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Day August 5, 2017

“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze


“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze

“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze
She’s 48 years now. UPC left power in 1985 when she was 16 years old.

Members,

I am really sorry if our government sabotaged MP Nambooze’s education! Exactly what did UPC do to young Nambooze? At her age, there were thousands of young Ugandans in primary and secondary schools who later proceeded to various higher institutions of learning with strong academic background attained during the time.

It is not enough to blame a regime for all problems unless there were particular issues affecting the individual or community. Can Nambooze explain how she missed her Ph.D or what has prevented her from pursuing her dreams over this 31 year period (1985-2017) the infamous UPC lost power? I see many Ugandans taking advantage of their backgrounds and the mushrooming institutions and online/distance education to graduate with higher qualifications these days, why hasn’t the legislator follow suit?

I hope it not the case of scapegoating around UPC when there are hidden problems elsewhere, or instance upstairs!

Peter Simon

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I CAN’T BELIEVE THIS MURDERER IS DEAD!



BY EDWARD MULINDWA

Rurangaranga should have been thrown to the Dogs and eaten piece by piece already. This man has sat in Uganda all this long and he failed to be arrested let alone charged? And for some very unknown reason, I even thought he was dead long ago, this is a man that simply did not deserve to walk free. The man just did not have that right. Honestly who stands for his victims? Rurangaranga murdered people from a home to a home and he has lived this long without any one charging him for murder? Seriously ? Who else is still out there? And talking about the Muslims he butchered, why didn’t the Supreme council go after him, for at minimum he butchered Moslems officially? It is so appalling for we have dropped way lower than I ever expected, I thought all along that he died with the Topachos, I simply do not know how I lost the ball on this one. The brutality Rurangaranga did in Uganda, is the one that built the thesis of the death of UPC as a political party, he is the single man that murdered more Ugandans publicly than any UPC goon out there, he simply does not deserve a grave on Uganda soil. Rurangaranga actually killed more people than Nalongo that was the chairman in Katabi. By the way is that Nalongo still in Uganda too when we are at it? It is very sad that Chris Rurangaranga’s name has even popped on my screen for it brings such terrible memories on Uganda violence, and I simply cannot be alone on this one. Who else is still out there if Rurangaranga has been walking that free in Uganda !!!!!!!!

Jesus Christ.

Not standing up to the powers that be over the $750 Million will be part of Mutebile’s legacy.



By Moses Nekyon via UAH

What he (Mutebile) forgets is that a person can be fired for only one decision. Not standing up to the powers that be over the $750 Million will be part of his legacy.

If I as a laymen could question the pricing of the 6 jets; which should have not cost more than $350 Million, how about him as Governor?

The Bank of Uganda (BOU)as an institution ‎does not lend money to individuals or companies. It’s relates only to other Banks or Financial institutions.

How is it possible for almost $140 Million being lent to a company (Haba) that exports Hides and Skins?

Someone pulled a fast ‎one us all, because I am yet to find a Hides and Skins company in East Africa or Africa in general that can generate or warrant that kind of money.

———————————–
By George Okello via UAH forum

Is it not brazen corruption or highway robbery going right up to Mr Museveni himself? Why would any central bank lend $140 million to a private company? A central bank is not a commercial or investment bank that can lend money. A central bank is the financial arm of any economy, its role is to mainstain fiscal discilpine, harmonise monetary policy and supervise financial institutions. It can lend money or guarntee borrowings by financial institions like commercial banks etc but it is totally unheard of for any central bank anywhere in the world to lend money to individuals. It is regarded as a very serious act of indiscpline and monetary folly for any bank governor to authorise any such lending. What makes it even very difficult to fathom is that Mr Museveni, in his personal capacity, because the articles of presidency do not allow him to issue illegal or criminal orders to any public official, orders Mr Mutebile to lend Mr Bassabababalba such a huge sum of money. This crook would never have been able to borrow such a huge sum of money from a normal lending institution eg commercial bank or investor. because the money was not lent on usual commerical terms, it had no guarantor or security so it was on the personal guarantee of Mr Museveni that the bank could lend such a huge sum of money. Dont you see this is not just sheer incompetence or naivette but wilful corruption?

Secondly, why would the central bank be directly involved in the purchase of military jets to the tune of $740 million? Why would any central bank governor lend even just one dollar to a private company, even if there is an emergency, or war situation?The purchase of these jets was not budgeted for, so the Ministry off Defence did not have it in its annual spending round. Parliament was not aware of it and was generally kept in the dark, again in breach of the law, both constitutional and criminal. What should have happened is, as soon as Mr Museveni recognised an urgent need for military jerts, he should have instrcuted his Ministry of Defence to put such an urgent remeasure before the Ministry of Finance so that an urgent Supplementary Request would be submitted to parlaiment for approval. As an urgent measure, this should not take long to go through the parliamentary process. The expenditure having been approved by parlaiment, the whole deal would then be passed on to the Government Procurement Directorate ( either the natioanl one in the Ministry of Fianance, or the one in the Defence Ministry) to carry out the tendering exercise and then final purchase of the military jets. All of these would not involve Mr Museveni as President, because I am assuming the Procurement Directorate employs competent and honest people.

As it is, Mr Museveni by-passed all of the above normal procedures for procurement of governmenet materiel and/or services and got directly involved. he decided to ignore all the government offices, preferring to handle such a potentially huge contract almost as if if it was his own private purchase, as if he was buying his underwear or nappies from the super-market. I am aware, the military market is very complex and competitive and is heavily populated by crooks, so a government like the one in Uganda will often need external advice as the people employed for military procurement often do not have the expertise or knowledge of the market. The UK Ministry of Defence advises many governments of its former colonies on defence procurement: Even though they may end up recommending purchase of British products, but atleast they will give a professional assesment of the military value of the proposed purchase as well as its cost, so the potential buyer has an accurate view of the market and the actual cost of the intended purchases. Transpareny International also now advises African governments on major purchases, including purchase of arms. The African Union, in collaboration with the African Development Bank, has set up a specialist Contract Advisory Unit, made up of eminent lawyers and allied professionals to advise African governments on major purchases and international agreements they may want to engage in. So why did Museveni not take advantage of these instititions if not because he wanted to engage in a corrupt deal?

This fact is borne out by the fact that the British Minsitry of Defence said at the time that the 6 jets Museveni bought for $740 million could have been bought from its own Defence Procurement Unit for $450 million. Transparency International said the same 6 jets could have been bought from Ukraine for $180 million if all the middlemen men were cut off. In otherwords, a government that exercised due diligence and acted in the national interests could have saved the Uganda treasury at least $500 million

What a bunch of heartless fellows these KCCAs are


Ms Madina Namutebi whose child was knocked dead in Kampala mourns after she was released by KCCA yesterday. The two-year-old baby was knocked dead by a KCCA vehicle while the mother was under detention after having been arrested for vending on the streets. PHOTO by STEPHEN WANDERA

The reports over the tragic death of a two-year baby at the hands of KCCA law enforcers were quite telling. (See: KCCA vehicle kills two-year old baby at City hall after mother’s arrest. Daily Monitor, Nov. 19th).
http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Grief–chaos-as-family-dumps-body-at-city-hall/-/688334/2528554/-/2km6yqz/-/index.html

It was reported that while arresting a woman for hawking merchandize in the city, the KCCA law enforcers made her abandon her baby! What cruelty? I would expect that our law enforcers take a human face to their work. These people have been arresting these women for long and by now they should know that some of them have babies they come along with. This means therefore that in the process of arresting them, care should be taken to ensure that the babies are not hurt in any way in the process. That should be the civilized way of doing this kind of work.

It is so unfortunate that KCCA has not managed yet to devise alternative means of stopping street vending several years since it took on this task. Arresting people engaging unlawful conduct is right but the manner in which they are arrested should not in any way dehumanize them, like where a woman is forced to abandon her child to no one and even the arresting officers do not see reason or sense in protecting the child. Arresting the mother should not mean denying the child her right to protection from any danger, an obligation KCCA law enforces must fulfill while on duty. What a shame! Ugandans deserve far better than this from these people, after all, they are paid far far handsomely compared to other Ugandan public workers who even toil far more that them.

By the way, it was said that the baby’s body was carried on top of one of KCCA’s trucks that ferry rubbish! Poor baby, crashed like rubbish and delivered to its ancestors burial grounds on a smelly, filthy truck! What a bunch of heartless fellows these KCCAs are.

So, Ugandans can see what comes out of paying some people too much money for doing so little. They end up being so insensitive to other people’s feelings.

May the poor little kid’s soul rest in eternal peace.

Frank Mutagubya via UAH

Guerrilla governments in Africa have failed in social services


By Simon Peter Okurut via UAH forum

I think the guerrilla governments in Africa have failed in social services delivery yet Cuba for example was/is able to serve its people very well.

To prove that observation, at 5;10 a.m.this morning, I listened to a BBC documentary on the state of health services in Ethiopia. The health services in Ethiopia are more sick than the sick Ethiopians, to say the least. The BBC program presenter interviewed medical students about their concerns and 80% of them planned to leave Ethiopia immediately they graduate because of several reasons including poor pay ($300/month), lack of facilities, overcrowding in hospitals and too many students in medical schools about 30 times the original planned number with many sitting on the floors when attending lectures, lack of further studies etc. Practising doctors prefer to work in urban areas because at least they can “moonlight” to supplement the meagre pay. One doctor decried the poor services in the main hospital ( their Mulago) where in one ward, there are only 11 beds for mothers delivering yet they admit over 50 per day so the rest just deliver on the floor and this doctor says that they helplessly watch patients die because of lack of nearly everything. Next the minister of health was interviewed who said that they are trying, that their priority is on primary health care which he said would reduce the number of those seeking treatment; and that the problem is compounded by doctors who leave Ethiopia for greener pastures elsewhere especially in eastern USA where there are more Ethiopian doctors than the total number of doctors in Ethiopia and they receive a salary of not less than $5,000/month. In his view he wanted the US to pay Ethiopia $200,000 per one Ethiopian doctor employed in the US since it costs the US government that amount to train one doctor. I failed to see his logic, at least if he had proposed the US to pay the equivalent that Ethiopia had spent training that one doctor, it would have some good argument. I was surprised to hear Ethiopians decry the poor health services now, and those interviewed calimed that same services were better some time back.. This revelation made me turn on my bed terribly wondering what curse had befallen Africa. I wondered how governments led by visionaries can fail to foresee shortages and plan accordingly in order to avert the crisis.

This is exactly what happened to Uganda when Idi Amin chased non-citizens (Indians), the government proceeded to allocate the well stocked shops to soldiers and those sympathetic to the regime; slowly but surely, the shops became empty and emptier and by 1978, most shop counters/shelves were filled with bananas, banana leaves or kabalagala with many shopkeepers yawning and sleepy early morning.

While we can suggest good ideas that could improve the social services ( medical services) in Uganda, I think the first thing we should do is to get the government directly involved by it spearheading the discussions so that we are sure that the policy makers and implementers are all on board and are ready to move forward. We need to engage various stake holders so that a strategy can be developed, otherwise none of the brilliant suggestions can be implemented or even discussed. I am not suggesting that we leave it all to government, no, what I am saying is that we need government to be a participant in the discussions so that whatever is agreed upon is put into practice; for we cannot achieve much without the government’s participation since it (govt) has more mobilization groups/resources.

Leaders should ensure that institutions are developed, strengthened and allowed to be independent. What you are talking about qualified ministers is the tendency to depend on individuals which has caused failures. Obviously, it was Idi Amin’s mistake to give out property to people who did not own it in the first place and the policy of sending non-citizens was wrongly done/implemented:this should have been in phases while local people were being trained to take over.

It would be a mistake to expect any president to know everything under the sky! And this is exactly the problem we face; our leaders assume that they know everything and when challenged, they get jittery. Politicians’ role is merely to oversee work done by technocrats. There are many ways of monitoring developments in constituencies not necessarily being there physically, though NRM government has found pleasure in dishing out millions of shillings to MPs during elections for “monitoring developments” in their constituencies some of which were abandoned for nearly 5 years!

Hillary-Onek saved the Energy Ministry but other ministers are lazy and useless!


Hillary-Onek

Isaac Balamu via UAH forum

Was it Amin’s fault that those he gave the shops ended up filling them with bananas? That man should be given credit for transforming Uganda .

You see I have said this man times and I get attacked but I think we Ugandans and I could generalise and say Africans in general are a lazy lot. We don’t want to be innovative, we don’t think about tomorrow.

Sometimes I even don’t get mad with Museveni for the failures of his ministers but for keep appointing them, that is the only problem I have with him, though of course he would tell you that he picks from the people sent to him and if we are to get good leaders we should pick well, in a way I agree with on that.

It is not the problem of leader for the failure of those they put in place to act, if you look at health, it is being lead by a qualified doctor. Now,can we ask him what has he done to improve health care in Uganda ?

Doesn’t he know that those companies they have given tenders to produce malaria tablets are producing substandard ones that many people are dying every day of just malaria, and can we blame that on Museveni?

The only minister who tried to do some work in the last cabinet is Onek, the Energy man, in fact he was God sent, if he hadn’t taken over that ministry all these oil issues would not have been uncovered. My brother Migereko was just sleeping when these guys were planning to rob the country dry!

When you talk of roads, I think you are some how unfair to the minister of transport because actually the truck roads are not that bad, it is only the KCC roads which are in a mess and even if you don’t want to agree like most people have clearly refused to accept it, those city roads are not his jurisdiction, in fact around Kampala the roads the ministry looks after are in a decent condition. I know I will get people attacking me on this but unfortunately that is the fact. In fact all roads looked after by UNRA and Works have no potholes, that is a fact, I’m just coming from Uganda recently just two weeks ago and I drove on the network and it was not that bad.

Yes Kampala still has its issues and we pray that the new authority will do something about it , but I think the problem of Kampala more is to do with the large volumes of traffic, in that the loading on the road structure can’t withstand any more load. I think the solution to potholes in Kampala needs a more strategy plan than just a quick fix of filling holes would not work. I understand some people claiming this authority will do nothing, I disgree, when UNRA was formed those in works thought there wouldn’t be a change but actually there was.

But to go back to your point, I think these ministers are the drivers of gov’t policy, they have to formulate those policies which they take to cabinet to be agreed upon. Now unless when we have one minister who can tell us they have made proposals and the president has refused to approval those changes then we can’t blame him. It is true some of our so called visionary leaders are visionless but they have given jobs to those they think have a vision but they have also failed.

Trust me many countries don’t have all their leaders knowing all the solutions to all problems but the people they put in places of responsibility work out these things and convince the leaders that these things are not going to be political suicide for the gov’t. when I look at Cameron and George Osborne here in the UK these guys have no clue about the economics, but they are gambling with it some things work others are not working, but I suspect by two years done the line they would have formed a solution.
The good thing with some of these leaders in these countries, is that when the make a mistake they admit it and actually change cause. In Uganda there are even too dumb to recognise this and the media who would help them out by analysing thing, are also clueless. I think the biggest problem we have in Uganda is this uninformed media, they can’t even sharp a debate. Just look at them here on this forum, they have no clue whatsoever.

We also have a problem of many lazy people hiding behind the president, if you look at men like Kahinda Otafiire, really what has he ever done in gov’t apart from antagonising public servants?

And by the way this disease of laziness has spread to even offices of public delivery. I went in one office, where I spent around four hours, and here I saw five workers sitting in one office chatting. Some on facebook, others on youtube and the rest just talking.

For the time I spent there I didn’t see any of them doing any work at all, and what even surprised me the CEO of the company entered the room and they seemed not even to recognise his presence. This is one of the high profile authorities in Uganda mind you.

Now if that is the mind set, how can we see any progress and improvement? We can blame all we want on the president but if you look at it well I think he is the only person who works for his seat, some of these MPs do a lot of nothing, and because they are NRM, they have been given small constituencies. Some even don’t go back at all but are always elected.

So we should not only focus on the top leadership, we should also demand accountability from some of these ministers, they can’t just draw high salaries and keep doing a lot of nothing and it is the role of the media to put these people to task.

Kampala authorities should copy the London Model of Bus Services!


A bus in central London

By George Okello via UAH forum,

I have a suggestion that would help solve the matata and boda boda menace on Kampala streets. Why can we adopt the London model where all transportation services, apart from taxis, and centrally controlled by the Mayor and provided by the London Transport Authority? If London allowed any bus company to operate on its streets, this would create chaos of unimaginable proportions. As it is all transport companies have to apply for a tendered contract to run bus services on specific routes.All the contractors work under the flag of the London Transport Authority. They have very strict regulations, as to fares, time tables, reliability, conduct etc.

If we had Kampala Transport Authority, it would award contracts to about 5 companies to operate on agreed routes. Like the LTA in London,we would subject these contractors to very strict performance outcomes, relating to over-crowding, time table, health and safety, standard fares etc. No other transport operators would be allowed on
such routes so the contracted companies have the advantage of a reliable income while the passengers have the quid pro quo of a relaible service with controlled fares.

Matatus and boda bodas should be restricted to 15 miles of the perimeter outside Kampala and must not be allowed inside the city perimeter because there would be busese operating services every 5-10
minutes.

Alternate streets should be made one way streets to reduce traffic congestion and speed up bus transportation. Cycle Lanes should be opened alongside these lanes.

A Congestion charge should be imposed on all other private vehicles, so that every private car enterring the 10 mile perimeter of the City would have to pay a charge of $10 between 7AM-7PM. In turn, about 4 huge parking stations would be opened outside of the city to provide parking space for private cars.

Such a policy would ease traffic congestion, reduce the number of cars on the streets, reduce the number of fatalities on the streets, be environmentally friendly and save the city from massive pollution.

But the government would have to be serious with its implementation.

Kampala Politicians and leaders aren’t bothered about our health!


Breast Cancer patient Jessy Acen, 30, is examined by Dr. Victoria Mwebe,

The habit of using polythene bags to cook food (Kampala is a model for Uganda) might be one of the causes for both cancers and neurological diseases, which are becoming rampant in our communities.

For motorised gas fumes – I know for a fact that they kill very quickly and quietly. I did extensive research about the same among mothers living on a heavly motorised street in Europe.

Unlike in Europe/USA cancers appear to be among lower age groups. We need a map of the population affected.

In half a year, I know more than six people who have either died from stroke or gotten paralysed! It is terrible and Ministry of Health and Environment appear not to be concerned. Those perishing in cancers we only hear of high profile who seek money to go to Nairobi or India.

The deaths and disease prevalence, can’t be a coincidence. Of course there might be a mechanism generating those two problems – I suspect high on the list being environmental pollution (VOC) and second excessive use of pesticide/herbicides.

The conditions are very bad given the fact there are dense population in filthy dirty town slums everywhere.

More threatening is what becomes of the people who acquire these diseases and then pass them on to their children as encoded genes?

Prof. Emeritus Calvo of Molecular Biology has told me that the next epidemiological concern in Uganda if not carefull will be genetic diseases – and getting therapy for these diseases might prove cumbersome as parents are now passing on cancers to their siblings as encoded genetic diseases!

I had decided not to write more about the subject. But then I remembered meeting Rwandese students who had come to Uganda, specifically to study Kampala environment. All of them were chemistry graduates as I discovered later.

They collected samples of soil and water and upon laboratory analysis, the discoveries were shocking to them. Indeed one of them went on to write a book. Fascinating so, some of these students, initially doubted their government’s stance on environment but by the time they left Uganda, they had become willing converts and unflinching disciples of Rwandese government urban and environmental policies!

Well for Ugandans it is business as usual, let us sleep on.

Now there is a high level of cadmium and ammonia (ammonia water) in all Kampala spring water. And we are increasingly having chlorinated water due to heavy Lake Victoria pollution! Can you imagine heavily polluted water springs? Reading from the causes, it is apparently clear all Uganda towns are affected in exactly the same way.

Kampala is a double tragedy.Once I suggested that Ministry of Health declares Kampala a poisoned region, unfit for human habitation so that as such funds could be committed for a #special status clean up#. Well my arguments were not politically threatening and as such irrelevant.

The burden as Prof. Emeritus Calvo asserts, is on the future generation genetic defects children and health issues that will emerge then!

Once again the poor picks the bills as usual as the rich head to India and South Africa riding on the poors back.

Bwanika Daniel via UAH forum
(B.Sc. Environmental Sciences – Linköping University Sweden)

This is why Cancer is rampant in Uganda now!


Only 25% of children with cancer complete treatment


Forumist

A childhood friend who has been working with government here, passed away instantly after he was found to have cancer, last friday.
He has not been sick and I talked to him just a week ago but instantly fell ill and died shortly afterwards! This the seventh person I have know closely, in six month who has died either of cancer or a stroke.

Data from Mulago shows that;-

a. Cervical Cancers as other cancers are remarkably increasing (VOC air pollution particulates and other causes)

b. More people are dying and paralysed from neurological diseases – stroke (may be chlorine in water?)

c. Kampala temperatures have risen from the average of 18 – 22 degrees Celsius to between 27 – 30 degrees Celsius today, indexically serious implication for Uganda as a climate, vegetation region.

d. Severe wet and dry seasons, as we recover from February , March dry spell/season that has seen food scarcity pushing food prices up, crops planted during April are being destroyed by unpredictable torrential rains similarly causing food scarcity pushing food prices up.

e. Severe coughs flu and burning throats, asthmatic diseases among children – result of sulphur dioxide in Kampala City air

Solution:

The Blue green Algae in Lake Victoria, first and foremost survive and depend basically on two nutrients; Sulphur and Nitrogen compounds. The question is where do these two compounds come from?

a. There is atmospheric sulphur but not in sufficient amounts which can pollute the lake

b. There is sulphur and nitrogen in food we eat, like beans and maize – the concentration are high to pollute the lake if let us say latrine content are released into the lake.

c. There are very high concentrations of sulphur in gasoline like petrol and diesel. Motor vehicles burning make it even more concentrated and very unstable resulting into complex compounds. In fact, if one is quite observant sulphur and nitrogen concentration in the city are so high to such an extent that if one is new to Kampala, s/he will chock on this sulphur gas.

The only way therefore, to save Lake Victoria is through, eliminating the sources, high level of motorized concentration into the city. The city which is hills and valleys allow gases to hang over Lake Victoria in both dry and wet seasons.

It will be near miracle to rescue Lake Victoria. Every single day that passes the Lake is continuously polluted since government action is very slow. There is need for pragmatism.

Daniel Bwanika via UAH forum

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