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Day August 10, 2017

Could the re-introduction of Swahilli as second official language be part of political-placating in E.A. Community…??


BY HANNAH OGWAPITI VIA UAH

I understand that in 1995 they abolished Swahili as the second official language, though a decade later it was re-introduced. Still, I did not find widespread use of it even in 2017.Could the re-introduction as second official language be part of political-placating in E.A. Community…?? You never know..!!

It is unfortunate that Swahili was associated with the military which for long had been an institution of oppression.When soldiers came to loot,rape,kill they spoke swahili,thus it has been hard to convince people especially in the central/south region to speak swahili.

Furthermore luganda being the language widely spoken in kampala,you can be understoood in many parts of uganda when you speak it,since it is widely used in commerce and in Kigali(Rwanda) you can hear luganda spoken.Personally i would advocate for swahili because of its wide coverage,you can hear swahili in kenya,tanzania,comoros,mozambique,rwanda,burundi,congo,mozambique and i hear even namibia!!!!not for getting sudan,somalia.

The language itself developed from the intermarriage of the dialect of these dwellers with Arabic. For historical reasons the language then spread further along the coast as well as in the interior, where it became lingua franca in one version or another.

But it remained a foreign language to most of the population in all places except the coastal origin. During the politicisation of the language issue during the mid-sixties, to a proposal for making Swahili as the sole national language of Uganda, Obote is reported to have asked: “Why Swahili? Why not Gujarati? Both are non-indigenous”.

With a number of their own local languages, Ugandans did not seem to want to put Swahili on a pedestal, especially if it was at the cost of abandoning English as the language of official communication. In academics, there were many with a view similar to the reason for Obote’s rejection of the proposal for making Swahili as the national language.Only political sloganeers loved to promote Swahili on to a pedestal.

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MUSEVENI SPEAKS POOR ENGLISH AND ITS EMBARRASSING!


By George Okello Via UAH

I think a leader should be able express him/herself in their chosen language of fluency in an impeccable manner. They do not have to use English, because there are now translators who can do voice-overs. I don’t think Uganda can go on with semi literate leaders like Idi Amin, Tito Okello and Yoweri Museveni, whose mangled attempts at speaking English are just so embarrassing to our younger generation. Of Uganda’s leaders, only Milton Obote could speak perfect English. Therefore, why would Idi Amin not speak in Swahili, Tito Okello not speak in Luo and Museveni not speak in Kinyarwanda and then make use of voice-overs, interpreters and translators?

Vladimir Putin, the President of Russia, speaks good English and German, but when he is addressing international audiences, he speaks in Russian and his speech is translated because he does not want to be misunderstood. So does the new French President Francois Hollande who speaks both English and German but makes all his public speeches in French, which is his native language.

So why can’t Museveni speak in Kinyarwanda and make use of interpreters and translators and voice-overs, instead of embarrassing Ugandans with his very poor grasp of the English language?

ITS TIME TO SUPPORT A MUGANDA PRESIDENT!


Sam Kutesa (L) and Yoweri Museveni at a function in the 1990s.

By Haji Moses Ali Sebunya via UAH

‘As a natural principle, people tend to gravitate towards those that are like them, in Uganda it is only the Baganda that violet that principle, we supported Obote, Amin and Museveni, all of them, in my opinion are Uganda’s mistake. The time is now to find a Muganda who could care less about tribal foolishness and lead the country, until that happen no peace will ring in that country. All the tribes tested have shown us that they canot lead beyond their home villages. Remember Saban Opoloto was an Iteso Daudi Ocheng, Tiberio Okenyi and Semei Nyanzi were Acholi not forgeting Mao in a Buganda strong hold party. The point I am trying to make is that those names were so close to the Buganda politics not forgetting the traitor who is an in-law of the Ngeye clan Baganda that i belong to. Buganda is less tribalistic than any tribe in Uganda, and for that reason they are the ones that hold the key to peace in Uganda. If all Ugandans want peace agitate for a muganda to lead that country this time around we will not regret.The Baganda that exhibit their anger do it rightfully so. I was in Uganda during the panda gali time I am victim of that time as innocent as i was. If the Baganda want to be left so be it, because being nice to you all has yielded nothing but use, abuse and pain in Buganda. ‘

moseskali@yahoo.com

I stood for Guild Elections in 1980 but stood down for Werikhe—-UAH’s George Okello


Uganda Peoples Congress’ Milton Obote is sworn in as president after the disputed 1980 general election

About Makerere politics and the so-called interference by the UPC government. I was heavily involved in it between 1979-1981. I was elected, not appointed, as Chairman of Livingstone Hall. The person who stood against me was one Mwene Kahima, a Munyankole who up to today is my very close friend. I got elected on the basis of the Baganda vote because they were the majority of the students in the hall. I had the total support of the students from the north and east, and Kahima had support from the students from the west, so the Baganda were going to determine the outcome of the election and they decided to vote for me.

Of all of the Chairmen who were elected that night, 5 were from my law class, and apart from Werikhe Watuwa in Mitchell Hall, Christine Lakidi, none of the other chairmen were supporters of the UPC. We were the only three that were elected. DP got elected in one hall(can’t remember its name), the NRA got elected in Nkrumah Hall and the others were not supporters of the UPC. So how come you say UPC interfered in student politics?

In the Guild elections of that year (1980) for the Presidency, there were three candidates from the UPC, ie Werikhe Watuwa, Yoga Adhola and myself, and then Herbert Wamala standing for the DP. The NRA never put up up a candidate. After much discussion in the UPC, Yoga Adhola withdrew and I also withdrew because if we had three candidates standing for the UPC, Herbert Wamala would win. The UPC put so much pressure on me to stand down because President Obote was campaigning to be President of Uganda and they said it would not look good for two Lango people to campaign for symbolically powerful positions in Uganda.

The same night I withdrew from the race, an NRA delegation came to my room and told me to stand as an independent candidate, and that they would get the western vote for me, but that would have meant splitting the alliance I had created in Livingstone. Besides, I thought what they were engaged in was spoiling tactics.
I was the one who negotiated the deal for Mugisha Muntu to stand as Vice-President alongside Werikhe Watuwa in the Guild elections, because Wamala had the solid backing of the Baganda students and I had to deliver the northern and eastern students to secure their victory. Talk to all these people before you make your wild statements Abbey.
You better talk to people like Mugisha Muntu and Henry Tumukunde about this.

The politics at Makerere University Guild presidential elections was fought on purely party basis. I was myself a candidate, standing for the UPC. Herbert Wamala was standing for the DP. The elections in Livingstone Hall were not held on a party political basis, it think it was more personal because we were living together and the students could see who interacted better with fellow students and who would best stand for their interests. This was not the case in the Guild presidential elections. Herbert Wamala is my friend up to today, we were together at King’s College Budo, and I stood against him in the elections for head prefect of the school but I lost. In fact I owe him some money, one day in Kampala, I had no money at all on me and I bumped into him and he lent me maybe 200 shillings which I have never repaid. That is how close we were as friends. I like the Baganda, but particularly the Baganda peasants. They are going to be engine for social change in Uganda.

In my time at Makerere as a leader for three years, there was no political interference and the elections were democratic, free and fair. There was no student killed or murdered in my hall, where they still remember me to this day as their best chairman for all time.We were the people so active in student politics at the time, with Ateenyi Ndamuranyi at Northcote and remember all of my brothers and sisters happened to hold positions, with Augustine Omara a minister in Nkrumah Hall, Helen a minister in Mary Stuart and Christopher a minister in Lumumba Hall.
When I moved to the Philippines I was the same, unfortunately I learnt a very hard lesson when my wife was abducted and then disappeared. I think we took left-wing politics as a joke at the time, but I have changed now completely.Infantile proclivities will never work. It will only lead to the murder of innocent people and will never serve the long term interests of the people we are committed to serve and to liberate.

George Okello-Pacu-Otto via UAH forum

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