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Month December 2013

ANDREW MWENDA WAS ALREADY ON RWANDA’S PAYROL AT THE TIME OF THE CANDIDA STORY


The truth of the matter is that the ‘Candida Lakony’ photo was a fake; a picture taken in Congo by the RPA and planted in The Monitor at a time when relations between Rwanda and Uganda were at its lowest. Rwanda had journalists in The Monitor on the pay of Dr Emmanuel Ndahiro and Patrick Karegeya. Among then was Andrew Mwenda who has since failed to refute the allegations. Others are still in The Monitor.

The Candida Lakony photo was a fake, proved even by a British expert. It ended up soiling the reputation of The Monitor more. So in that sense, Mr Oguttu was right in rejecting it and but of course Onyango Obbo called the shots there then as I was told, and they prevailed. The Monitor never recovered from that scandal and Wafula Oguttu knows it.

Thanks

Otim Olile
Kumasi

THE MONITOR CANDIDA STORY WAS INTENDED TO SOIL THE GOVT


Dear All,
The Candida story was a fabrication by the ‘Monitor’ to soil the Museveni government and UPDF. By the time the Candida story was published, the ‘Monitor’ was under the joint stewardship of Wafula Oguttu and Onyango Obbo. The paper had already taken a very anti government/Museveni position. This posture continues to this day. It was therefore no surprise that the Monitor published the ‘Candida’ story knowing very well that it was faked.

But even Wafula may be excused about the Candida story because at the time it was published the two (Wafula and Onyango) where not in talking terms having disagreed over of tribalism. Wafula’s authority in the Monitor at the time was being seriuosly challenged by Onyango! The truth of this conflcit was unearthed following the shutdown and raid on the ‘Monitor’ by the government.

One of the police officer’s who searched the Monitor offices, revealed that they landed on angry email exchanges between Wafula and Onyango on a number of issues:

– Onyango was accusing Wafula of sticking onto the position of the managing editor of the paper yet the position was supposed rotate between the two of them after every few years.
– Onyango also accused Wafula of tribalism and sectarianism by filling the Monitor with fellow Samias from journalists to sweepers! He named some of them e.g. Odoobo Bichachi and others I cannot easily recall.
– Wafula on the other hand accused Onyango Obbo together with the late Kevin Aliro Ogen of spearheading what he called a ‘Luo’ conspiracy against him – a Bantu!

So at the time the Candida Lakony story was published Onyango Obbo and his team had successfully relegated Wafula to a mere figurehead who was handly consulted on anything. This also happens to be the time that ‘Monitor’ was controlled tightly from Kigali to the extend Kigali could even order what should form the lead headline for the day!! Sometimes the Monitor would delay to go to press to wait for a story from the Rwanda Intelligence!

I can therefore defend Wafula on the Candida story: he had nothing to do with it. He could not stop it being published because he had no capacity to do so.

The True Candida Lakony Story

Another telling piece of evidence that was found in Onyango Obbo’s drawers by the police was a chit written by Candida from her prison cell in Luzira to Onyango Obbo and the ‘Monitor’. In her chit Candida complained very bitterly of being neglected in prison by Onyango Obbo and the Monitor! She regretted why she had allowed herself to be used to tell lies about the shaving picture even upto to the president. She threatened to tell the truth about the whole episode to the prisdent if Onyango Obbo and Monitor did not give her support while in prison!!!!!!

Shortly afterwards, Candida Lakony died a mysterious death in prison!

Peter Okello Maber.

WHAT IS THE TRUTH ON THE CANDIDA STORY


candida
The Candida photo. For those not familiar with this story it was a photo of UPDF soldiers forcefully shaving the pubic hair of a woman in Gulu barracks.The picture appeared in the Monitor edition of 11th May 1999. ‘I was the MD and Editor in Chief of the Daily Monitor. Charles Onyango-Obbo was the Managing Editor effectively in charge of editorial work and my No 2.Odoobo Bichachi was the only other Samia journalist in Monitor out of over 40.The company was well structured and built on sound business principles. But yes, we sometimes differed in opinion which is normal. The founders of Monitor were all highly opinionated journalists who never easily agreed without debates. But we finally always agreed and moved forward.

Ask State House and CMI why they took Candida file from my office complete with all the investigation material including many fotos taken in Gulu barracks. We used some of those materials to win the Candida case.Candida lost her case because her lawyers the then Honourables Jacob Olanya and Norbert Mao did a lousy job for her.

Yes, out of humanitarian considerations Monitor provided some basic needs items to Candida while she was in Prison. But that was it. We did not know her before we published her foto. She came to us herself after the foto was published. The foto had been brought to us by a UPDF soldier from Gulu barracks.

Rwanda has never controlled Monitor in any way. And Charles never tried to usurp my power or to fight for a position.It was not necessary at all……..The person who posted Hitler’s foto on State House website made a big political statement on the direction our country is taking.’

Wafula Oguttu
MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT AND UAH.

MANDELA’S DEAL WITH WHITES WAS THE BEST FOR BLACK SOUTH AFRICANS


Ms.Onicca Nyembezi Mothoa aged 63 born in 1947 in Atteridgeville to Sophie Majeni has come up claiming to be Madiba's loved child. Family members are disputing her claims

Ms.Onicca Nyembezi Mothoa aged 63 born in 1947 in Atteridgeville to Sophie Majeni has come up claiming to be Madiba’s loved child. Family members are disputing her claims


Unlike DRC’s Patrice Lumumba, Mandela was ready to govern. Mr. Lumumba was not ready to govern. I will send you a book reference by an eye witness whose father served in Lumumba’s regime. When I read Lumumba’s speech I could not believe it. He played into the hands of imperialism to finish him.

BTW, the same dirty mining networks then that killed the UN secretary in Congo and Lumumba are still the very ones doing harm to DRC.

People can criticize Madiba for forgiving the Boers, but it was the smart thing. Tough yes, but in hindsight it was genius.People should also bear the following: path dependence in south where structural inequality was long entrenched and it will not be reverse din 20 years. It will take time and discipline on behalf of the majority to narrow the gap. For example, produce fewer kids, delay age of first marriage, educate kids etc.

In economics, some argue that supply creates its own demands. Now South Africans are better educated so they demand better jobs. With better jobs and opportunities they demand better houses. With better houses they demand electricity and water. Also bear in mind Senator Amartya’s argument about inequality. I believe majority compare themselves to fellow Africans and many see rising inequality within the majority. We are talking about relative inequality.

Did Madiba give the majority opportunities? Absolutely? Did black majority rule improve the lives of our folks? Absolutely. Could more be done? Absolutely? There is a dilemma in South Africa, freedom means more not less choice. I hear that today’s South Africans drink more than Zambians. If true therein lies the problem.

Yes there is an element of self destruction. I will send you two book references latter. But we must think. What are we doing by letting babies have babies? This is the greatest indicator of poverty anywhere. Why are our people adamant to use safe methods of family planning? Why can’t our people too like white folks here have their cake and eat it too? Do you think these white folks are angels? No. But they take care of business in advance.

I bring this up to show you that Africans are busy talking about poverty and it is real. But no one is talking about the real cause. I know why. They do not want to empower our women. Yes that is it. People personal responsibility matters. You know what I mean. Man up or woman up please.

Look at South Sudan now. They are going to kill each other. They had forgiven that trouble maker the former VP who sided with the North, okay Sudan during the struggle. Now he wants to be president. This time he may be finished.

Let me say it again, South Africa is doing much better than the rest of Africa because of Madiba’s wisdom and sense of judgment. He paid attention to the bigger picture which is black majority rule. That was not negotiable. The rest were in the spirit of give and take. After all, Boers too are South Africans. Yes.

It is incumbent upon the majority to embrace positive behavior and try to narrow the gap between the majority and minority. The key word here is negative behavior like that found among inner city African American men in the USA.

Iam sure Madiba improved the quality of schools for the majority. That is the way to go. Narrowing inequality will only come about if the majority acquires the skills to make it in the labour market.

I will let those UAH members in South Africa tell you more. Are their opportunities for the majority? Absolutely. FYI, there is affirmative action in employment and education. But here is the truth- it is the black women who are enjoying the benefits because they had better education and therefore the skills to help them in the labour market. I am sure and again will defer to those in South Africa, women are doing better than men if you control for certain factors. For example, those who delayed child bearing into their 20s and went to school are doing well.

It goes back to the basics as they say “education does not lie”. And that is true especially in South Africa. Why are Africans from elsewhere going there? Because they have the skills in demand.

Now listen, in the USA, at current convergence rates, it will take SIXTY years (emphasis added) for the wage differential between white and black men to disappear. SIXTY! In case you are wondering, black men make between 0.62 and 0.77 for what white men make. It is lower than what women make which stands at about 0.87 to 0.9. It will take several more years for the wage differential between women and men to disappear. Mark you; there are more women than men in North American universities and colleges.

Actually if the trend continues, men and that includes white men will need AFFIRMATIVE action. It is true that today men not women receive preferential treatment for entry into medical school. Yes. The pool of qualified women is much larger than that of men! And let me tell you, the most hardworking university students are white women.

That is an example that “education does not lie”. Now even with more women than men graduating from universities and colleges, they still earn only about 0.87 of every dollar white men make. Yes corner officers are still dominated by white men. But that will change.

Bottom line; do not expect South Africans to achieve wage, employment or labor force participation parity with whites in a mere 19 years. No. BTW, enforcement mechanisms against discrimination in the USA are much tighter but still it will take another SIXTY years to eliminate the wage differential.

What is the situation in South Africa? That is why I laugh at some of you who celebrate the demise of the USA and dream that China will overtake it soon. Wapi. Think path dependence. Yes affirmative action in South Africa is trying to narrow the gap, but our folks should avoid negative behavior. Again why can’t our women have their cake and eat it too? I know they can if they are smart and stop being slaves to religion.

Has the ANC built more schools for the majority? What about technical and middle level colleges? What about apprenticeship programs? I know they have affirmative action in higher education.

The same applies to life expectancy. For the next generation the majority will continue to lag white expectancy. Why? Because of poor social determinants of health (SDH) during Apartheid. The inequality disadvantaged the majority. So those born during Madiba’s reign should have higher life expectancy than their parents assumming SDH factors have improved. And do not forget gender is one of the SDH.

Sure I wish land distribution was more equitable than it is today. But I believe it will change with time.Let others improve of Madiba’s legacy. It would be expecting too much from one man as he himself said, he was no saint.

That said South Africans should care about the means used to distribute land. Okay, I know those Boers grabbed our people’s land, but that was before the new South African constitution. I know plans are underway to reform the land. Yes it is slow, but better get it right.

Have you had the chance to read the South African constitution? If you did you should know that the ANC pushed for civil service reform. For starters there is affirmative action in South Africa and that applies to the public sector too. Again ask those in South Africa whether the majority are not well represented in the civil service. I said yesterday that even with affirmative action one must have the basic skills. That is why South African women in particular are spoilt for choice. Why? In general they had better access to education than men.This too is being reversed through affirmative action in the education system. Please note that it is barely 20 year since Madiba became the first black president.

Now that Malema better be careful with Zuma. Zuma may do to him what he did to Buthelezi. I hope you know that Malema is a crook, corrupt as hell and only tried to cover up his corruption before he was busted.

Anyways how does South Africa rank against older independent African states? Certainly much better on many scores. Why? And before we praise Lumumba, DRC is almost dead last on SDH. Hmm.

Read Kanga’s book on Lumumba.Kanza, Thomas, “The Rise and Fall of Patrice Lumumba. Conflict in the Congo”,

London: G.K. Hall (1979)

Also

De Witte Ludo, “The Assassination of Lumumba”. London: Verso (2001), (translated by Ann Wright and Rene Fenby


WBK

UGANDANS SHOULD FORGET ABOUT TINYEFUNZA’S PAST AND MOVE ON


MEET TINYEFUZA IN 1992(posted by Tony Owana)

MEET TINYEFUZA IN 1992(posted by Tony Owana)


In economics they say ‘sunk costs’ or what has already happened should not influence your decision going forward. What happened happened and should not be used to sway the opinions of Ugandans. We should look at the future. And that includes Tinye’s past. It is done. No one can erase his history. Not even God. In other words, it is sunk. So what is the best decision going forward for Uganda? That is the question we should grapple with.

BTW, the idea of sunk cost also applies to relationships. What happened in the past including the great times and all that should not influence your decision going forward: to stay or divorce. This is important because Ugandans seem to be stuck in the past when dealing with YKM. It is time for Ugandans to divorce him irrespective of what he did in the past. Some say he liberated them. May be. Some say he delivered them sijui from what. May be. But that is sunk and should not influence the decision about the future. We cannot undo his 28 year rule, but we can do something to stop it from getting to 30, etc.

The Tinyefunza speech in London is okay.There is nothing he can do about his past. He should not even try to sanitize it. He should simply say I was in YKM’s prison. It is the same prison that is consuming the IGP, and the saveed Ms. Jennifer Musisi. If she can be so callous, greedy and power-hungry when she is saveed one wonders how she would act if she was not.

As Ugandans learn more about FUF bear in mind the WYSIATI principle=what you see is all there is.Now think about DRC. Why is it still burning? Well it goes back to that former postal worker who became PM. His name was Mr. Patrice Lumumba. He had no clue and his actions especially his speech when Congo became independent sealed his fate. DRC is still burning because of his mistakes. He is an example that Africa does not need hot headed leaders who act before thinking.

Folks, this has been very tough year for Uganda. Our motherland lost Mr. Bernard Onyango (RIP), Mr. Chango Macho (RIP), Mr. Sam K Njuba (RIP). That is a lot.

And who are the news makers? IGP Kayihura and his combo of Tumwebaze and Jennifer Musisi. I know where General Kale Kayihura was in April 1979. I think Ms. Jennifer Musisi may have been in her vacation following her O’level at TGS. But where was Tumwebaze? And why does this matter? Please tell the combo that trees never grow to the sky or what goes up must come down eventually. True. Yes General Kale Kayihura should tell them what happened in April 1979. It may happen to them too.

I must say that I never ever saw Amin’s police forces act the way KK’s police goons act today. The open violence and brutality is quite something. Yes Amin’s people grabbed those they wanted and took them away in their UVS and UVR cars , but KK goons and the y are goons, have no qualms of hitting civilians in public view.

WBK
NEWYORK

DID BUGANDA KINGDOM RENT BASIIMA TO GEN TINYE IN 2006?


In his efforts to marshal support for his version of Uganda’s liberation, Gen David Sejusa has allegedly revealed how his NRM party and NRM government stole Dr. Besigye’s electoral victory in 2006. See below…

“In a video released on Youtube yesterday, Uganda Peoples Defence Forces (UPDF) General David Sejusa has disclosed that Former Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) President Kizza Besigye won the elections of 2006 by 69%.Sejusa who was speaking at a Freedom and Unity Front Uganda meeting said “we had our own electoral commission of intelligence at Basiima House.All results from the electoral commission passed through our electoral commission and it is our own results that we would push to the National Electoral Commission.”

By 2006 elections, the headquarters of UPDF Military Intelligence was at Yusufu Lule (Kittante) rd, near Mulago Hospital.

Basiima House had been headquarters for the Directorate of Military Intelligence (DMI) of the National Resistance Army (NRA) and if I am not mistaken the last director to sit there was Brig. Fred Toolit. It was handed back to its grateful owners – Buganda – who put it to more fruitful use.

By 2000 Basiima was in Buganda hands. Could Buganda have hired it to Gen Tinyefuza for his election-thieving operation against Dr. Besigye who was his bestman at Tinye’s wedding? IMPOSSIBLE!!!!!

In 2006 I think the Chief of Military Intelligence was the late Brig. Noble Mayombo, then a colonel.

It is everyone’s legitimate right to oppose Museveni and the NRM but when lying goes beyond the logical extreme (if there is one) the liar will not survive the sheer ludicrousness.

It may be true that Tinyefuza (not Sejusa) actually managed the theft of Besigye’s victory. But before they take President Museveni to court let them get the venue correctly. Mengo could not have permitted them to do that at Basiima unless Tinye and his troops had temporarily recaptured it for election-thieving!

The only way forward for Sejusa’s vote-theft case is to change the venue away from Basiima House in 2006.

The other lies will then become more acceptable to those who have been struck dumb by the ineptitude of Okello’s so-called spy-master.

If Sejusa relocates the Rigging Office at parliament or ISO or ESO headquarters the debate will continue smoothly. As of now….hmmm! Even Prof Amii Otunnu and Dr Magombe must be bamboozled.

Meanwhile Mulindwa Muwonge of STAR FM says this lends weight to the claim that Sejusa is an exported NRM mole.Several months ago I predicted that Gen Sejusa would go to great lengths in the quest for acceptability by the exiled community. He has to convince them that Sejusa is not Tinyefuza. And this gaffe of ‘Basiima Secret Electoral Commission in 2006’ is just the beginning.

Hearing adjourned.


Tony Owana

UBC BOSS

General Sejusa claims Museveni offered 2millions Ugandans to vote for S.Sudan independence, and that Besigye won the 2006 elections


General Sejusa on John Garang, and rigging elections in Kenya and Uganda:
1. Never too late to do the right thing. “It is never too late to do the right thing. I stand here before you not as a saint, for that is not what my purpose is. My purpose is not to proclaim my sainthood but it is to undo the wrong I could have participated in. my second job is to contextualise for Ugandans to know what the real problem is. For defining the problem correctly, is solving the problem half way. I do not think we understand the nature of the problem and the forces that confront us as Ugandans but also as African people.

“That’s the context within which that lady came. And I agree with her. I understand her. I understand her emotions and she is also right. We must confront those issues, look them straight in the face if Uganda is to heal and move forward. There should be nothing to be ashamed about what that lady was talking about. People in the north died. They did. She is not lying. How many, by who, is a matter of detail. We must confront it. This is it. This is it. But also we must know that the deaths in the north and the suffering under NRM was not the beginning of the problems of Uganda, that there is a historical context to it.”

2. Museveni is a representative of a tragic situation. “To heal is to have a broader view of where we’ve come from, where we are. There is nothing short of that. If we do not accept that, then we are in trouble. I personally, my struggle is larger than Mr Museveni’s. It is bigger because Mr Museveni is merely a representative of a tragic situation, is a representative of an experiment that has gone tragically wrong both in Africa and in our country. Museveni is merely a representative. It cannot be an accident that 50 years on after independence, those who got in in the 1950s like Ghana and Sudan and so on, that the African state is in conflict, that African peoples are the poorest in the world, that per capita it’s [Africa] the lowest in the world, that interest rates [in Africa] are the lowest in the world, violence index is the highest in the world, that balkanisation is the highest in the 54 countries of Africa.’

3. Museveni betrayed the cause. “Many people ask: “So what are you bringing that others have not tried?” We are bringing a new force, a new force with a broader appeal, a new force with a broader ideology of knowing that every African person or every Ugandan is a captive of history. We need to be freed. We need to free everyone. We need to free our people from the perception of lack of opportunity in terms of organising and mobilising deficit. Before we reach anywhere else, we need to realise that the problems of Africa; for instance if you look at Africa today and what Museveni has; you see Museveni has been a betrayal for our cause is bigger than what people think. Because [for] my personal story, when I went to the bush I was only 24 and there were something big going on. Uganda was not all rosy.”

4. Northern experiment. “What people don’t understand is that when serving under a bad system you become the biggest victim. They do not realise that some of us, for instance me; I have lived a life more at risk more than maybe people who have been in exile. I have not been sitting down. I tried to remove this system many times. I have scars on my body, bullets, inflicted by my own side. People don’t understand. This northern experiment you’re talking about, I was the first to resign. I opposed this experiment in 1993 during the CA. I opposed the changing of what we had agreed in the bush of ruling for four years and extending Mr Museveni. In 1996 I went further. I exposed Mr Museveni’s problems and atrocities; you can go [and check], you know what happened in parliament, against the atrocities in the north and the prolonging of the northern war by Mr Museveni. I was the first to bring it up.

5. Museveni told Supreme Court to reverse a decision, and they did. “If all that meant I was guilty, I would not have resigned. I even resigned against Mr Museveni. I said [to Museveni] I will not continue. My life was in danger. I almost died. I went to the Supreme Court and won and in the morning Mr Museveni went to the Supreme Court and told them ‘you must reverse’ and he reversed. So I was held captive against my will. When you’re held captive, you’re captive. You either play by the rules or you become an outlaw. Isn’t that what Mandela said?”

6. Removing term limits. “So my regret is that I should have come out earlier on. I have no doubt about it. But what happened then, since we have a constitution and Mr Museveni can abuse us only for so long. In 2005 he changed the constitution. I was in Kimaka Commandant Staff College and I was representing the army in parliament in 2005. We were picked at night, those of us who were there, to go and vote to remove term limits. And those of us who wanted to reject, like somebody called Bogere were virtually under detention and were told we must remove term limits. There was no discussion. We went in a bus and you don’t do anything. The day I stood up and said ‘no’ you see where I am. This is the cost of trying to say ‘no’.

“So it’s not so easy. You either go all the way and say ‘no’ and fight the regime like I am doing, or you play inside and ultimately you’re soiled and you wear that guilt and become part of the system. This is how bad systems destroy our people. And this is how we must free all our people. My call is that all people must be freed by understanding that they are all captive.”

7. Rigging the 2006 presidential elections. “Kizza Besigye won by the way in 2006 – I can as well give you another testimony (laughter and prolonged clapping). In 2006 Besigye won by maybe 69 per cent. Mr Museveni as an incumbent got something like 50 something. By the time an African incumbent gets 50 something you know he has already lost. So it’s not even in debate. But how was it stolen?(laughter and prolonged clapping).

“We organised another electoral commission of intelligence at Basiima House and all results from the electoral commission would pass through our electoral commission and it is our results that we would push through to the [official] electoral commission. How can you win in that type of situation? Yes. I must say it all now because I am a new man (prolonged laughter and clapping). Yes. We did it. Yes (more laughter and clapping from audience).”

8. Rigging elections in Kenya. “So of course it is a waste of time. It is deceiving our people. And Mr Museveni has no democratic credentials – has never had them. I was with him in the bush. I have been with him all along. I have told you through all my history. I have stood up to these undemocratic tendencies. You hear some of our neighbours are in the ICC (International Criminal Court). Mr Museveni should go to the ICC like [Charles] Taylor (former President of Liberia). You know Taylor went to the ICC because of his role in Sierra Leone. So he (Museveni) participated in that work in Kenya. That’s why the people of Kenya uprooted the rail lines going to Uganda. Parts of Nairobi, Kibera and Kisumu. They knew that Uganda played a part. It shouldn’t be Mr Ruto (Kenya’s deputy president) alone, Mr Museveni should go [to The Hague]. (Someone in the audience asks what about the role Museveni played in the Democratic Republic of Congo) Right now Uganda has to pay US$10 billion to the Congo government for him (Museveni) and his family stealing gold and timber of Congo and diamonds, and shamelessly we shall pay as a government.”

9. Museveni wanted John Garang to rig referendum. “You know with the late Garang (former leader of south Sudan’s government), I can give you this story. They were going for a referendum. This is how he fell off with Mr Museveni. The leadership in south Sudan know. So Mr Museveni tells Mr Garang: “We must win this referendum at any cost.” And then Mr Museveni said: “You know I can give you two million of my Bakiga, they go there and fix things for us. But the idea [for Museveni] was to have a strong hold in south Sudan. Bakiga is a tribe in Uganda (a man in the audience shouts: I am one of them). How can such a person like that be a democrat? How? How can he be? And that was the fallout when it started.”

Source: The London Evening Post, December 16, 2013

TINYEFUNZA’S FAMOUS SPEECH AT THE LAUNCH OF FUF IN LONDON!


It is never too late to do the right thing. I stand here before you not as a saint, for that is not what my purpose is. My purpose is not to proclaim my sainthood but it is to undo the wrong I could have participated in. my second job is to contextualise for Ugandans to know what the real problem is. For defining the problem correctly, is solving the problem half way. I do not think we understand the nature of the problem and the forces that confront us as Ugandans but also as African people.

That’s the context within which that lady came. And I agree with her. I understand her. I understand her emotions and she is also right. We must confront those issues, look them straight in the face if Uganda is to heal and move forward. There should be nothing to be ashamed about what that lady was talking about. People in the north died. They did. She is not lying. How many, by who, is a matter of detail. We must confront it. This is it. This is it. But also we must know that the deaths in the north and the suffering under NRM was not the beginning of the problems of Uganda, that there is a historical context to it.

To heal is to have a broader view of where we’ve come from, where we are. There is nothing short of that. If we do not accept that, then we are in trouble. I personally, my struggle is larger than Mr Museveni’s. It is bigger because Mr Museveni is merely a representative of a tragic situation, is a representative of an experiment that has gone tragically wrong both in Africa and in our country. Museveni is merely a representative. It cannot be an accident that 50 years on after independence, those who got in in the 1950s like Ghana and Sudan and so on, that the African state is in conflict, that African peoples are the poorest in the world, that per capita it’s [Africa] the lowest in the world, that interest rates [in Africa] are the lowest in the world, violence index is the highest in the world, that balkanisation is the highest in the 54 countries of Africa. When you look at Africa, I think the German has something like three point something trillion, United States has about 15 trillion, China has about eight trillion and Africa with almost 1.6 billion has about three trillion, When you come to the economy of Africa, when you look at the biggest economies of Africa, I think South Africa is about 450 (million), Nigeria is about 415 (million), Egypt is about 200 something. They do not add up to the GDP of Texas. These are the strongest economies in the world.

When these people our friends in the West and so on when they praise Museveni’s economic miracle. Yes But in 1986 when we came [into power] our GDP in Uganda was four billion. Now it is 19 billion. 19 billion GDP is smaller than the income generated by Tesco or Microsoft which I think is about 50 billion, Uganda is 19. We don’t produce anything, we don’t sell anything. We are bulinding tarmacked roads but we are stepping on them with bare feet. We don’t transport anything on the road. So there are serious structural problems in Africa. There are serious structural problems with the African state that whichever change we may bring, it will not suffice. We need to broaden our focus on defining the enemy.

I am the only person whom you look at who has two faces of the same coin. That’s what makes me to be proud of myself. That’s what has made the FUF experiment promising because what has got to bring on board? Many people ask: “So what are you bringing that others have not tried?” We are bringing a new force, a new force with a broader appeal, a new force with a broader ideology of knowing that every African person or every Ugandan is a captive of history. We need to be freed. We need to free everyone. We need to free our people from the perception of lack of opportunity in terms of organising and mobilising deficit. Before we reach anywhere else, we need to realise that the problems of Africa; for instance if you look at Africa today and what Museveni has; you see Museveni has been a betrayal for our cause is bigger than what people think. Because [for] my personal story, when I went to the bush I was only 24 and there were something big going on. Uganda was not all rosy.

In 1962 as you remember, Uganda had got independence. Our great grandfathers had come her to London at Lancaster House and they had agreed on a constitution of 1962. They came and overthrew themselves, they were fighting against each other and overthrew themselves in 1966. Then in 1967, the independence constitution was overthrown and another constitution was brought in. That meant turmoil. Then that turmoil resulted in Idi Amin. Idi Amin devastated the country from 1971 to 1979. There had never been – there was some attempt by Ugandans in 1972 to liberate themselves but it didn’t work and we were in disarray. In 1979 if Amin had not attacked Tanzania he would maybe have ruled until his death.

So even the 1970 experiment was external engineering. It was by fault. So ever that one was not a Ugandan experience per se. It lacked the internal dynamics of a people rising up, empowering themselves ideologically, and defining their means which were applicable to their means. They were all lacking. Therefore the experiment we got in 1979 was a still bar. It resulted into more chaos; that chaos which resulted into another war. The war of the NRM.

I have a personal story. The father of my wife was murdered. He was a young barrister fresh from Cambridge University and was murdered at 28 by Idi Amin. But I can’t bear on that because if I do that, then that’s the enemy, the enemy that we must shift the poles. We must start thinking about Uganda in broader terms. We have all fallen short of the glory of God. We must start afresh.

What people don’t understand is that when serving under a bad system you become the biggest victim. They do not realise that some of us, for instance me; I have lived a life more at risk more than maybe people who have been in exile. I have not been sitting down. I tried to remove this system many times. I have scars on my body, bullets, inflicted by my own side. People don’t understand. This northern experiment you’re talking about, I was the first to resign. I opposed this experiment in 1993 during the CA. I opposed the changing of what we had agreed in the bush of ruling for four years and extending Mr Museveni. In 1996 I went further. I exposed Mr Museveni’s problems and atrocities; you can go [and check], you know what happened in parliament, against the atrocities in the north and the prolonging of the northern war by Mr Museveni. I was the first to bring it up.

If all that meant I was guilty, I would not have resigned. I even resigned against Mr Museveni. I said [to Museveni] I will not continue. My life was in danger. I almost died. I went to the Supreme Court and won and in the morning Mr Museveni went to the Supreme Court and told them ‘you must reverse’ and he reversed. So I was held captive against my will. When you’re held captive, you’re captive. You either play by the rules or you become an outlaw. Isn’t that what Mandela said?

So my regret is that I should have come out earlier on. I have no doubt about it. But what happened then, since we have a constitution and Mr Museveni can abuse us only for so long. In 2005 he changed the constitution. I was in Kimaka Commandant Staff College and I was representing the army in parliament in 2005. We were picked at night, those of us who were there, to go and vote to remove term limits. And those of us who wanted to reject, like somebody called Bogere were virtually under detention and were told we must remove term limits. There was no discussion. We went in a bus and you don’t do anything. The day I stood up and said ‘no’ you see where I am. This is the cost of trying to say ‘no’.

So it’s not so easy. You either go all the way and say ‘no’ and fight the regime like I am doing, or you play inside and ultimately you’re soiled and you wear that guilt and become part of the system. This is how bad systems destroy our people. And this is how we must free all our people. My call is that all people must be freed by understanding that they are all captive.

This is how bad governance shrives, by putting people in small groups, with smaller interests, and small organisations. Bad systems rule people in perpetuity. Walter here spoke about something important. He said in Uganda for the last 27 years, maybe what people outside may not understand, every region has opposed Museveni. There was a war in Buganda against Museveni – it was a Buganda war. There was a western war by the people in Kasese – the Kasese war; there was a war in eastern Uganda – the eastern war; there was a war in West Nile – it was a West Nile war; then there was a war in northern Uganda – it is a northern war.

You must reject that. That’s what FUF says. We must have a Ugandan movement to fight dictatorship. That’s what we bring on board. What we bring on board is the galvanisation of our people’s general consciousness – the mass movement of people to get to a critical mass to free themselves. That’s my mission – no less, no more. Where does it start? It starts by me admitting I am wrong and say I am sorry. But I must move forward. I must move forward. I must not be captive of a bad past because the bad past would have won. I will defeat it by defeating the wrongs of the past.

Therefore stand with me, Ladies and Gentleman, and know that you have a serious fighter. I have three scars from Idi Amin. Some of you here were with me at university. I started fighting Idi Amin as a young boy. And I have other scars. I thought I was doing something better for Africa, for Uganda. I was betrayed. We thought when we were in the bush what Mr Museveni had come to promise as a fundamental change – what we had in mind was to fundamentally change the African colonial state, remove the bottlenecks of Africa – these competing armies.

You know the military expenditure in Africa – right now in East Africa, there is an arms race, huge arms race among East African countries. Who’s the enemy? Whom are they arming each other against? Against their own people. All the money instead of going into development it is in an arms race. This is the nature – the tiny states of Africa which are unviable. The lack of integration. We thought that Mr Museveni would actualise our integration of East African states, the markets – to remove the perpetual fear of military attacks across these artificial borders – of creating bigger trading enclaves – of freeing our people. He let us down. Instead, he started building his personal bay? To the extent of bringing in his family, his wife, and his children – some things which are so decadent I don’t know in which century they belong, maybe the 12th? I don’t know and you don’t know. And how in this 21st century can somebody bring his wife to be a minister and then his son to [command the army]? They are so decadent.

So the new thing that FUF has done is uniting our people. The people of the media you should not lose the significance of that. That lady (the one who had earlier interrupted the meeting to protest against what Gen Sejusa did while commanding troops there) was from northern Uganda and the people who were trying to stop her were from northern Uganda, not western Uganda. This is a fundamental shift (clapping). It was people from northern Uganda protecting me and saying we want to move forward. Thank you very much. Thank you.

So what is the way forward? There are many people asking us: “Therefore, are you going into elections or are you going to fight?” The general approach is simple. We have realised what is going on in Uganda and everyone now agrees that we must have change. Our job is to cause this change. There are means that have been provided by the constitution but Mr Museveni has subverted them. He has changed the constitution. He has removed term limits which meant to account for power. If peaceful means therefore, which are within the constitution say, even our friends will have to tell us. We as a people, do we have a right to be free or not? Should we be prisoners or should we free ourselves?

This is the answer. The choice is Mr Museveni’s. To free Uganda or we shall force him to free ourselves. Therefore before I go to stand, we must have the Uganda we want which is capable of organising an election, which is capable of uniting a people and capable of operating outside this kind of fear. You cannot organise an election in these types of conditions. He must stop misusing the military. He must stop buying the elections. He must stop violence. No I don’t think I can participate in Mr Museveni’s elections. Never – because I know how it works.

Kizza Besigye won by the way in 2006 – I can as well give you another testimony (laughter and prolonged clapping). In 2006 Besigye won by maybe 69 per cent. Mr Museveni as an incumbent got something like 50 something. By the time an African incumbent gets 50 something you know he has already lost. So it’s not even in debate. But how was it stolen?(laughter and prolonged clapping).

We organised another electoral commission of intelligence at Basiima House and all results from the electoral commission would pass through our electoral commission and it is our results that we would push through to the [official] electoral commission. How can you win in that type of situation? Yes. I must say it all now because I am a new man (prolonged laughter and clapping). Yes. We did it. Yes (more laughter and clapping from audience).

So of course it is a waste of time. It is deceiving our people. And Mr Museveni has no democratic credentials – has never had them. I was with him in the bush. I have been with him all along. I have told you through all my history. I have stood up to these undemocratic tendencies. You hear some of our neighbours are in the ICC (International Criminal Court). Mr Museveni should go to the ICC like [Charles] Taylor (former President of Liberia). You know Taylor went to the ICC because of his role in Sierra Leone. So he (Museveni) participated in that work in Kenya. That’s why the people of Kenya uprooted the rail lines going to Uganda. Parts of Nairobi, Kibera and Kisumu. They knew that Uganda played a part. It shouldn’t be Mr Ruto (Kenya’s deputy president) alone, Mr Museveni should go [to The Hague]. (Someone in the audience asks what about the role Museveni played in the Democratic Republic of Congo) Right now Uganda has to pay US$10 billion to the Congo government for him (Museveni) and his family stealing gold and timber of Congo and diamonds, and shamelessly we shall pay as a government.

You know with the late Garang (former leader of south Sudan’s government), I can give you this story. They were going for a referendum. This is how he fell off with Mr Museveni. The leadership in south Sudan know. So Mr Museveni tells Mr Garang: “We must win this referendum at any cost.” And then Mr Museveni said: “You know I can give you two million of my Bakiga, they go there and fix things for us. But the idea [for Museveni] was to have a strong hold in south Sudan. Bakiga is a tribe in Uganda (a man in the audience shouts: I am one of them). How can such a person like that be a democrat? How? How can he be? And that was the fallout when it started.

So my answer is we need to look at this whole experience of elections and the world must also understand. But also the world must understand that the geopolitical machinations of Museveni are a fassad. They are a lie. Because Museveni is not Uganda. He is a representative. We are the people who can make change in a sustainable way, the people of Uganda, not an individual. And they should learn from what happened in other countries not to invest in individuals because individuals expire. During the cold war, the people who invested in Mobutu, what happened? You look at the DR, look at the North African countries.

So our involvement in Somalia was because we had genuine interests in Somalia. 1.5 million small guns cross from Somalia into Uganda every other two years. This is a huge thing. So it is in our interests to have a stable Somalia. So no one should tell us that if Mr Museveni is not there, then Somalia will go. No we shall do our job because we too have our interests not Mr Museveni. They are Ugandan interests. There are other issues. The world must know that it can be served better by sustainable engagement of country than individual. Individuals have subvert the movement of history and cause instability. If unstable countries were the best for Western cooperation, why is it then that their volume of trade, their relations are higher with countries which are stable?

Look at Asia, look at everywhere. It means that the African states that are unstable must be replaced in order that there is a genuine sustainable progress in the world. And the West must also know that an unstable Africa is bad for the world. These strong men don’t ensure stability. For example I can tell you that by 2040, the forest cover in Uganda will be finished. What does that mean? It means drought, and the undermining of food security. Some of the lakes in Africa have dried up like Lake Chad and others. Lake Victoria is shrinking. If the water sources are gone and yet Mr Museveni is building hydro-electric dams everyday but is cutting forests. So he does not understand the relationship between the environment and power generation. He doesn’t understand.

So the West will have immigration, it will have wars and unstable areas in which terrorism will be germinating every day. So it is in the interests of the West to invest in sustainable peace and security. They cannot demand anything else because then their interests will not be met. But they must know that they interests will best served in institutions that are well governed.

So those are some of the details I wanted to talk about. The rest is about the FUF. The FUF has brought in a new ideology, a broad-based movement well beyond groups, recruiting even among the NRM. This is a new movement that recognises the innocence of people. We begin with innocence before we project guilt. Therefore even those people who are in the NRM, they need to come and we will accept them.

Don’t be used by selfish politicians such as Gen.Sejusa!


Fellow Ugandans At Heart,

There is no doubt that ‘not all is rosy’ in Uganda and that there is much to be desired. With this in mind, I have also to think very carefully about whatever step I take, or whom I have to follow for the good of our country, Uganda.

The lady who caused a bit of commotion at Gen. Tinyefuza’s speech is said to be from Northern Uganda. The people who calmed the lady down are also believed to be from Northern Uganda and Gen. Tinyefuza is delighted and calls that, “a fundamental shift.” To him, that was an attack by a Northerner from which he was protected by other Northerners!

Gen. Tinyefuza talked about what the people are asking. “So, what is the way forward? Therefore, are you going into elections, or are you going to fight?”

There was no direct answer to the question. However, all the words used to circumnavigate the question indicate that he, Gen. Tinyefuza pointed at the elections.

I watched the video posted here at the UAH and read through the text here below. All this only reminds me of yesteryears when I was led to believe that the situation in Uganda was terrible. The people who told me what was supposedly happening in Uganda were politicians who claimed even to have a large following inside Uganda. I respected them and listened to them like a student listens to a teacher.

By 1989 I had developed a good relation with the UG. authorities through the Ugandan Embassy in Copenhagen, Denmark. My mission was to see Ugandans learning from our past experiences in order to create a harmonious country in which we would have equal opportunities and the ‘Democracy’ that had been denied by lack of national integration and the politicians who only enhanced their personal agendas.

The Uganda Human Rights Activists in Scandinavia, I think it was in conjunction with the Organisation of Ugandans in Sweden, organised a Seminar on Uganda. That was in June, 1989 and the Seminar’s venue was in Stockholm, Sweden. The Uganda government was to be represented by the UG. Ambassador to Scandinavia. At the time, I had travelled to several countries around Europe, meeting some officials of organisations. The purpose of my travels was to find ideas about how a Ugandan organisation could be formed, to unite the people without any link to political parties. Simply, a Ugandan family.

I think that the Ugandan authorities had already known about my mission which had no political agenda whatsoever, but to bring the Ugandan people together as a family. By so doing, I hoped that we could be able to discuss the issues of our country as one people and that together we could always find ways to errect projects that could economically benefit our people and country at large.

I first heard about the Seminar from some Ugandans who had come to Copenhagen for a Weekend. They did not say much about it and I did not inquire much about it because to me, it sounded like a political meeting that I surely did not want to attend.

One day the Ugandan Ambassador to Scandinavia, H.E. Edith G. Sempala telephoned me and also told me about the Seminar to be held in Stockholm, Sweden. She asked if I had been invited. I told her that I had heard about it from some Ugandans, but did not even ask much what the Seminar was about.

Several days later, I received some Ugandan politicians at my residence in Copenhagen. They claimed to have just passed by, but had a lot to say. They talked a lot about the “killings” going on in Uganda and the plans President Museveni had in place to make himself, “Ssabagabe” (King of Kings) of Uganda. By the time they left, I had a different feeling about the situation in Uganda.

Several days later I received another telephone call from the UG. Ambassador. She again asked me whether I was going to the Seminar in Stockholm. I told her that I was not. She requested me to attend the Seminar as a representative of the UG. government. I told her frankly that it was her duty as the UG. Ambassador. I also told her that I had a ‘Refugee’ status and representing the UG. government would contradict my status. I told her to let me think about it.

The next day I received a telephone call from Mr. Lance Sera Muwanga, then Chairman of the Uganda Human Rights Activists in Scandinavia. He warned me against representing the UG. government at the Seminar. I received threat calls and by the time H. E. Ambassador Edith G. Sempala called, I had through fear made up my mind not to represent the UG. government at the Seminar. In stead I was invited personally by Mr. Lance Sera Muwanga, who was also to Chair the Seminar.

At the Seminar Mr. Omwony Ojwok, an official of the UNLF-AD told the Seminar the history of Uganda and wanted the audience to know the genesis of Uganda’s problems.

My shock and disbelief was when I again received some guests at my residence, only to inform me that the UNLF-AD had dissolved and that they had accepted to work with the NRM government to find a solution for Uganda’s problems. Mr. Omwony Ojwok had been appointed Minister of State, Office of the President. Mr. Dani Wadada Nabudere told me that he had decided to retire from politics and that he would be teaching at a certain College in Mbale. Prof. Edward Rugumayo and Mr. Yash Tandon had also decided to quit politics. My shock was because these are some of the people who had warned me against representing the UG. government at the Seminar, but had not only decided to return home, but also to be part of the government.

Mr. Nabudere returned to Denmark for some of his belongings which had remained behind, but also came to visit me. He came with another Ugandan professor, Baalam Kweri. They advised me to form a political party in order to remain “relevant” to the Ugandan political scene. I only noded and had no comment to the suggestion.

The purpose of this revelation is to warn fellow Ugandans not to be used as “stepping stones” for the people who want to climb Uganda’s political ladder. We must not accept any more wars in our country. We should do all we possibly can to encourage dialogue in search for peace and harmony, for that is the foundation for any achievements we need for our country, Uganda. We must not be overwhelmed by our emmotions so as to make unwise decisions.

We must learn from the past the mistakes we should avoid, if we truly need our country to heal. I wish only the best for our country, the Republic of Uganda.

Byaruhanga John Rubin.

Fancy a situation when Museveni would leave behind Kiiza Besigye as Acting President!


A memorial service in a Johannesburg stadium will be held for the anti-apartheid leader on Tuesday, Dec. 10.

A memorial service in a Johannesburg stadium will be held for the anti-apartheid leader on Tuesday, Dec. 10.

mand
As we mourn a genuine revolutionary Nelson Mandela let us reflect on the virtues of magnanimity, bigheartedness, tolerance, unselfishness and justice that he did not only believe in but practiced. As you may recall there is a time when Mandela and his vice were both going out of the country at the same time. What did he do!. He left behind his nemeses and arch rival Mongosuthu Buthelezi of the Inkatha Freedom party as Acting president.

Fancy a situation when Museveni would leave behind Kiiza Besigye as Acting President!. Mandela accepted to work with de Klerk the former president who represented a system that imprisoned and tormented him in prison for 27 years. Fancy a situation where Obote would serve as the vice president of Museveni in the NRM unity government!.

As we reflect on the Mandela departure let the politicians in Uganda learn how to tolerate each other for the sake of national integration and to create an atmosphere for evolving national consensus values.

Regards

Mwambutsya Ndebesa
UAH member
History & Development Studies Department
Makerere University
P.O Box 7062,
Kampala-Uganda

Mob: +256 783 717 101

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Black, Asian, and colored people could only aspire to becoming laborers or tradesmen during apartheid in S.Africa.

Black, Asian, and colored people could only aspire to becoming laborers or tradesmen during apartheid in S.Africa.


In your life time, you will never live in the same era with another Mandela.Nelson Mandela is incapable of duplication; in character or substance. Where he was expected to be bitter and vindictive in retribution, Mandela preached and practised harmony, tolerance and humility.While he had earned the right to be angry at his white tormentors, Madiba ate with them, and even defended them against radical, armed black warriors.

I was a UN Press Officer when Mandela came to the United Nations shortly after his release. As we lined up behind the Chief of Protocol to receive Mandela, tears were running in folks’ cheeks, tears of joy and gratitude.

I had been awed by one other World Leader before then; Mother Teresa in Nairobi in 1987, when she paid a courtesy call on the Mayor and I was assigned to cover the event.

Mother Teresa and Mandela carried with them an aura of utmost reverence and believability. You bow to them out of your own sense of respect, not because they expect you.

Mandela leaves us a legacy and a permanent reference point for every one who aspires to serve the public anywhere in the world. For his service and devotion to a just cause, not only for his fellow South Africans but for the world at large, mankind is forever indebted to him.

Edward Pojim.
UAH member in NewYork

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