Category KINGDOMS

A Buganda Queen that bore two sons that ruled Zanzibar and Buganda


Did you know that Khalid Bin Barghash, the 6th Sultan of Zanzibar, was a young brother of Kabaka Mutesa I, of Buganda? Yes, it is true. The two shared the same mother!

Her name was Namasole Nakazzi Muganzirwazza. It is said that Nakazzi was the dearest of Suuna’s over 150 wives. But on an unfortunate day when the Arabs had visited the palace at Wamala (modern day Nansana), she was heard commenting about their handsomeness. Culturally, a King’s wife was not allowed to admire any man. She was thus meant to die. However, because she was a dear one to the King, she was pardoned and offered to the Arab traders to take back to Zanzibar. On arrival, the traders handed her over to Sultan Sayid Barghash Bin Said Al-Busaid as a “bride” from the King of Buganda. Of course, he accepted the gift. The point is she married two different powerful kings; wasn’t she lucky?

Later in 1874, she gave the Sultan a handsome son, Khalid who was later to become sultan in 1896. But he ruled for only 12 hours, allegedly because he was not the choice of the British. But while he didn’t get a chance, his brother, Mutesa I made a remarkable contribution to the development of Buganda and made initiatives that transformed the whole of Uganda.

Khalid’s father is believed to be the greatest Sultan of Zanzibar. For instance, he developed piped water systems, and the pipes he installed are still being used today. He constructed public baths, a police force, roads, parks, hospitals and large administrative buildings such as the (Bait el-Ajaib) House of Wonders. This house of wonders is still there to date and was the tallest building in East Africa from 1883 when he completed it. This building had an elevator, and it was the second to have such in Africa. It was the first building to have tap water and electricity. He constructed a railway track from 1875s and this train traversed from Stone Town to other parts of Zanzibar. He introduced plantation of differences spices, sugar canes, and further developed cloves (introduced by his father), and various fruits. He is regarded by many as the most intelligent sultan – he designed the plan of Stone City, which is a tourism heritage site today.

The young sultan (Khalid), believed to be a favourite among the people, was not given chance to rule his people. The British feared that he was going to continue with the legacy of his father, and thus opted for someone else. Upon his capture, he was exiled to Seychelles, the same place where his nephew Kabaka Mwanga was later exiled in 1899.

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Uniformed armed forces should be kept away from the presence and protection of All Cultural leaders of Uganda.


2014:Uncomfortable: UPDF soldiers trying to keep guard of the Kabaka

By Joseph Kamugisha via UAH forum

Not only does the presence of the army deprive the Cultural leaders of their Cultural status but the mere fact that the representation of the Institution of the Army represents a political atmosphere and a reflection of the 1966 Lubiri crisis.

The idea of keeping the army away from Cultural leaders is not to suggest that the leaders should have lesser trained guards. Far from it. The idea though, is to exemplify how other Royal Institutions are protected. Much as Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip, Charles and the rest of the family members in the British Royal family all have military training, they rely on un uniformed but highly trained and skilled officers in all aspects of “[VIP] Protocol Protection Services” The same protection agents could be recruits from the Marines, Ex-Police officers, ex-Military officers, current spy agents or Terrorist Tactical Agents. It does not matter, where they are recruited from but the key issue is that they should always be dressed in civilian arround the Kabaka and other Cultural leaders in order to separate the political from cultural institutions.

A uniformed army advance protection unit could be summoned to a particular location where the cultural leader[s] are expected, but again that should only be for guarding the location, site, buildings, but not any where close to the Cultural leaders.

The Baganda Destroys Kabaka’s Lake in Ndeeba!


BY DAN BWANIKA VIA UAH FORUM
Once, the wetland filtering storm water from Mengo, Rubaga and the surrounding areas to Kabaka’s lake in Ndeeba is gone- then the lake itself will be no more. It is already heavily sedimented with silt and urban waste and polluted with all types of affluent including faecal matter. Writing about what is happening at this treasure has not clicked to make Mengo think or Buganda Land Board to act despite singing about Buganda monumental treasures!

The wetland is now reduced almost to a mere 1/6 of its original size, after being fenced off by Kayanja’s Miracle centre church In November 2013. This come on the heels of similar huge chunk being fenced, in front of the church itself which floods whenever it rains.

Streams feed the Kabaka’s lake under Kayanja’s Church, the subterranean river systems have also been covered with soil.The rest of the wetland was recently fenced off and Kayanjas’ Miracle Church poured murmur into it. This soil is ending up into the lake through the water drainage channels that had been ignorantly dug into the wetland to drain it. This a futile attempt since the wetland has subterranean river systems. St. Lawrence University too has fenced of a huge chuck that has springs under it.

Just yesterday men were busy fencing off the land adjacent to the police station – and it is this piece of land that will finally spell doom to the lake. The only solution to rescue the lake is to reclaim the entire wetland right from Rubaga Road to Rubaga church and close off the road along the lake from the palace.

Mayiga has done well as Buganda’s Premier!


BY W.B.KYIJOMANYI VIA UAH

Folks:

The rule of thumb is when you see individuals win some position attacked by extreme right and left wingers means the individual is actually performing great. Right or left winger only praise individuals who do nothing.

The fact that the current prime Minister Owek Peter Mayiga is being attacked by neo-conservatives and left wingers is an indication of the great things he has accomplished under his watch within the constraints of the circumstances. Owek Katikkiro Peter Mayiga is not deluded by some utopian thinking to sit around and wait for the ideal environment before he can do something for his subjects.

He took the bull by the horn and the results are there for all with the balance to see and appreciate.

The “Ettoffaali” has been great success. And so is the completion of “Masengere,” . BTW, those making most noise and dismissing his success are the “mukono gamu” who have not given even a penny. Go yes the cheap. Go figure.

Owek Katikiro was given lemons and he has made very good lemonade out of it. Now his critics keep on shifting gear mbu he should be given powers. Who should give him the powers? Funny those talking like that are died hard NRM.

Everything Owek Katikiro has done such as his successful ‘Ettoffaali ” is in line with Buganda ‘s values of “bulungi bwansi”. But ugandans prefer to praise bure types who are talking shops. Look at KCCA and collapsing bridges in the city. What has the city with more money done for the people of Kampala?

Owek Katikiro should continue making lemonade from the lemons he has been handed. And why should Owek be the one to fight for democracy in Uganda? What about the bumbling opposition? They are paid is it 30 million shillings a month to talk about democracy so what have they done?

Owek Kakitiro should now move on issues such as health and preach common sense to save lives. We keep saying the health care suffers from poor funding. Yes. But many of the diseases killing Ugandans call for common sense to prevent. Trouble is no one is talking about preventive measures. Take cholera. Why should people of all places Kampala city died from cholera?

politics is about compromise. In the USA with divided government, a president and congress from different parties must compromise to advance their programs. Sure no side gets everything, but if they compromise they get something done.

In my training the most important concept is the margin. We are trained to focus on marginal not total changes. So from my angle Owek Katikiro Mayiga has done very well. If you look at the changes at the margin, his achievements are huge.

Of course, I know his critics lacking appreciation of the value of the margin look at total changes. Wrong. I bet The Conservatives won the UK elections because they changed some people’s lives at the margin. It was those marginal changes-not total changes-that convinced them to vote for the incumbent PM. Likewise the position win if they reassure voters that their policies will impact their marginal lives.

Owek Katikiro Mayiga is a trained lawyer and is acting as a prudent man on behalf of his subjects. The key word here is prudent. Prudent actors do not sit there waiting for Godot. No. They weigh the impact of their choices or decisions on the margins. Of course not all people are happy but those who value the margin are happy. in Buganda the margin is expressed in the saying that take the little even as you keep arguing. Because of that insight Owek Katikiro has delivered through “Ettoffaali” where Ugandans from all walks have contributed what they can afford.

Well there is another insightful saying which goes that “kamu kamu gwe muganda/one by one makes a bundle. That is what his marginal approach to issues and problems has been able to do.

Now on land, I have concerns about the role of the Buganda Land Board in the destruction of Nabagereka Primary School Kisenyi. But other than, the Katikiro cannot tell his subjects what to do with their land. He may and should educate them about the value of land. For example that instead of selling they should lease.

I am a victim of the Land act. I have hundreds of acres of land through inheritance and I have the land title with me here but chunks of that land is settled on by bibanja holders and so called tenants many of whom cannot buy me out. I have offered them to buy me out in return for land title. They refused so no land title for them.The Land Act made the situation worse. Actually there are no winners except senior UPDF officers who are bale to evict tenants by force. I hope you are aware that most land grabbing and evictions in Buganda and Bunyoro are by serving senior UPDF officers. Remember on paper YKM says no landlord should evict sitting tenants. That only applies to civilians lacking NRM connections. The reality is that every day senior UPDF officers are evicting people and guess what, they are protected by police officers!.

The people who enacted the land act were stupid. Very stupid actually because they created the myth that you can have two or even three parties each claiming 100 percent ownership of the same land. You have a situation where land title holders claim 100% ownership of the land, the same land is claimed by bibanja holders and tenants each claiming to own 100%. That is why there are no winners but losers save for UPDF officers. Policies are supposed to improve not worsen the situation but the land act did just that> make the land regime in Uganda worse.

the land Act illustrates failure to appreciate the concept of the margin. Many bibanja holders and so called tenants wanted security of tenure. This could have been achieve through reforms targeting the margins. Yes it is possible to enact win-win laws. As of now the land Act ushered in chaos. As a result, the land Act especially in Buganda is responsible for food insecurity in the region. Why? Too much uncertainty.

I spend months crafting measures that could be considered to address and reverse the chaos. I sent them to the land Reform commission and received acknowledgment but so far no changes have been implemented.

Mayiga will be remembered for kissing M7’s ass!


Buganda Kingdom premier Charles Peter Mayiga during an Interview with Daily Monitor in Kampala in 2015

By Ssekajja via UAH forum

Folks,

Depending on the lenses, each of us employs, to critically look at Charles Peter Mayiga, the Katikiro of Buganda, most of us will come up with either, good, bad, and all the in between.

The only important and most indisputable fact of Mayiga’s tenure will be his capitulation to the bullying tactics of the dictatorship, leaving the people of Buganda and all Ugandans at the mercy of Museveni. He will be remember as “the Katikiro who rolled over” and also “the Etofaali Katikiro”.

The interest of Baganda, and Ugandans, today, is not the restoring the Kasubi Tombs, or the finishing of Masengere, but establishing viable political conditions, that will endure and move the country forward, away from bad and corrupt leaders.

It would not be unfair to suggest Katikiro Mayiga, too, has fallen foul of the anti-bad government challenging stance, the line he towed before becoming Katikiro. He is benefiting himself personally, by softening his hard-line approach against a regime that has been in power for 30 years. He seems to have welcomed a life of luxury, military escorts, and give-way front running light flashing, noise making, police filled vehicles.

The guy who “crossed Lwera”, is laying in a Museveni handmade hammock, snoozing and being sung lullabies. He is now sitting pretty, running and enlarging his business interests. He is not bothered anymore by the decadence caused by the central government, as long as all is well around him.

The “Ensonga Ssemasonga” (the most important issue of all issues) is the return of federal sovereignty to Buganda, and extending it that to all regions of the country. The language should therefore be “return power to the regions as enshrined in the 1962 constitution”.

The only great Katikiro of Buganda will be one who forces the hand of the dictator into a twist, not one who creates buildings. Buildings can be destroyed, good governance will endure for ever!!!

When the Kstikiro uses statements to the effect of – ‘politics should end at gates of Mengo’, one can only draw one conclusion, – he has buckled under the influence of Museveni. What happened to that staunch monarchist who always accused the central government of stabbing Buganda in the back.

Well, If we are to redeem Buganda, and Uganda at large, from the clutches of tyranny, politics should be a daily diet of Mengo’s menu.

Should MPs of a party hindering progress on federalism, be allowed at Mengo? The answer is a ‘NO’!!! The logic here is support for Museveni / NRM, is support against the interest of Buganda.
Mayiga can influence how the Baganda MPs behave in relation to issues that affect Buganda.

We,from Buganda, will have to be steady fast, willing to speak firmly, and need be confrontational, if we are to redeem our natural birth right – freedom.

Mutesa, Prince Mutebi survive angry elephants


Mutesa, Prince Mutebi survive angry elephants

“The Mengo set” was how we came to be known, frequently in a derogatory way: meaning the people who were recognised as the Kabaka’s personal friends, and who some considered were a bad influence on him.

This was unjust to the majority of us because we were not in a position to influence him one way or the other, even if we had wanted to, but there were a few ready to dabble in politics, and even to my simple mind, it was obvious that they were ruled by wishful thinking as opposed to the realities of modern politics on a national scale.

Seeing the Kabaka’s return from exile as a major victory over the mighty British government, these folks, mostly young men of the Kabaka’s generation, expected to go on winning until the kingdom was an independent state.

They were wilfully blind to what was happening outside the Lubiri. They dismissed as fanciful the significant body of Baganda professionals engaged in politics which aimed at independence for a united Uganda.

The Kabaka listened to his cronies instead of taking advantage of the widespread support from the rest of Uganda gained at the time of his exile.

Rather than foster good public relations with the other kingdoms and districts, he was lulled into the belief that a document known as the 1900 Agreement, contracted between one of his forefathers and the British Government, safeguarded Buganda’s right to remain a sovereign state. Later events proved him very wrong.

In some ways, it was easy to understand this complacency, which only really deserted him at the eleventh hour.

The court was still run on lines which were not much altered from what they had been when the first Europeans arrived in Uganda, as the kingdom was called before giving its name to encompass the surrounding regions.

Indeed, it still applied solely to the kingdom as recently as the early part of the reign of Mutesa’s father, Daudi Chwa II, for a framed scroll from the Church Missionary Society, on a wall of the reception room in the Old Twekobe, hailed him as the first Christian king of Uganda.

The princesses always sat to the right of the Kabaka, with Princess Mpologoma seated nearest to him. They were also addressed as “Ssebo”, meaning sir as opposed to madam, a form of address common to all men whether water-carrier or king.

Wives, that is, women who had borne the Kabaka’s children, and there were quite a few of them, came next, with special deference given to a woman who while she had not produced either a prince or princess, and was now married with a young family of her own, had been the virgin who custom decreed was made available to the Kabaka at some stage after he reached puberty, probably immediately before his marriage, to confirm his manhood.
Just as anything or anybody on Kabaka Anj’agala (the Kabaka loves/wants me), the tree lined avenue sweeping between the Lubiri and the New Bulange, traditionally became the Kabaka’s property, should he care to claim it, every woman in the palace was deemed to belong to him while she was there. I can’t say that I ever saw him take advantage of this ancient right.

The princes were more informal as to where they placed themselves, and generally sat among any visitors who happened to be there.

Everybody except the Kabaka, sat sideways on the floor, and knelt whenever he entered or left the room, as well as when one was addressed by him.

Eliva Kiggundu, who was then Secretary to the Kabaka’s Council of Ministers, and Ernest Sempebwa, both impressed upon me that kneeling to the Kabaka was out of respect for the crown as the institution topping the pyramid formed by the administrative and social structure that had for centuries made the kingdom unique in the whole of Africa.

Bidding the Kabaka goodbye was also taboo. You had to be very good at reading the signals when he disappeared: he might have been only going to the loo or to make a phone call when, mumbling “‘I’ll see you later”, he strolled away.

If anybody tried to take formal farewell of him, they were put off with a few vague words, which often kept them hanging about until some kind soul informed them that His Highness had gone to bed or was no longer in the palace.

Another inconvenience was that nobody, except young children, in the palace, was allowed to eat before the Kabaka had taken food and he was one of those people who can work for a full day without giving a thought to as much as a cup of tea.

The staff in his private office were used to starving. However, anybody drafted in to help, as I was more and more immediately before the independence talks got underway, suffered dehydration besides feeling weak hunger as the day wore on.

It didn’t help that a drink, usually gin and tonic was offered at the end of the working day, which could be any hour after eleven at night, when the Kabaka absently responded to Sarah’s demands that he take dinner, and the workers were allowed to go home.

I used to return to my house slightly high and unable to eat the food faithfully kept warm for me.

The most important person in the Kabaka’s household, apart from Kabaka himself and the Kabejja, was a white- headed old gentleman called Firimala.

I often wonder what happened to him when Obote’s troops shot up the Lubiri, for Firimala belonged to a by-gone age.

Like so many of his social class, meaning the rich landed gentry, as a boy, he had been sent by his family as a page at the court of Daudi Chwa II, to learn court etiquette, and risen to be the person in charge of the pages, the wine cellar and the housekeeping.

Normally, many of the pages, went on to climb the ladder leading from minor chief to Ssaza or county chief, or received government appointments.

Firimala was benign and gentle with the people of whom he approved; he guided me over many pitfalls. But, and there are no other words for it, he had it in for people whom he considered drank too much, laughed too loudly, and showed too much leg.

The taboo
A display of knee was anathema to him. He still lived in the days when to show an ankle was a punishable act.

I know just how punishable, because old Musa, the gardener of the Mukasa family, who was well into his 80s, was scarred from neck to heels as a result of the beating with elephant grass he received for running as a palace page during the infamous Mwanga’s reign and displaying his ankles and the calves of his legs.

Firimala’s form of punishment was hardly as drastic, but the expression on his face, and a certain something in his attitude towards offenders put them beyond the pale.

It was enough for others in the vicinity to curb their own lower instincts and behave quite cowardly in pretended disapproval.

We shamelessly did this because, although it may have been pure coincidence, people out of favour with that old man were seldom again seen at any private parties in the palace.

Through Firimala, I grew to know how the respective clans had adjusted their traditional court functions to the necessities of the day.

For instance, members of the Buffalo Clan, for generations the Kabaka’s personal bearers in that it was their job to carry the monarch on their shoulders on ceremonial occasions, were updated to become his chauffeurs.

Similarly, [another] clan, which was allowed to prepare his food, continued to supply the cooks in his kitchens [the Fox clan prepares the Kabaka’s food on special occasions such as coronation ].

And the Rain Clan still brought the Kabaka’s drinking water from their special well, the water from which was the exclusive right of kings.

When the Kabaka appeared on the throne, it was set on magnificent leopard and lion skins, which could only be handled by members of the Ngeye Clan.

During the Kabaka’s exile, the Ngeye Clan refused to produce the skins for Governor Cohen to stand on over while he addressed the Lukiiko, and this act of defiance resulted in the clan leader spending some time in prison.

Yet another clan were responsible for looking after Lutembe, the sacred crocodile, at the bay off Lake Victoria, while she lived.

She would come and be hand-fed when called by a member of the clan, and she was no legend: the photographer and travel writer, Cherry Kearton, who knocked about East Africa during the 20s and 30s of this century, has a picture of Lutembe in his book Cherry Kearton’s Travels (the old crocodile looks astonishingly pleasant!) and describes meeting Kabaka Daudi Chwa II, who was on his way home from a visit to Lutembe.

Prince Henry Kimera, a younger brother of the Kabaka, clearly recalls being taken as a child to Lutembe Bay and together with his sister riding on her back.

According to history, Lutembe was always so obliging. She is supposed to have been useful to Kabaka Mwanga, Mutesa’s grandfather, in disposing of his enemies.

In the 1940s, when a crocodile cropping exercise was underway, Lutembe’s affinity with mankind cost her her life. She must have provided the easiest of shots.

The clan responsible for her claimed that another tame crocodile had replaced Lutembe, but there was a big rush to introduce the royal children to the replacement.

While there were many other clan connections with the royal family and household, all of them enjoyed more significant links with the Kabakaship. Unlike most African dynasties, Buganda had no royal clan.

The Kabakas were of their mothers’ clans: Mutesa II belonged, through his mother to the Cow Clan, while his sons by the Lady Sarah, and his daughter by the Nabaeereka, belonged to the Monkey Clan, and his children by miscellaneous wives also belonged to the clans of their respective mothers; the rest of Baganda society became members of their fathers’ clans.

Because the Kabaka down through the ages took wives from practically every clan; (as a matter of fact the monkey clan was barred to them, since a monkey clan elder acted as the Kabaka’s father at the coronation, and this rendered any union with a Monkey clan member incestuous), every clan at one time or another, had blood tie in the form of princes or princesses with the Kabakaship.

Until the Christian practice of acknowledging only off-spring from an officially recognised union, many clans could hope to see one of their princes succeed to the throne.

In the rough old days, the princes themselves must have been more than anxious to succeed and not solely from political ambition; when a prince was selected to become Kabaka, the rest were put to death to save any argument.

As the embodiment of the Kiganda clan system, one of the Kabaka‘s main titles was Ssabatakka, Head of Clans, and it was in this capacity that his judgement was sought by people frustrated by the traditional judicial system or simply unable to accept a Buganda Government judge’s ruling.

Litigation was food and drink to the majority of the population, besides being a good source of entertainment to folks who had nothing better to do than pass the time in court.
Land disputes made up the bulk of the court cases, although disputed wills came a close second.

The Ham Mukasa Will was a cause celebre for years, and at the end, nobody was very sure who came out on top.

Ham Mukasa, who died at the age of nearly 100, was a Christian page at the court of Mwanga I, and managed to escape from being among the youngsters who were burnt alive for keeping their faith and their chastity, and subsequently cannonised as the Uganda Martyrs.
He lived to become one of Buganda’s greatest statesman. He outlived his first wife who produced quite a large family, then married again and had another family. Ham Mukasa died while we were still living on Rubaga Hill.

I remember passing his house, a huge, low, rambling place set back from the Rubaga Road, when word had got out that the old man was dying.

The grounds were packed with silent people, and at night the verandah was hung with lanterns.

Before the end came, the Kabaka visited. He went as an ordinary Muganda, not as a king, so there was no fuss.

The fuss came later. The Will was alleged by one side of the family to be either a forgery or altered since being reliably witnessed.

Accusations of foul play flew thick and fast. Forget what was happening on the political scene; everybody was scanning the newspapers for the latest revelation about the Ham Mukasa Will.

Practically, every family of note was involved, showing how determinedly wealth was kept through convenient marriages within the confines of the elite. A good opera script writer would have made millions out of the emerging scandals.

On the lawn outside the Old Twekobe, was a large well-built kennel with a good sized run fenced in with iron railings. The Kabaka’s pet baboon was the present occupant, but the kennel had formerly housed his leopard.

For such an intrepid hunter, the Kabaka was paradoxically a collector of exotic pets, and he was genuinely fond of them.

Besides the baboon, two buffalo calves roamed Lubiri with one of his herds of cattle. Now and again a couple of small deer could be glimpsed, and there was a horse of his which was always in the company of a bedraggled crested crane.

The baboon, however, was undoubtedly the star attraction. When it was out of the cage, it was never on a leash or chain, and occasionally it would find its way to our offices, suddenly appearing at a window and making a grab for whatever was within reach.

Its keeper patiently did his best to lure it home with pieces of fruit, and when he did manage to pick the animal up, it screeched at the top of its voice. The fault was mine, I think.

Every time I paid a daytime visit to the Old Twekobe, I used to spend some time with the baboon and feed it Vicks Lozenges, my own favourite sweets.

If I stayed away for any length of time, say while His Highness was away hunting, the poor thing came looking for me and the Vicks Lozenges.

According to Prince Henry Kimera, the leopard, a female, and two lions – a male and a female, had been the Kabaka’s favourites in the 1940s, when he was studying at Makerere University.
Personally, I find this intriguing in view of his well-known dread of cats.

The Kabaka once visited our house at a time when our cat, Cleopatra, had given birth to several kittens and mother and offspring had to be locked away before he would step inside.

However, his leopard and lions seem to have been remarkably tame and enjoyed full freedom in the palace.

The leopard in particular, travelled in the back of his car, her paws on his shoulders, as he drove himself there and back from Makerere, and all three animals were regularly fed with cake at tea time.

They were treated like domesticated dogs, in that people familiar to them could fondle them, although nobody, on the Kabaka’s orders, was to allow the leopard and lions to lick their hands.

This novel state of affairs was horribly shattered during one of Uganda’s characteristic heavy thunderstorms.

A child ran for shelter in one of the many tiny mud huts dotting the Lubiri grounds, and one of the lions chased after it.

Naturally, the child panicked and screamed, and the lion attacked, resulting in the child’s death.

It was later suggested that the keeper was lax in not confining the animal along with the other two during the storm, and that none had been fed at the usual time.

Whatever the reasons behind the tragedy, the Baganda were angry and demanded the killing of all three animals.

The Kabaka himself carried out the distressing job of leading the lions into their compound and shooting them. But he refused point blank to destroy the leopard.

She accompanied him to Britain when he continued his studies at Cambridge, and was donated to Whipsnade Zoo where she unfortunately perished in a flu epidemic.

At a guess, he might well have become an enthusiastic conservationist, as opposed to being a hunter, because his interest in wildlife extended beyond the killing.

Had somebody taught him to use a camera instead of a gun, his skills in tracking wild animals might have been put to more rewarding use.

His desire to observe them from as close as possible often gave rise to protests within certain sections of the Baganda. They accused him of taking undue risks.

Apart from that, people invited to go hunting with him saw the honour as dubious.

You had to be a James Lutaya or a Robert Ntambi, both of them avid hunters, to appreciate the trek on foot through thorny bush, the ban on smoking and use of soap for washing, and the dreary cold food; a fire for cooking, like cigarette smoke and soap, would give off an alien scent in the bush. A royal hunt was certainly no picnic.

His critics failed to understand his rare gift for immediately coming to terms with animals, and they with him. And criticism rose after it was leaked sometime in 1960 that he had taken his son, Prince Mutebi, then aged 5, on an elephant hunt.

A herd of these majestic beasts was discovered within walking distance of the Kabaka’s camp, and, unarmed, he took the child to see them.

Several members of the hunting party followed at a distance, and were horrified to see the Kabaka and his son standing about fifty feet away from the placidly grazing herd.

Some of the elephants glanced briefly in the direction of the Kabaka and Mutebi, but seemed not to mind them.

It was only after the followers drew attention to themselves that the animals grew restive, and one frightened and misguided person fired a shot which, incidentally, passed through the leg of the Kabaka’s trousers.

Consequently, there was a mad stampede of elephant, carefully by-passing the Kabaka and the small boy.

Other members of the royal family were gifted in different ways. Not so much the princesses who, even when married, spent a lot of their time congregating and chatting to each in the Old Twekobe.

But Prince Kimera qualified in Britain as a Royal Air Force pilot, and Prince Ndawula was a talented photographer working with the Uganda Information Office.

The most interesting prince of all was Prince Joseph, an uncle of the Kabaka, who always looked as though he had wandered into the palace straight from working on his farm.

His English was impeccable, despite his never having been abroad, and some of the results of the experiments carried out on his farm earned the respect of the Agriculture Department.

Among the Baganda, however, Prince Joseph was famous for his portrait of Mutesa I.

Mutesa I died in 1884, long before Prince Joseph was born, and the portrait, probably Africa’s first Identikit composite, was produced from verbal descriptions given by some of the old princesses who remembered the man.

It is said that the portrait took 15 years to complete, because the old ladies never stopped arguing over the shape of various features.

Since they must have been either dead or going senile by the time the portrait was finished, there could not have been anybody in a position to say how good a likeness it was.

SOURCE: SUNDAY MONITOR

The historical deaths that rocked Buganda Kingdom


Group portrait made at Ham Mukasa’s house in Nasuti. Without Ham Mukasa and with governor Andrew Cohen

BY G.H.K VIA UGANDANS AT HEART forum

I grew up hearing a lot about the great Baganda chiefs including this late Oweekitiibwa Ham Mukasa. His death was a real shocker to the entire Buganda Kingdom. He was a person associated with many things including the building of King’s College Buddo and the donation of huge expanses of land on which many leading institutions in Mukono are constructed. His death, before we heard it on the then Uganda Broadcasting Service, had just been brought to our notice by the Ssaza Chief ( County chief ) of Mawokota County ( Mpigi district) where at that time my late dad was the Deputy Ssaza Chief, and I was a primary school kid. So whenever the Ssaza chief returned from his safari he would stop at our place and give a brief to dad.It was on that similar occasion that we all heard him say in Luganda : Kitalo nnyo mwattu, Omukulu Ham Mukasa afudde!

Then the two chiefs together with their spouses made arrangements to attend the funeral at Namirembe Cathedral. We the children stayed behind.On their return they told us many things about what they qualified as a very triumphant funeral that assembled thousands of people and hundreds of vehicles. Africans, europeans, and Asians attended the event. And it was indeed a very historic funeral. The aggrieved Kingdom which had just celebrated Kabaka Muteesa II’s very much triumphant welcome from exile and his glorious visit to all Buganda’s counties just a couple of months earlier, continued to land in a spate of further episodes of grief with the deaths of other eminent personalities almost all in the same period ( 1956 – 1957). Buganda was very much saddened with the death of the Kabaka’s mum, Lady Irene Drussila Namaganda who passed away in a London hospital where she had been sent for treatment. Her body was brought back for burial in the compound of Namirembe Cathedral. As soon as it arrived at Entebbe it was taken to the Cathedral for the official funeral service which was attended by the Kabaka, the Governor, and other prominent personalities including religious leaders such as Bishop J. Kiwanuka (then Bishop of Masaka). It was public holiday in Buganda Kingdom but there was no classical wake that invoves an all night watch with lamentations due to the fact that the chief mourner was naturally supposed to be the Kabaka, but whom tradition bars from mourning. So things went on almost as rapidly as possible but in very deep sorrow judging by the overall reaction in the Kingdom and at the Cathedral where countless thousands assembled. the entire neighbourhood acted as a parking lot for the estimated 900 vehicles that transported mourners from all over Buganda.

“Canon Apolo, a great Native Missionary & Pigmee Elders”
Card published by East African Standard, Nairobi. Photograph by Dr. A.T. Schofield. 1930s?


Several hours after the sealed coffin had been lowered in the deep grave whose construction was still in motion some Baganda officials, eager to ascertain that the body in the coffin was that of Lady Irene Namaganda took to the formal but private opening of the coffin. And they shed away their doubts when they gazed at the body of the great Lady who was well-embalmed and well-dressed in a silk dress with the hands perfectly in white gloves. And there arose a murmur of delight for proposals to thank the British Government for this honesty!

More or less in the very same period another great lady passed away in a convent in the USA. This was the great Reverend Mother Kevin, popularly known in the entire East African region as Maama Kevina. She was a very much beloved nun who founded the leading institutions at Nkokonjeru, Nsube,Naggalama, and Nsambya Hospital and the very prestigious Mt St Mary’s College Namagunga! She also founded two religious congregations which
are very active in the region. She built a leprosy centre and a school for the blind. She died at 82 in an American convent where she had retired. She was first buried there before she was subsequently re-buried in her native Ireland. On learning the news of her death which spread like forest fire in Africa plans were made to exhume her body and bring it to Uganda for funeral at Nkokonjeru. One of the initiators of this idea was the then Katikkiro of Buganda
Mr Michael Kintu who at the time of Mother Kevin in Nkokonjeru had once been the ggombolola chief ( sub-county chief ) of the area. My late mum who was at that time a student at Nkokonjeru / Nsube told us that the first time she saw Mr Michael Kintu was when he came as ggombolola chief to visit the place. It seems Kintu was impressed by Mother Kevin’s work and personality which inspired many in the area. When the idea went through thanks to
the many contributions made, the nun’s body was exhumed in Ireland and airlifted to Entebbe. Hundreds of people had pitched camp at the airport. There were tears and crying for dep sorrow as the coffin was moved from the plane and put on an ambulance. Over 100 cars lined in procession to follow the ambulance to Nsambya cathedral where a requiem mass was held in presence of the then Protectorate Governor of Uganda and other dignitaries.

From Nsambya another procession of vehicles, three miles long, accompanied the body to Nkokonjeru Convent where thousands of people had gathered, just as they had gathered all along the route from Mukono to Nkokonjeru! The body spent the night in the Sisters’ chapel. Many OGs of the place, including my mum, held an all-night watch in the chapel. The following day, after another Requiem Mass was the official burial in the convent’s cemetery.
Tens of thousands of people from all over East Africa turned up for the great send off whose impact created a special memorable image in many minds.

In and around Nkokonjeru this nun was usually addressed as a Ssebo ( Sir ) and not as a Nnyabo ( Madam ) ! This type of address to ladies is reserved only to princesses, the Kabaka’s queen ( Nabagereka ), and the Kabaka’s mum ( the Nnamasole ). The local population had indeed elevated Mother Kevin to great heights in appreciation of her contribution to their welfare and prosperity!

Death created another shocker in the demise of a great Buganda Minister of education, Hon Mr Kassim Male, the only Moslem Minister at Mmengo at that time. The whole Kingdom regretted this Buganda statesman who was trriumphantly buried by countless thousands of people. Mr Kassim Male was later to be replaced by young politician Abubaker Mayanja who had just finished his studies at Cambridge. This appointment was a great consolation to the Kingdom as well as especially to the Moslems whom Abubaker Mayanja represented so well in Mmengo.

Death continued to take its toll and Buganda continued with the mourning. This time it was the famous Omutaka Andreya Kyemwa (82) who had been a very notable chief in the Kingdom where he was county chief on many occasions, a Lukiiko member representing Mawokota County, an adviser to the Kabaka, and finally a Regent of Buganda Kingdom appointed by Muteesa towards the end of his exile in London.Kyemwa was also a pious Catholic
who was knighted with the Papal Order of St Gregory the Great! His death was a loss both to the Kingdom and to the Catholic Church.He was a family friend and we were very proud of him! He died at Lubaga Hospital one Monday morning and his body was brought home late in the afternoon. Thousands of mourners assembled there for the two days that preceded the funeral. The day Kyemwa was buried was decreed by the Kabaka as a public day of mourning. All offices in the then Buganda government were closed. Other crowds of mourners, again in their thousands, flocked to his village to attend the burial. Vehicles rolled in from every corner of the land. Dignitaries who included Bishop Kiwanuka, the Katikkiro of Buganda and many Buganda Ministers and very many chiefs and eminet personalities were very visibly present. And of course many members of the clergy including numerous priests of the White Fathers Society to which one of his sons and heir belonged. Omutaka Kyemwa who had the honour to host the Kabaka in his home when he came to visit Mawokota county after his return from exile ( 1955 ), was mourned everywhere in Buganda. And his death was a big blow to Mawokota county where he was once a notable county chief and where he retired as a respected figure of the region.

Now Kyemwa dead and buried, death stubbornly robbed the Kingdom of the person who had been a leading active mourner at Kyemwa’s home. This was the famous Hon Mr Rafaeli Kasule, the very first Speaker of the Buganda Lukiiko, who succumbed to a strong high blood pressure at Mulago Hospital where he had been driven in agony. Rafaeli Kasule was also a native of Mawokota County and his home was near Mitala Maria township. But on his death he was buried at Ggoli village near Ggoli Catholic Parish to which he had donated a lot of land. His burial took place on a Sunday and very many people turned up. Vehicles filled the vast entire parish compounds. From his Mitala Maria ( Buwama ) home to Ggoli the late’s body was accompanied by a very long procession of cars. There was a short service in the Church before the coffin was carried by notable personalities of the Engeye clan ( his clan). The distance from the church to the burial ground was about half a kilometer. Thousands of people including Katikkiro Michael Kintu and all Mmengo Ministers, Lukiiko members, Members of the Legco, and all kinds of chiefs followed the coffin. And there was a lot of emotional scenes when the coffin was lowered in the grave. And, on behalf of the members of the Engeye clan, Rev Père Karoli Lutwama, heir to the late Omutaka Andreya Kyemwa, paid a very touching tribute to the memory of Oweekitiibwa Rafaeli Kasule.So triumphantly was indeed Buganda Lukiiko’s first Speaker buried!

Another great departure that shocked so much the whole of Buganda was that of a very heroic Lukiiko member from Masaka, Mr Ssendikwanawa who was one of the founder pillars of DP in Masaka and one of the richest persons in Buganda. He was a coffee magnate marked for his colourful generosity.My parents attended his funeral in Kabwoko township. On their return back home they described the funeral as having been a real triumph with an attendance numbering countless thousands of people and an unusually large number of cars, lorries, and buses.

Sometime later, a great Buganda chief living in Mubende Town passed away. That was the famous Mukulu Ssenkaatuuka Kiyimba who had been a notable county chief in many places in Buganda. Ssenkaatuuka had lived Kabaka Mwanga’s days and was one of those who narrowly escaped Christian martyrdom. However Ssenkaatuuka had later on to undergo castration under Mwanga’s orders and he lived this dehumanization till death at 85. He had built a near palatial bungalow near Mubende city and he was buried in that same house. His funeral was a real glorious ceremony presided over by two bishops, Archbishop J.L. Cabana of Lubaga, and Bishop Joseph Kiwanuka of Masaka. He had willed a lot of land to the Church for special projects among which was the famous Ssenkaatuuka Fund to raise sponsorship for the education of the poor!

Another death which had to be felt as a real shock was that of Mrs Mulyanti, a pragmatic lady very well known in many circles. Thousands of people including my parents attended her funeral. News of her death was also brought to the attention of my father by the Ssaza Chief who was returning from his mission in Kampala. All chiefs at that time knew very well Mwami Mulyanti who had one time been a dynamic Chief of Kyaddondo county ( the Kaggo ).
And very many chiefs from all over Buganda were at the funeral.

Forumists recalling this 1956 / 1957 period can add more names on the list of the eminent personalities Buganda lost in that period! A very sad milestone in Buganda’s history because it marked a period that cost buganda of some of her very heroic individuals.

Would Daudi Ochieng, an Acholi, have made an excellent Katikiro of Buganda?


Daudi Ochieng

By Ssekajja via UAH forum

A true Muganda nationalist, should embrace the idea of even a non-Muganda, to be presented as Katikiro of Buganda, as long as they truly subscribe to the notion of defending and promoting the interests of the Kingdom.

Would Daudi Ochieng, an Acholi, have made an excellent Katikiro of Buganda? There’s no doubt in my mind, that this non-Muganda by birth would most probably, indeed, have been a better Katikiro, than the master of cozenage, Mayiga, who is cajoling the sons and daughters of Kintu out of the land of their grandfathers.

“Bano be bamu ku baana ba Sir Edward Gavumenti ya Uganda b’eweerera, okuva ku ddyo: Omumbejja Kagere, Nassolo, Sir Edward, ne Mutebi”
From Musizi, November 1968


Mayiga, himself, once described Daudi Ochieng as a true nationalist, with good leadership qualities, who defended Buganda kingdom interests in Parliament faithfully without any fear. Try and compare that Acholi with our real born Baganda in Parliament today.

Pride is what the Bakopi benefit from Buganda kingdom right now!


BY DR.EDWARD KAYONDO VIA UAH FORUM

To me it all begins with the fact that the Kingdom is bound to loose its grip even more with the generations to come for lack of relevancy. Historically there was a reason to be part of a strong Kingdom and part of it was fear of reprisal if you didn’t support the King or the hope of getting financial gains part of which was land. Apart from Land the other main pride the bakopi have for the kingdom is the cultural practices which are also being degraded with time.

Steeping back a little I also can argue that the so called Buganda land is individually owned by different entities in the Kingdom including the royals and other powerful entities in the kingdoms, which means that the benefits a mukopi will get from Buganda re-acquiring this land are still a mystery to me.
So to me the story of Buganda land issues is a story of one of a few remaining Kingdoms in Africa, one that I am proud to be part of, a Kingdom that has its one of the two remaining valuable assets being systematically sold off to the highest bidder, a Kingdom that is now more so concerned with power and financial gain at the expense of culture and historical preservation.

The government as a leech to Buganda property was on the other side a custodian of Buganda property as many Bakopi like me tend to address these individually owned pieces of land. My main concern is that as these individuals get what belongs to them ( ironically a self defeating point to my discussion) there will be no reason why they cant turn around and sell this land to the highest bidders which most likely its going to be the rich and famous in Uganda, most likely not within the Baganda and with these legal transactions the Kingdom will find its self even much weaker and less relevant to the bakopi who are the bedrock of its existence.

Katikkiro Mayiga


We all know all men are not equal in all Kingdoms , and we all know depending on who you are the benefits are different. That’s why many baganda don’t have land while others do. Some one referred to it as those who don’t have being jealousy and another member gave an examples where squatters who included Baganda were kicked of some land.

Pride is what the Bakopi benefit, pride to be a muganda, pride to share history of once a very powerful kingdom in Africa, Pride nothing more.
Now in todays world, when one has no financial benefit their royalty is on a short and weak string. Baganda have not proved to be so royal when money gets in the mix. The kingdom has no financial incentives I know of todate to excite the bakopi in particular. So then Pride is the savior of the kingdom, unlike the past times where Kings could use threats, weapons, gifts to bring people into submission this era is a different one. That’s why the Kingdom leadership is pushing towards a Federo system for some power to control its people but this was immunized in the constitution as they are banned from holding any political position.

Now as I see it if the Kingdom take building Bugandas pride back as its main goal which will entail preservation of History and Culture they have a much better chance of strengthening the Kingdom.Now that’s where the Land issue comes in, Land is the cultural bedrock of the Kingdom, and my worry is that what is regarded as Bugandas land is disappearing at a very first rate in the middle of the night. The government as a custodian of Buganda land had a siphone on the rate of disappearance, when it gives this up, I only hope that Buganda has a plan at least where the rate of disappearance can be controlled.

I am Proud to be a Muganda, my son however cares less, he sees no relevance of the Kingdom in his life , my grandkids who will most likely be mothered by a pretty American girl will even be father away from the kingdom that’s why I have a feeling that I will be the last Muganda standing in my nuclear family.

Occasionally my theories on this forum have been wrong, and I hope and pray that this one is wrong too.

The current Buganda leaders should listen to ideas from online forums!


Mr.Enock Kiyaga is the current Kabaka Representative in Manchester and surroundings

BY DR. EDWARD KAYONDO VIA UAH

The issue with African leaders that includes those in the Kingdom is that when you bring ideas that one are competing with what they already have or two that they dont see any financial gain from in the immediate future those ideas will be dead on arrival or you will be labeled as challenging leadership.. That’s why cultural issues and that’s how I personally define Buganda ( a cultural entity because for the longest even on this forum I have asked for a definition of who a muganda is and no single person has given me any convicing answer) only exist as long as the numbers of those who practice them are enough to sustain them. Failure of Buganda to address this issue first as I explained before puts all other Buganda plans in jeopardy because its all about numbers and unlike what the Kingdom would like to depict those who care about the issues of Buganda are decreasing in number especially because very few gain from the Kingdom as it is.

I agree and we can get more than one example about ideas that sprouted from people and found their ways up the Kingdom but for sure there was some pillar within the Kingdom that worked hard on them too. But back to the cultural definition, and back to the Kanzu, when the King started putting it on it became part of our culture. Where the King goes masses follow, so if you want an idea to be big and have the full participation of all the people as a unit the gwanga mujje has to originate from the center of the kingdom.

Baganda are not short of ideas, those who are at the center of the kingdom however have their personal battles to fight and the royals as we know them also have different strategies as its survival for the fittest and scrambling for financial candies . In such a state nothing unifying can come out of the Kingdom. We also write about Buganda because we care its not complaining as such because our survival doesn’t depend on the existence of the Kingdom which takes us back to the issue of pride. Mengos full participation at any stage gives any project the legitimacy it needs and participation of all the people of Buganda.

Not so sure what Buganda development has done for ll these years, I can also point out that Buganda has a prime piece of land within the City that’s the Lubiri but for years now i am not sure what has transpired, just as an example.

It would have been good if the Kingdom is open to ideas because so many good ideas have been floating on these forums. However the mentality of the Lukiko and our King know it all complicates everything and unless they decide nothing will be done.

The main issue is that as Buganda tries to maintain its Culture and strength its leaders want to keep everything as it was longtime ago, the mentality that cultures dont change is what eventually leads to the eventual extinction of the same. I always ask my fellow baganda how the White Kanzu became the Buganda tranditional male wear and they dont want to discuss it because way back that wasnt part of our culture, but we all know how it crept in but that doesn’t matter any more because now it is.

What is next for Buganda however good the ideas we table on these forums are has its roots in the Lukiko and the Kabaka. If they so choose to open up this debate and are willing and open enough to work with the people openly and publicly on the ideas presented with a propbable chance of votiong for these changes in some way, then we all will feel part of it these changes and will work towards that.

We all know the constituion prohibits the cultural leaders from participating in political issues, but who needs a political party if you can get your cultural members to accomplish what in many cases politicians should cover? Lets say you have quarrels about markets in the city, Buganda has land, opens up several markets baganda markets, opens up several mini Bulange offices, Buys more Bus zabaganda, eventually becoming one of the largest employers of people in Buganda all within the constitution, who do you think will be the strongest political force? But as I have asked before on this forum in the current Buganda Kingdom omukopi afunilawa? Your ideas will never get to the top and there is no financial gain so what you have as a mukopi is just pride in being omuganda, and some time the force behind that pride carries you only far.

So in brief what is next for Buganda to me is the Lukiko and the King to find ways of engaging the Baganda, and its willingness to change some cultural practices that are unfitiing in this current world, changes that must come from the King him self. With this kind of engagement not only will our culture be preserved but the pride of the Baganda will have justification and participation will; increase and ideas will flow in endlessly.

Awangale Ssabasajja, magulu nyondo chu chu, abakyala bona babe ! ( okujako owange).

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