganda has been brutally arrested, tortured & jailed illegally & due to face an illegal court martial. Dear Ugandans, it’s your right to help this boy. We South Africans have heard a lot of bad things about Uganda but believe with such good hearted people like my friend Bobi Wine everything can change. During our time, we didn’t have the social media but we changed South Africa. Right now, you have the social media so use it to free your Nelson Mandela. As for his wife Barbra Kyagulanyi, be strong. God will always protect you no matter what he goes through. Make it a habit of posting his pictures with a simple meaningful message every morning and evening. Trust me, every government is afraid of the pressure on social media. That’s why i heard that the big man there is taxing your social media. As for me, am going to create awareness in South Africa. Don’t lose hope. Hope is vital in every struggle. All those cases against him will go away.
*Oh Mama Africa!*

Official statement from Mengo government about the state of affairs in Uganda


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An update from Mrs.Kyagulanyi on her hubby in military detention


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By Barbie Kyagulanyi

Family, friends and well-wishers,

Today I went with lawyers and members of the Uganda Human Rights Commission to Makindye military prisons, and after many days I was able to see my husband with my own eyes. I am first of all thankful to God that he is still alive! Let’s continue to pray for him.
Bobi is in pain. Bobi is hurting EVERYWHERE. We nearly lost him! He wonders how he is still alive after such treatment.

Bobi cannot stand on his own. He has a swollen face- very deformed. At first sight, it is very unlikely that you would recognize him. You may not understand this unless if you see him. His forehead is bruised and his eyes are red. He has many wounds including one on his ear. He seems to have been punched many times on the face. He cannot walk. He was carried into the room where we saw him. He cannot sit straight. He speaks with difficulty and has a lot of pain breathing. He has great pain in the left side ribs and hip. He bled a lot through the ears and through the nose. Blood stains are still visible! He is in such a terrible state and in need of urgent medical attention. I could not believe that an innocent man can be taken through all this because he has a different political opinion.

According to his story, he was not even at the scene where chaos allegedly took place in Arua. He was with friends watching news at a restaurant when news came out that his driver had been shot dead. He quickly went into his room as gun shots raged on, and for many hours throughout the night, he kept hearing soldiers banging doors and breaking into rooms of the hotel. Later, the soldiers came to his room and broke into it. They found him standing in the room and the soldiers immediately ordered him to kneel down. Before he could reach the floor, one soldier hit his head with an iron bar and he fell down. They all descended on him, stepping on his head with boots and hitting him everywhere. He became unconscious thereafter and after so many hours, he realized that he was at the Arua airfield on handcuffs. He can’t tell what they might have done to him during that time. After gaining consciousness, he was given many injections and has no idea what they were for. They took him to Gulu where he was detained. He can hardly remember what took place in court yesterday as he was only regaining consciousness. He was later airlifted to Makindye where he is being detained. I have seen many victims of torture- never have I seen anyone in the state which Bobi is in! When he narrates these stories, you see the kind of trauma he is going through. When you set your eyes on him, you cannot help but wonder what kind of human beings can do such things to a fellow human being.

Here is the good news- Bobi is strong at heart. His resolve has not diminished. His bones have been broken, but his spirit has not been crushed. He is still the husband I met many years ago. He knows that he is innocent of all that he is being accused of. His only crime is standing for justice and for trying to speak for the common person. He was surprised when we told him that he is accused of possessing firearms- he was hearing about this for the first time. Instead, the soldiers who arrested him took away his wallet and the money he had on him. He wonders why he is being tried by military courts! But he knows that this is part of the price he has to pay for what he believes in. He asks Ugandans to remain firm, even in the face of such repression.

He is deeply hurt by his driver, Yasin Kawuma’s death and very sad that he was not allowed to bury him! We told him about the dire health condition of Hon. Francis Zaake and others, and he sent sympathies.

He asked me to be strong for the sake of our children and I promised him that I am strong and I will remain strong. I told him how many people in Uganda and abroad are very concerned about him and he asked me to appreciate you all on his behalf.

Our request is that he is urgently allowed to access his doctors so that he gets the much needed medical attention. Especially since he highly suspects that he underwent internal bleeding.

May God’s angels be with you Bobi in that military facility where I am not. May the God of heaven fight this battle for you and for all of us.

Barbie Kyagulanyi
17th August, 2018

FREE BOBI WINE DEMO- TORONTO, CANADA


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Christianity in Canada is no more as churches are empty on Sundays!


Gwokto La’Kitgum

By Peter Gwokto La’Kitgum VIA UAH FORUM

Canada, this country has its two balls squeezed tight by both Islam and Jews. Rest of us with foreign names are as confused as bees surprised by a fire and smoke in a beehive when a queen bee us left to fend for herself.

Rest of us are tissues left with no supply routes in as far as ideas on resolving their (muslims/jewush) hitherto foreign conflicts. Even the land’s owners – Natives – have scattered away from their concentration camps to blend in.

Canadian policies regarding Muslim-Jewish conflicts are so warped that government itself has none. The can hurl nasty hateful words at one another flying over our heads and all we do is duck as they explode over our heads.

That’s the Canadian way to peaceful resolutions. Silence, according to one of Shakespeare’s works, can speak according to circumstances. There are a zillion Black sheep among Canadian Jews and Muslims.

Christianity in Canada is no more. Traditional Christian churches such as Catholic and Anglican churches are empty. Some have turned into nightclubs. The few that squeal at odd hours are reformed pentecostal and the likes run by baboon daylight robbers preaching nothing else but coming doom and apocalypse. It’s amazing how a devoted African Christian finds himself suddenly with no where to pray except his crib. That also marks the end of one’s faith and yet in Africa we literally adore and admire white preachers not knowing their wells in the west have all run dry.

Nevertheless, we can only hope muslims and Jews tear out their share of balls and leave us alone in whether in peace or pieces.

Peter is Ugandan living in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Land in Acholi is the most expensive in the country


Acholi Men dancing

BY AKIM ODONGO VIA UAH FORUM

If it was not for the poor leadership to date, Uganda would have been way ahead of most African countries. As we speak, there are Ugandan entrepreneurs, who have against all odds have made it big, Some are held back by fear of surpassing the leading elites. Infact, i dare say that among them there are Acholis who have overcome the discrimination and and outright animosity from the current regime to do great things.

Despite the vast land in Acholi, per acreage, land in Acholi is the most expensive in the country.In large scale farming, Acholi exceeds all the regions.All this should count for something. That the people are able except for the leaders who simply shoot their way to power and end up not knowing what to do.

I don’t know much about the people in the diaspora, but one thing i know is that the money they remit home is sustaining the limping economy of Uganda and better still the people in the diaspora have taken advantage of free education and as such first generation Ugandans are well equipped, many matching George Okello’s number of degrees. These are the brains that should be fuelling Ugandans progress if it was not for the leadership, who feel threaten and now they have come up with some dubious exercise regarding duel citizenship, an attempt to throw to frustrate Ugandans children who are ready to take their knowledge back home. Smart leadership would given them incentives to entice them home lakini wapiiii!. That is why i think Acholi would benefit more with federalism because our need for federalism is not about “King and us”, but about progress, rule of law, and better still freedom to excel. Acholi at the moment is being held back!

Wwat Uganda needs is good leadership, one that is educated and follows world trend. What we currently have is village material who has no respect for the constitution and who is willing to lie through the teeth, who aids and abets corruption. Take a look at the way MPs are falling over themselves to rip apart the very constitution that they voted for. What hope is there for the country if the leaders can take bribes without shame? I am with Bobi Wine on this. I hope he does not turn out to be another of those you cannot trust.

The actual net problem of Uganda is its population.


73% of Ugandans don’t wash hands

BY EDWARD MULINDWA VIA UAH FORUM

Well, we have a population in Uganda let us critique it to understand how valuable is the population in a national development. Although too many out there love to go after Uganda leaders, the actual net problem of Uganda is its population. The population of Uganda is utter useless, and has failed inside Uganda as it has failed in diaspora. Many Ugandans immigrated into Boston,USA, way back before even Amin came to power, how powerful is Uganda community in Boston? They have sadly started to fly home for they simply cannot fit into senior citizen homes during their retirement age, did they fail to invest for their future due to Iddi Amin’s brutality or for Museveni is a Rwandese? I am not going to dwell so much on Ugandans in diaspora, let us candidly dissect the population at home.

One of the ‘protected camps’ in northern Uganda when it was still populated

Northerners, Karamojong’s, Bakiga and Easterners are a bunch of lazies, that love free things. Let us start with Northerners, they are sitting on the most fertile land on the entire African continent, Acholi and Langi own a plateau that is more fertile than the Buganda soil, stand up and explain to me how they have put a value into it. If only a single Acholi/Langi brain stood up and used that land intelligently, Northern Uganda would have by today been able to feed the entire refugee population in Africa. In 2017 they are still living in huts, they shit on the jungle, and a very few smart thieves like Adoko Nekyon that can loot, live in Kololo and smile for they are smart. It is interesting, there is a war in the North right now, and do you know what they are fighting for? It is the land, do not touch it and never touch it. They will fight to death for that land, a mass they have sat on for decades and failed to utilize. Stupidity has absolutely no climax. Karamojong are sitting on Alivio gold yet they did not wear clothes until when Iddi Amin declared a war on Karamojong walking naked. What I have written on Acholi & Langi matches word for word for Bakiga and Easterners.

The second problem Uganda has today is that it owns a single tribe in the center called Baganda that make almost 7 million people, of whom almost 95% are dumn. Now that is a very bold statement, allow me five minutes to factually back it sir.

Although Buganda was established way before the protection of the British, it stalled its growth for its population is stupid. They have a land that is fairly fertile, they have the highest fertility rate, they own an administrative structure since God knows when, yet Buganda goes nowhere to today when it has reached a point of assimilation. The last number I saw was 75% of babies born today in Buganda are fathered by Rwandese, if that is not assimilation tell me what is. Every population you see out there develops for it backs each other, there is no Muganda that will ever back another Muganda, they try so hard to appease none Baganda by selling each other to the none Baganda, the woman that was killing the most Baganda in Katabi to appease Acholi and Langi in power, was UPC chairman Nalongo a Muganda. Because Mutesa one wanted to appease none Baganda, he tied his fellow Baganda in Namugongo and decapitated them. Uganda Martyrs were never killed by Acholi or Langi, they were actually killed by their fellow Baganda.

When Museveni came to power, there are Baganda is this city that stood up to help their region, sadly Museveni appointed a one Tomusange to be the Uganda ambassador in Ottawa. Well now that Baganda have a Muganda ambassador they walked into universities in this city and collected a trailer of books to be sent to Makerere University library, and handed it to their fellow Muganda ambassador. That container never arrived into Makerere, but the books were seen on Der Es Salaam streets being sold. Those that have lived long in these forums, remember a name Suleiman Kigundu, he introduced the forums structure among Ugandans in diaspora. But Kigundu was a pure Movementist, that was operating in a very volatile environment, for UPC at a time was still sensible and its membership were on the attack. Kigundu as a moderator stood between the two factions, those going after UPC and those defending it. As these factions kept on attacking each other, the Kiganda disease started to eat Kigundu slowly, and he started to attack his fellow Baganda in his own forum, selling them to the UPC none Baganda members, the last story of Ugandanet was told by our grandparents.

Baganda fail every single organization they find functioning, look locally in the city where you live, all Uganda organizations function well, until when a Muganda becomes a chairman, UNAA was a successful story, it was until when Baganda got their hands on it, then it became the single largest Uganda baby factory in diaspora. Today half the UNAA time is spent in courts of law, than serving the massive numbers of population we own in diaspora. Yoweri Museveni is one of those very good days going to stand up and shut off the shame we have in diaspora called UNAA, or all Baganda have to be fired and a team of none Baganda take over. UPC as a political party was created by Baganda, however wars started to walk through them, and they had no hope of ever leading the country, none Baganda took the party, rebuilt it to nationalism and took it to power even twice. And yes they also had their problems, but the total collapse of UPC as a political party in Uganda, became effective for a Muganda Bossa came to the leadership chores and he blew the party from within. There is a school of thought that had Bossa not been brought in, that party would have licked its wounds, and remain kept on a life support than simply collapsing as it did. Stop to change Uganda leaders, what you need is a new population and a cross breed between Kenyans and Pygmies can do you a trick.

If you are serious about fixing Uganda, stop talking Uganda politics and boldly stand up to call for sperm donations sir.

I don’t think Bobi Wine has the mojo!


Bobi Wine: I will not support the age limit bill; the man has ruled us for many years

BY AKIM ODONGO VIA UAH FORUM

You can take a man from the ghetto but the ghetto will never leave them! We have seen the same phenomena in The US where a ghetto fellow who happened to be very rich and managed to etched his way to the statehouse and now what we have a is a state house full of the ghetto stench. Do we want the same for Uganda?

Bobbi Wine is not the first Musician to send political messages through his song, most musicians in the north have been doing that close to a decade, its only that the words may not be understood across Karuma but all along northerners have been dancing to tunes echoing imbecility, ghettoism and corruption in the leadership in Kampala.

I agree with Abbey Semuwemba that Bobi has appeal and youthfulness is on his side and also that he has ambition but that is about all he can deliver. However, Uganda as nation in a modern world, needs more than that and i don’t think Bobi Wine has the mojo, the capacity to deliver that. Albeit, where we are, anything can do at moment!. Any form of transition at this point in time, is better than no transition at all, especially if it inching towards federalism and so i will accept and support Bobi’s ambition. It has to said that, Bobi’s ascendancy will very much depend on the support from the central. As longer Musevenis bread is still being buttered by the untiring hands in the Central, Bobi Wine should content with the wine in his cellar!

WHY LUO WOMEN ARE DRY DURING SEX


by Abdikarim Hussein

Introducer of topic(Man): Why is it that our Luo Women are relatively drier than their Bantu counterparts? One school of thought argues that they’re not “endowed by nature”, while others attribute this condition to the kinds of foods and drinks that our dear ladies consume.
Lady1: @ Introducer…Did you
do your Research very well..?
being dry is not associated with
foods & drinks..some ladies
have lots of water naturally and
others have little that has to be
drained real well..what i mean
here is…You have to do your
work as a man..by romancing
your woman thoroughly….i
promise you water will start to
flow on its on own……most guys
tend to ignore fore play & yet its
very important for
ladies……Cheers!
Man1: How universal is this
claim that ‘Luo women are dry’?
I want to be that the maxim is
false. What litmus test did the
explorers of ‘dryness’ of Luo
women use to arrive at this
discovery. If it is a resaerch,
what sample of women was
selected and how was the
sample arrived at?? Anyway we
shall se the arguments………..
Lady2: Majority of the taps will
flow if opened the right way.
Maybe this reflects more on the
men docking at the stations of
these women. For me, my tap
can even overflow when tapped
right (lots of foreplay even
when not in the mood or if for
any reason I am already in the
mood) but with no foreplay, as
dry as the desert!
Man 2: Seems Introducer has
found the ultimate answer just
from our dear ladies 1 and 2.
It’s a proven fact that any well
aroused lady or man through
foreplay must wet up. @
Introducer, take your time with
our dear sister, working on her
gently b4 penetration and I
promise to prove your theory
wrong.!
Any more Luos sisters out
there!!!!
Man 3: True i agree. If you pay
peanuts, u get monkeys to work
for u. if u cant get a lady in the
mood, expect sahara desert?
Men have to take time and really
get the ladies to also enjoy. it is
a two way traffic.
Man 4: I totally disagree with
this argument of our beautiful
ladies being dry, I also agree
with other members who
argued that with foreplay u get
wet whether u lyk it or not. Ppl
who complain that our ladies hv
this problem r ppl who shoot
first n ask question later. My
bros first u must ask question
then shoot as much u lyk,
assuring ur self total
submission.
Man 5: Thnx guys 4 your
threads to the topic I posted.
Much as I wouldnt talk up my
prowess between the sheets
(coz no1 can testify to that); it is
a fact that ladies arent equally
blessed along those lines.
Although lack of vaginal
lubrication is mostly highly
attributed to limited excitement
during foreplay, other factors
also come into question, e.g
levels of estrogen, birth control
pills, diet,stress, nature etc.
It is from the last point tht i
based my topic.
Lady 3: Introducer, I am actually
very offended by your
generalizing question. Not even
to say “SOME” luo women but
just “LUO WOMEN” in general! u
make it sound like most of us
are dry all the time. Well, u have
tried more luo women while i
have not even tried one. But let
me speak for myself and
hopefully give you some tips
that might work for your Luo
woman that you ave tried who
apparently seems always dry.
First of all, my Acholi/Luo darling
is called Ocibo, What a
coincident…huh?
let me share with you what
works for me in regards to
getting me wet.
1. A combination of me sucking
Okello and an epikack.
2. Ocibo fingering me
3. Ocibo massaging my clits
4. Ocibo sucking my boobs.
5. A comibination of Ocibo’s
tongue in my mouth and his
finger in my vagina
These small interaction that may
not worth much to a man might
mean life or death for a
woman’s orgasm. Now men,
don’t think any of these would
automatically work at night
when during the day you were
being a jerk and she is probably
so pissed of at you…no it may
not work.
Well Introducer, good luck with
your next luo catch.
Man 6: haahhh u luos that topic
is very sickening .dont u think u
r talking to minors,
as well or is “Achilimit” is about
obscenity?
Man 7: We are made of what
we eat!!!! May be i should ask
the same question from a
different angle! ”WHY ARE LUO
WOMEN VERY PHYSICALLY
STRONGER THAN THE BANTU
WOMEN’
Am sure many of u will agree
that it is because of what they
eat and that the Bantu eat
Matoke and that is why they are
physically weaker.
But they are not totally dry like a
desert! i would rather say they
just have enough
Introducer: lol@ Lady3
Lady 3 : Gwokto, you are very
welcome to Acholimit: The best
page on facebook.
Whatever we discuss here on
Acholimit, I am just glad that it
brought you on our Luo Jets.
now, lets take off together
brother.
Enjoy Acholimit.
Man 8: to condemn all our lovly
ladies as dry is not right. I tend
to believe that alot of factors are
in play.Man 3 summarised it all!
By the way are Kenyan Luos
included? and they are the best
in bed!
Lady 4: so true Lady 3, on the
massaging of th clits, boobs and
all th foreplay.
of course not all luo women are
dry…for me its sumtyms even
just th mental foreplay that gets
me dripping. talking dirty to my
man over th phone (calls/
txts)…or dirty chatting wth him
online…
THAT alone can get me so
aroused that i need a fresh set
of panties. lol
all th same, theres nothing that
beats some slow, gud
foreplay…so that by time he
can’t hold it anymore, am also
ready (& wet enuf) for sum
mindblowing lovemaking ;-))
Intro: And the award goes to
Acholimit….. The most interactive
page on FB
Man 9: Luo women lack fluids
but are strong. Bantu have
basins of fluids but are weak.
Thats Gods perfect plan.
Ok, ladies who are bitter here.
Try out a three some.
Bring a Mukiga lady and
yourself and get a man to hack
u both. You will see who has
more fluids!
THERE U WILL SEE THE FACT OF OF
MR DON.
Don I think u brought out this
topic after experimenting-
right?:)
Man 10: Kamba ladies are said
to be the wildest in bed but in
playing the game, iuo ladies r
the best so far….
Ladies who eat a lot of cabbage
and potatoes tenp to be
unplesantly wet. i mean
overfowing. luo ladies only
come good enourg to lubricate
the shaft and wet the sheets a
little, which i find very nice
Lady 4: now therz a luo man
who appreciates his luo
women! 🙂

Hon.Nabila is being fought because she’s a social person who associates with anyone!


Nabilah Naggayi Sempala

By Isaac Balamu via UAH forum

Hon. Naggayi Nabilah’s problem with Besigye dates back long time ago, these are not new unless you are just hearing these issues, but i have put all these issues on the forum before, the reasons why Nabilah is being fought is her closeness to Nasasira, at one time they wanted even to expel her from the party claiming she was soon going to join NRM and this is the problem Besigye has, how can someone not associate with anyone from NRM yet represents a constituency with NRM members. Why should people be divided on such lines?

For those who know Nabilah she was like that right from school days, she was an outgoing person, she is a social person, and why should she change just because she is in politics. Some of the people she is being accused to associate with she knew them long ago before even Besigye run away from NRM, now does she have to drop her friends just because Besigye says so.

It is like a person who falls out with his galfriend and tells all his friends not to associate with the gal as if it concerns them. NRM is the sitting government, MPs have to associate with minsters who are policy makers to bring services to their people. What is happening to Nabilah is the same what happened to the Kumi woman MP.

Wakiso murders: Know the complexity of dealing with terrorism


By Bryan Nuwagira

Esther-Nalwadda was found in dead and raped in a plantantion in Entebbe


There has been a wave of murders and homicides recently in Entebbe in particular and Wakiso at large. The perpetrators or serial killers have been consistent and systematic. In all the murders which are somehow similar, the motives of the murderers are still a mystery. However, the manner in which they have taken their victims’ lives leaves readable signals and a traceable cause.

In all these, unusual to his style, the FDC cult god is reasonably silent, not because he is shocked, but perhaps because he is silently cheering on his scouts. This would not be surprising bearing in mind that after the elections, the self-made “people’s president” painted a clear writing on the wall. Make UGANDA UNGOVERNABLE. I shall link the message to the messenger later on.

With these gruesome murders still ongoing, the residents need answers, the victims’ justice and the entire country needs reassurance that our security machinery is in charge. These demands are justified and asking the police to account to its client which is the population is not too much.

However, in such situations, when pressure mounts, concentration is compromised and in the quest to find quick answers when concentration is compromised, unauthenticated reports and counter reports, contradictions and falsehoods become the order of the day.

Ultimately when the public sniffs any slight lack of co-ordination, trust and confidence in the police wanes.

In the absence of effective communication between the police and the public, theorists’ analysts and liars take the day.

I have no doubt that the police have the will and the capacity to carry out a quick and professional investigation into these murders to bring the perpetrators to book and restore calm in Entebbe.

The IGP and his team, however, have to understand the complexity of dealing with terrorism. The terrorist is still masked and can hit at any hour, any day and anywhere in the world later on Entebbe. Once this basic fact is appreciated, police will resort to working professionally and effectively without pressure.

World over, the media is obsessed with numbers and Ugandan media in particular with death. Police and security organs should not leave the work of informing the public to the media, it’s the work of PROs in these organisations to update, calm the public and inform all and sundry of the progress of efforts in place.

The public will understand that much as the police is working 24/7, the war on terror and operations in this war are not subject to timetables or fixed dates.

The terrorist is and continues to be innovative, high tech and evolves daily almost mutates like viruses in pathological warfare. There is no antidote to terrorism, yet given the required resources, skills and patience we can ably fight it and keep it in check. The police and its sister security organs have made huge strides in this war and Ugandans and their properties are secure now more than ever.

Needless to say, in a world infested with corruption, a sensational media, uncontrollable social media and unpatriotic power hungry colonels, the police has to be smarter and always on top of their game.

Now linking these events to the doctor of defiance does not need rocket science neither is this theory baseless. Coming to 2011 elections, the entire country was at peace for the first time in many years. ADF had been defeated decisively way back, Joseph Kony and his LRA had been relegated to tourists in CAR and the DRC and the Karimojong cattle rustlers were checkmated too. That is why President Museveni and NRM candidates garnered votes in Northern Uganda which had been an opposition stronghold. The FDC had lost the blue districts in Northern Uganda to its nemesis. With peace and sanity restored and communities back on the road to economic recovery, the opposition web of lies were unsustainable.

Fast forward to 2016 elections, President Museveni’s most powerful piece on board was the security of all Uganda and he didn’t shy away from using this to deliver a humbling mate to the designated loser Col. Besigye. With no more lies to peddle in the north and an eminent defeat in a general election, the prophet of tsunami went to the drawing board and came up with the defiance campaign. The best way to discredit the NRM administration was to dent its security legacy and not wanting to disappoint, the Colonel hit the ground running.

The Kasese insurgency was a brain of the FDC to bring the country to its knees, Winnie Kiiza and her bosses in Najanankumbi cared less about the numbers of the dead and in fact they wanted dead as many as possible including the Musinga. As fate would have it, good prevailed over evil and the NRM leadership had a solution.

With little public support and members of his own party worn out from empty promises, what remains of the hopeless Col. Besigye is to make true of his mission, MAKING UGANDA UNGOVERNABLE. When you look at the victims in Entebbe, you realise that the main aim is to make the murders as horrific as possible, as similar in fashion as possible and as close to one another as possible. Ultimately, this sows seeds of terror in the populace, women are petrified and President Museveni’s ability to protect Ugandans and their properties is brought into disrepute.

I, therefore, strongly believe that Col. Besigye is not just watching. If he is not actively financing and coordinating this anarchy, he is morally supporting his scouts who are doing the dirty work for him.

My appeal to the police is to co-ordinate all your operations, open the communication channels, desist from trying to fix dates and timetable to this problem and keep the populace calm and as sure as night follows day, good shall prevail over evil.

The writer works with consumer protection at the ministry commerce in Doha Qatar

Kenya should just revert back to manual counting at the polling station!


Protests in Kenya follow election hacking claim

By George Okello via UAH

I will never trust computer managed elections in Africa. These systems depend on the integrity of the individuals managing them. I can see in the IT network we use here in the UK for the NHS. We workers are just very tiny operators behind a screen connected to a very huge and complicated cyber and digital jungle- there are only a handful of people who really know how the system works and how to use, manipulate the data it contains and makes available for staff as well as for public consumption. These few key people, located at its strategic nerve centres, can do what they want with it. No one can stop them.

Digitally managed elections work in the developed countries because of two factors:

1. The staff managing elections are generally non-partisan civil servants with undoubted integrity and with no personal interest in massaging the results of the elections. Compare to Africa where money can buy anyone who is located at a key point in the delivery and tallying process.
2. The moral compass in the developed countries, the difference between right and wrong, has very little comparision with what that in Africa where people carry their biases to their jobs and will not hesitate to massage a situation if it benefits his preferred candidate- and will not see anything wrong with it..

You already know for a fact every Elections Commission in Africa is appointed by the government in power, and its primary purpose is to manage the process so that the appointing authority wins. Most Elections commissions act just like an appendage of the regime or the ruling party and do not even pretend to be non-partisan. Just look at the IEBC, even before the elections. The opposition had to take it again and again to the courts, even before the elections, to get it to clean up its system- a process it vehemently resisted.

The IEBC was a partisan agency from start to finish. Its Chairman, Chebukatti was appointed by Jomo Kenyatta just 7 months before the elections with a brief to deliver victory, but to make it uncontroversial and as smooth as as possible, using digital computer generated skullduggery. Unfortunately for him, his running dogs or field officers did not know how to use computers, and were so inept at cheating even a child could detect their scams.

Kenyatta should have hired foreign computer experts from London- the 16-25 year old hackers who are running rings around,and playing havoc with,computer networks and businesses here in the UK, and costing companies millions of pounds to protect themselves.

I think Kenya should just revert back to manual counting at the polling station and submission of the results to the tallying centres by hand. That would deliver a more credible result, although it would take more time. Or else, commission an independent western polling agency to manage the process.

Would Daudi Ochieng, an Acholi, have made an excellent Katikiro of Buganda?


Daudi Ochieng

By Ssekajja via UAH forum

A true Muganda nationalist, should embrace the idea of even a non-Muganda, to be presented as Katikiro of Buganda, as long as they truly subscribe to the notion of defending and promoting the interests of the Kingdom.

Would Daudi Ochieng, an Acholi, have made an excellent Katikiro of Buganda? There’s no doubt in my mind, that this non-Muganda by birth would most probably, indeed, have been a better Katikiro, than the master of cozenage, Mayiga, who is cajoling the sons and daughters of Kintu out of the land of their grandfathers.

“Bano be bamu ku baana ba Sir Edward Gavumenti ya Uganda b’eweerera, okuva ku ddyo: Omumbejja Kagere, Nassolo, Sir Edward, ne Mutebi”
From Musizi, November 1968


Mayiga, himself, once described Daudi Ochieng as a true nationalist, with good leadership qualities, who defended Buganda kingdom interests in Parliament faithfully without any fear. Try and compare that Acholi with our real born Baganda in Parliament today.

Prof.Nsibambi warned me off his daughters but he’s a good man!


Apolo Robin Nsibambi is a Ugandan academic and politician who was Prime Minister of Uganda from 5 April 1999 until 24 May 2011


By George Okello, London, via UAH forum

Professor Apollo Nsibambi, rather bizarrely, was a friend of mine when I was at universityy, mainly because of the intellectual debate taking place at the time, pitting him on one side and professor Mahmood Mamdani on the other, which I followed with close interest. I usually participated in the annual Mawazo Conferences which their faculty organised and every year brought together African intecletuals in debate.

Before I left Uganda, he warned me about showing interest in his daughter, saying he would never allow her to get married to a “marxist”. I wonder why he got into bed with the NRA because at the time I knew him, he was a staunch monarchist, but I understand he is no longer close to Kabaka Mutebi and Mengo. I wish I had stayed long enough to win over his daughter- maybe Mutebi would have appointed me his Katikiro.

He is a very warm and friendly man, even though some may not like his views. A bit pompous but in a nice way. Very bubbly and arguementative! And he likes making jokes about everything under the sun.

I last worked with him shortly after the NRA came to power in 1986 and set up a Commission on Local Government which included Professors Mamdani, Mwaka, and Karugire among others. Our commission was to find out what was wrong with local government and recommend a new philosophy and system. This was before the NRA settled on what is now known as ‘the system’.

I was the youngest member of the commission as well as it’s lawyer, and I must say also its heart and soul, having to keep all these makerere dons in check.

We travelled throughout the country, living in beautiful hotels, gorging on the fat of the land, eating sausages for breakfast and roast lambs for dinner,but working in the day talking to the great and the good. I was supposed to be the secretary of this collective of academics and civil servants so I leave it to you to guess how productive we were!

But anyway, Nsibambi and I got on well, but I got on even better with Karugire because we both liked a drink! Every evening Karugire and myself would disappear into the night out of the reach of the group and discover the watering holes of the towns we camped in and would return in the early hours , mostly leg less!!!

Anyway the jokes about girls came about mainly by way of a public fatherly advice by professor Nsibambi, I think he had seen me slip girls into my room in some of the towns we passed through , one girl I met in Fort Portal had surprised me by coming to Kasese without my knowledge or agreement and almost caused a scene, and the professor was getting concerned that I was leading a reckless life style; so that’s why he probably brought in the joke about his daughter, he always thought Marxists were aliens with weird habits !

Any way I left the Commission midway and left the country altogether soon after. Looking back, I frankly don’t think I would be alive today if I had not left Uganda at that time. Either a bullet or HIV would have seen me off. So in some bizarre way I thank kayibanda for kicking me out of Uganda!!!

As for Nsibambi’s time as PM, I think the only thing he brought to the role is dignity as he carried himself well and was scandal free. He is way ahead of the fat arsed ruhakana rugundu who has been kayibanda’s doormat or rug for neon years and still no one knows what he really does, apart from eating himself silly.

Dr.Rugunda is one of the worst buffoons the NRA has created and I don’t see how president Obote could have been taken in by such a fat crook, with hardly any grey matter in his cranium. I would allow Nsibambi to keep his pension but the fat boy would have to pay back all he has looted as well as eaten all these 31 years of gangland rule!

HUSSEIN KYANJO ON THE CURRENT MOVES BY DR. MUSEVENI TO SOLVE THE LAND EQUATION


HUSSEIN KYANJO


It is now official that Dr.Museveni is embarking on a national radio campaign to explain his position on land matters i hope and pray that he gives his honest opinion. This is the third approach on the same subject in recent times.

He started with the obvious formality of going through cabinet to send an amendment bill to Parliament which move hit a dead end only to be prematurely withdrawn.

The second approach was the Bamugemereire commission which is gathering views from the public while sunctioning drastic actions along the way. After all its findings slightly before giving recomendations the commission will as is now known practice visit the great leader for his input. He will get hold of the entire report, get his legal and business experts to find areas where he will twist Ugandans to get hold of their land a thing he has wanted in vain since the bush war times.

It is alleged that during the war in Luwero Dr Museveni travelled extensively and he saw miles of bush land whose owners he couldnt figure out exactly. The story goes on to say that he promised him self to fix the question of land once he got his way. Now there is no doubt he arrived and it is about time to deal with the problem.

During the course of time new discoveries have been made on land in Bugerere, Busoga, Bunyoro and northern Uganda in general and it all adds up to the same un answered question hence the multi faceted approach.

The third attempt as i said is the radio arrengement. The President will be received by hired crowds as he visits different radio stations and after his presentation again pre organised callers will weigh in to emphasise or just support the big mans position. After he is done with the mock excersise official recordings will be made and combined with the Bamugemereire final report a new bill will be proposed and sent to Parliament and the expected result will be got using the numbers in the house.

Mean while there is a hanging dilema of big chanks of land owned by different people from the fevored class Dr Museveni him self is one of them his puported farmland at Kisozi was once a property of the Ministry of Defence. He has never explained him self on how the same farmland ended up in his private hands.

There are several strong men in the current Rwandan establishment who own square miles of land in Uganda and the explanation to this is not yet available.

Then there are investors who want to make development projects in Uganda but they want sizable land. Aparently some registered owners are in government or some how connected to it. I once came across such investors in Turkey three years ago who were complaining of having delt with one big man in government who promised them land for an industrial park in Luwero. On intorogating them deeper they admitted that they had paid big sums to the person but the promised land was un available to them.

There is another group of new players in this question of land and these are Balalo who have invaded Bunyoro with large hards of cattle. They occupy settle and graze their animals and when the owners make attempts to remove them they are confronted by armed personnel.

Recently there was a PR excersise where
Dr Museveni handed over a heap of land titles to the Katikkiro of Buganda but ever since those returned titles have never been transfered instead what we had was that the land on which state house sits does not belong to the Kingdom.

You have all seen reports of Gen. Akandwanaho giving back land to government in return for a fat pay. And here the fat pay is not important but how he obtained that land in the first place is the explanation every one would like to hear.

The above complicated scenario needs a scintific answer and the President in his characteristic style is trying all ways to reach to what he thinks will be the final position in regularising the questionable owners using the law.

My story is aimed at two groups one the general public to know the hiden intentions of the President so you dont get taken by suprise. Group two is that of Dr Museveni and his sellected beneficiaries. Dont waste your valuable time and resourses to manually fix land by twisting laws because this will not last and after a short while the true status will prevail and your efforts will have ended in vain.

The efforts we make to worn Ugandans and in this case none Ugandans are deliberate so that no one comes up in future to say WE DIDNT KNOW!!

Muslims are to blame for rapes in Sweden—George Okello!


Sweden now has the second highest number of rapes in the world

BY GEORGE OKELLO, LONDON, VIA UAH FORUM

Sweden Seems To Be falling Apart So Quickly and before our very eyes. It is really shocking. It is the soft polices that they have taken on muslim immigration that is bringing Sweden down to its knees. It is shocking that a major European nation cannot protect its children from Muslim rapists. It is unbelievable. No wonder buffoons like Trump will begin to appear again and again. The right wing fascists, and Hitler’s heirs,will emerge again in Europe, if the Swedish approach of neglecting its own citizens continues.

Sweden is the second in the world rape league!!!! Only South Africa beats Sweden in the number of reported rapes!! The USA is far behind Sweden, and the UK, Germany etc are far, far behind Sweden. the only other country with a high reported rape is France, and that is because France has a very big muslim population- almost 3 million.

The problem Sweden has is that its figures are doctored. As you can see in the video, the police are not allowed to say it is Muslims who are committing a majority of the rapes. So the published figures are often meaningless- all you get are statistics without the names, religion or ethnicity of the perpetrators.

Iam sure you have also read of the shocking case in Sweden as well where an Afghan muslim boy raped a Swedish girl in his school. He was tried and convicted of rape, but instead of being sent to prison, the courts decided that he would be put on a course of “rehabiiltation”. The court said it was lenient after taking into account the fact that the boy was a refugee, his parents were killed in Afganistan, he had been tortured and that sending himto prison would not serve a purpose. The boy was then allowed to return to the same school, with a court appointed “counsellor” to help him in his “rehabiiltation”

In the meantime, the Swedish state did absolutely nothing for the girl victim.HEAR ME OUT HERE. THE SWEDISH STATE OFFERED NO COUNSELLING TO THE GIRL. SHE WAS LEFT COMPLETELY ON HER OWN!!!

Sweden rape, Europe rape, a slowly dying culture


Completely outraged, her parents removed their daughter from the school. They said their daughter could not even just set her eyes on the boy. Why a rapist was allowed by Sweden to walk openly in a school, and to mock and laugh at his victim is what you have to explain to me..Sitting here in London, I can not see any justice or logic in what Sweden did to this young girl. It is as if Muslim lives matter more than Swedish lives.

I certainly would not follow the Swedish policy of appeasing rapists and killers. In my book, all rapists must know there is only one end- and that is the DEATH PENALTY.

When the first signs of rigging surfaced in Kenya’s 2017 elections!


Officials from the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) records finger prints of a man as they collect data from the electorate during the launch of the 2017 general elections voter registration exercise within Kibera slums in Kenya’s capital Nairobi, January 16, 2017. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya – RTSVQJV

BY MOSES NEKYON OCEN VIA UAH FORUM

If New York Times could apologize for the rush to judgment about Odinga and the election, why wouldn’t we be wrong to blame the Observers?

ODM and Raila Odinga made a legal mistake in 2013 by concentrating on the ‘Numbers’ instead of the ‘Proces‎s’ of how those numbers were acquired.

This whole ‎snafu arose because the IEBC decided to reinvent the process during the transmission of the results.

There is no mystery to the process because it is well defined and not in dispute. The first collection of the data is collected through form 34A, which is at the polling station. It’s important to note that the results on 34A are final and cannot be altered once signed by the polling agents.

Then it’s where the 34B’s which compiles data from all polling stations in a particular constituency are ‎collected.

The two documents are then transmitted simultaneously to Bomas of Kenya. If you notice, IEBC was announcing results without the 34A’s.Some of the results were being announced while counting was still going on in many of those polling stations‎. So where was IEBC getting its numbers from?????

And then there is the business of Military Intelligence going native‎.Someone needs to go to jail for all this monkey business!

Rejected votes disappearing in “thin air” was extremely relevant.While counting was going on, the IEBC tallying systems publicly showed spoiled votes of over 400k votes. At the end of counting, spoiled votes “miraculously” went down to 80k votes.

The main question is how and why‎????

The Judges question on ‘Stray ballots’ which the IEBC and Jubilee lawyers failed to answer may point out what may have happened.Those votes and ballots were moved to benefit someone and take one guess as to who could that be? Listen to the summation of NASA lead lawyer Otiende Amollo, on Youtube, very carefully and all the details of discrepancies between the 34A and 34B’s are presented by Constituency.

All the things I describe were a result of IEBC being taken to court by activist, Maina Kia(sp?).Maina Kia, is a Kikuyu, and is considered a traitor by his tribe.

IEBC was forced to adopt those procedures I describe by the High Court but as you can see, they tried to change things midway.

My advice to NASA is that they should go to court again and lock down any loose ends‎.I can almost bet unlike the last time, they will find a more compliant IEBC.

By the way,Uhuru Kenyatta is not as nice people make out to be.No one gets to the top by being nice‎.Both UK and WSR are Moi’s orphans.

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