Category History

ADHOLA SAYS THAT OBOTE WAS NOT A LUMPEN AS CALLED BY MWENDA


Yoga Adhola.

Andrew Mwenda recently wrote: “Our country was handed over to persons who had grown up in grass thatched huts, shared their bedrooms with goats and chicken and who had no previous experience in leadership. When given power, they brought the worst of village habits to leadership. Botswana which got its main king, Sir Tsereste Khama, to lead it after independence bears testimony to the view that you needed grounded leaders to prosper.”

Thereafter he mourned that Kabaka Mutesa should have led the struggle for Uganda independence.

These remarks are clearly in reference to Apollo Milton Obote (RIP).

However, contrary to this opinion of Obote’s political skills, Obote has received very good reviews from people who know what they are talking about.

Ironically, the first good review came from the royal family of Buganda itself. This was in the period leading to independence. Professor Kenneth Ingham, who wrote a biography of Obote has recorded thus: “Obote’s speeches were to have repercussions in an unexpected quarter. Towards the end of the year, Obote received a telephone call from a nominated member of the legislative council, Ms Pumla Kisosonkole, the step mother of the wife of the Kabaka, inviting him to call on her in her office. When he did so she told him that a number of people had been impressed by the tenor of his arguments, among them the Kabaka himself. She thought that much might be gained if Obote were to have a private meeting with her son-in-law. Obote was excited by the prospect, but while recognising the need for a measure of secrecy at this tentative stage in the discussions, he was wary of becoming involved in any activity which might not have the approval of his party.”

More directly, Edward Mutesa was to write in his book, The Desecration of My Kingdom thus: “The opposition party (the Uganda People’s Congress always known as UPC), received more votes than DP, but secured only thirty-five seats. It was led by a man from the north named Milton Apollo Obote. At the time I had heard little of him, and certainly never met him. There were a number of stories about him.

He was said to have been a herd-boy and been wounded by a spear-throw. Deciding that life was too vigorous, he went to school, and followed that with a brief career of one year at Makerere. I do not know why he cut short his studies. A spell in Kenya as some sort of clerk under Kenyatta during the time of Mau mau came to an end, and it was on his return to Uganda that his fortunes began to mend. Up to this point his career had not been a conspicuous one. Elected to the Legco, he became the head of a powerful party, and even then I do not think his undoubted ability was recognised.”

Professor TV Sathyamurthy who wrote the encyclopaedic book on Uganda politics, Political Development in Uganda, had this to say about Obote’s political skills: “Obote’s political enemies, believed that it was a matter of time that he would return to Uganda to assume power. Despite the fact that Nyerere took great care not to be involved in Uganda politics as a partisan of Obote, Ugandan politicians knew that, in experience and organisation, Obote was unquestionably the best of them. While making sure that the interests of UPC were well represented in the UNLF, Obote had nothing to do with it personally. He was shrewd enough to realise that, within a very short time, such a heterogeneous unit was bound to hoist itself with its own petard, thus leaving the way clear for him to re-enter the Uganda political scene at the top. If ever there was a Pereto’s fox in African politics, it was Obote.”

Edward Sheehan, the New York Times correspondent who interviewed Obote in the mid 60s compared Obote’s skills to those of his colleagues, Julius Nyerere and Jomo Kenyatta in the following words: “As yet he enjoys neither the prestige nor the personal fame of East Africans other Presidents Jomo Kenyatta and Dr Julius Nyerere of Tanzania but he probably surpasses both as a tactician and as a pure political animal who posseses an almost mystical understanding of the mechanics and sources of power. He does not inspire the awe and reverence that Kenyatta’s charismatic history commands in Kenya. Nor, despite his intelligence and omnivorous reading habits, can he claim to possess the intellectual brilliance of Julius Nyerere, but then, neither is burdened with the excessive introspection, diffidence and indecisiveness which so often seem to have immobilised the President of Tanzania. “In the misty forests of Uganda’s tribal politics, however, Obote has proved himself a manoeuvrer whose foresight and cunning have invariably overturned the most ingenious stratagems of his enemies. When his political fortunes were at their lowest ebb, and just as it appeared he was losing his grip, not only did he surprise his opponents by creating the commission of inquiry, but he took the brilliant gamble that its composition was beyond his political control, free to scrutinise his personal probity as it pleased. Then he turned the attention of the country from the debate over his honesty to the controversy over his new Constitution.”

“In their repeated confrontations, Obote has consistently outwitted the Kabaka, who never really had the stomach for the power game in the first place. The Kabaka was under pressure from his own people to prove that he was running Buganda, and pushed by foolish advisers to take untenable positions from which there was no retreat.” (Edward Sheehan’s article, “Making of a President, Uganda Style,” in the New York Times issue of January 22, 1967). Another evaluation came from a contemporary who used the pseudonym, Andre de la Rue and published an article, “The Rise and Fall of Grace Ibingira,” in The New African–radical review,” published in Cape Town, March 1967. Andre de La Rue wrote: “Dr Obote, Prime Minister and now President, is an astute and exceedingly able machine politician and not a charismatic leader. He is a pragmatist and in social outlook a moderate–in African terms. Ideology is not of central concern to him; the maintenance, consolidation and use of power are. On the other hand, Dr Obote is deeply dedicated to the Uganda’s unity, social development, and economic progress.

“In political tactics, Dr Obote’s pragmatic idealism takes the form of cautious waiting and quick advances at times of his choice. He allows his opponents to muster strength, to let their aims become known, to build up internal factions within their own coalitions, to over extend themselves in grasping for power just out of reach. Meanwhile, he consolidates strength and removes minor weaknesses. At times he gives the impression of losing control over the situation. Then as rumours begin to herald his coming defeat, he moves rapidly and decisively. His immediate objective attained and the whole opposition thrown into disarray, he gains speedy adoption of major changes whose mere proposals could have cost him his office before the crisis.”

Mr Adhola is former editor-in-chief of The People newspaper and ideologue of UPC.

A LEADER FROM A PRIVILEGED BACKGROUND WOULD HAVE BEEN BETTER FOR UGANDA!


abbey


By Abbey Kibirige Semuwemba via UAH

‘I don’t think that the current crop of Baganda are taking themselves to be a superior tribe. Baganda of today even allow intermarriages which used to be rare in the past. Baganda of today are a little bit more understanding than our forefathers when it comes to issues of integration. Their only main weakness is just being too money minded, but they like integration. Baganda of today are not like Jews who are convinced that they are the Master Race, superior, god souls living amongst inferior beasts, such that Israel does not sanction or allow mixed marriages.Historically, some tribes were inferior to others and this was caused by a lot of factors: from collaboration with colonialists to just the cultural set up. In Saudi Arabia, Muhammad (SAW)’s tribe, the quraish were among the more powerful and superior tribes at the time. This claim gave the Quraish a self-righteous divine supremacy over “inferior” tribes, and that’s who the prophet managed to stay safe for a long time because the other inferior tribes could not just attack him without the blessing of the Quraish.

In Africa, some of the superior tribes enslaved other blacks to sell to the white man and these were some of the fiercest defenders of slavery when whites tried to outlaw the practice in the 19th century.

This issue of Obote and most of Uganda’s long serving leaders coming from inferior backgrounds and how it has had an impact on Uganda politics, was extensively written about by Andrew M. Mwenda before he was ‘saved’. While Andrew was more academic in his article because he did not want to step on some toes, I can categorically be honest with you that if probably Uganda had had a PM at independence from a privileged or superior background, we would probably not be in this mess. For instance, when Ben Kiwanuka was the leader in 1961, the Uganda army was kept intact as a professional army, but when Obote entered into the swing of things, he made a mess by upping the number of Langis and Acholis to be recruited in the army. This was the start of tribalism in the army. Now, Museveni is making the same mistake Obote made.’

“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze


“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze

“I would be a PhD holder now if it wasn’t for the sufferings brought by UPC government.” Mp Bakireke Nambooze
She’s 48 years now. UPC left power in 1985 when she was 16 years old.

Members,

I am really sorry if our government sabotaged MP Nambooze’s education! Exactly what did UPC do to young Nambooze? At her age, there were thousands of young Ugandans in primary and secondary schools who later proceeded to various higher institutions of learning with strong academic background attained during the time.

It is not enough to blame a regime for all problems unless there were particular issues affecting the individual or community. Can Nambooze explain how she missed her Ph.D or what has prevented her from pursuing her dreams over this 31 year period (1985-2017) the infamous UPC lost power? I see many Ugandans taking advantage of their backgrounds and the mushrooming institutions and online/distance education to graduate with higher qualifications these days, why hasn’t the legislator follow suit?

I hope it not the case of scapegoating around UPC when there are hidden problems elsewhere, or instance upstairs!

Peter Simon

I CAN’T BELIEVE THIS MURDERER IS DEAD!



BY EDWARD MULINDWA

Rurangaranga should have been thrown to the Dogs and eaten piece by piece already. This man has sat in Uganda all this long and he failed to be arrested let alone charged? And for some very unknown reason, I even thought he was dead long ago, this is a man that simply did not deserve to walk free. The man just did not have that right. Honestly who stands for his victims? Rurangaranga murdered people from a home to a home and he has lived this long without any one charging him for murder? Seriously ? Who else is still out there? And talking about the Muslims he butchered, why didn’t the Supreme council go after him, for at minimum he butchered Moslems officially? It is so appalling for we have dropped way lower than I ever expected, I thought all along that he died with the Topachos, I simply do not know how I lost the ball on this one. The brutality Rurangaranga did in Uganda, is the one that built the thesis of the death of UPC as a political party, he is the single man that murdered more Ugandans publicly than any UPC goon out there, he simply does not deserve a grave on Uganda soil. Rurangaranga actually killed more people than Nalongo that was the chairman in Katabi. By the way is that Nalongo still in Uganda too when we are at it? It is very sad that Chris Rurangaranga’s name has even popped on my screen for it brings such terrible memories on Uganda violence, and I simply cannot be alone on this one. Who else is still out there if Rurangaranga has been walking that free in Uganda !!!!!!!!

Jesus Christ.

REALITY CHECK FOR PRESIDENT ERDOGAN


mm
Friends,

It is interesting to follow how things are unfolding in Turkey. Just a few months ago Turkey’s strongman Erdogan was the bully in the region. But with European’s Union failure to honor her part of the infamous refugee crisis agreement, a coup attempt at home plus ongoing heavy crackdown on the citizens and a growing insurgency, President Erdogan does not only know whom to trust but he does not only know where to from here.

A few days ago President Erdogan did what his colleague did many months ago: visiting Moscow and ask for reassurances if not protection. The smart and yet dishonest and racist people like Netenyahu did exactly that at the dawn of Russia’s intervention in Syria. Netanyahu’s move enabled him keep the absurd Syrian war away from the Israel border while at the same time tried to annex the Golan heights.

Unfortunately, for Erdogan his realization that EU, NATO and USA are unreliable partners to his country has come a little late to save the economy and security if his country. His authoritarian and uncompromising leadership style is totally at odds with that of his partners.

We are just watching the space to see what his new found friendship with Russia’s Putin will lead to. What we know for sure is that things will never be the same in Turkey, thanks to the man who built the strong economy for Turkey and is now on course to ruin it. This is a predictable trait in all dictators. Soon or later Turkey will be looking for economic bail outs. One wonders which country will be next after Turkey. Your guess is as good as mind.

DR.IBRAHIM SENDAGILE
USA

{UAH} STATEMENT ON ENTEBBE RAID 40th ANNIVERSARY.


Top: 'President Amin shakes hands with the commandant of Entebbe Airport, Mr Kalembe, at Entebbe Airport before he commissioned the new runway.' Bottom 'General Amin and the crowd stand for the National Anthem shortly after the President arrived to commission the new runway.'

Top: ‘President Amin shakes hands with the commandant of Entebbe Airport, Mr Kalembe, at Entebbe Airport before he commissioned the new runway.’
Bottom ‘General Amin and the crowd stand for the National Anthem shortly after the President arrived to commission the new runway.’

Fellow citizens, fellow Africans.

First I would like to thank God Almighty for this opportunity to write about this difficult issue.

As the 40th anniversary of the famous Entebbe raid is being comemmorated, Ugandans are confused about the event.

Israeli Prime Minister Benyamin Netanyahu is scheduled to be in Uganda to remember his fallen elder brother who perished in Entebbe.

But with the event has come all sorts of stories about the original incident.

Interestingly all of them point at writing the raid in a manner that puts Israel as the injured hero while demonizing Field Marshal Idi Amin and also ignoring what caused the incident to occur in the first place: The plight of the Palestinians that is today being recognized by the entire international community as an illegal occupation, mistreatment, confinement, land grabbing and indiscriminate bombardment of palestinians including their women and toddlers by an ever more murderous Israeli army.

Let me warn our African youths that politics especially in the international arena, is a sad doctored game.

The western media has done such a good job in manipulating history that todays African can be found celebrating Israeli action’s.

And even when Israel mistreats African refugees, and discriminates against black jews, todays African Union has it’s mouth zipped shut and fails to write even a simple protest note.

In the days following the raid on Entebbe, the entire African continent rose to condemn the attack.

All the African Union member countries (known then as the Organization of African Unity) immediately issued a strong condemnation, and each African president sent their condolences for the soldiers who were killed.

That was the African outrage back then. And that is what the western media has managed to progressively change.

I noticed that there were several telling aspects about the hijacking and the subsequent raid that are also mysteriously missing from their narrative.

So let me try to set the record straight today.

When the plane had just been hijacked after taking off from Athen’s and heading to Paris, all Arab countries had refused the hijackers permission to land on their respective territories.

When Amin narrated to us those events, he mentioned that the Palestinian’s initial intention had been to fly to an arab country.

Uganda had not been anywhere in their plans.

All the Arabs reportedly feared that it was a fake hijacking organized by Israel to get to the Palestinian government and then send a military operation to destroy it and probably kill Yasser Arafat as well.

On June 01 2007, Israels Haaretz newspaper reported this claim saying: “Newly released British documents contain a claim by an unnamed contact that Israel’s Shin Bet security service collaborated with the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine to hijack the June 1976 flight from Israel that was diverted to Entebbe, Uganda.”

The report had been first aired by the BBC just a few days earlier.

That was what allegedly made the Arabs refuse the plane any landing permission in any Arab country.

It is only then that President Amin was contacted to solve the situation.

The dilemma he found was that the French Airbus would soon crash in the Mediterranean sea killing all passengers.

It was remaining with hardly 30 minutes fuel as it circled above the sea waiting for landing permission.

President Amin then had to first had ask Libya’s Col. Ghaddafi to approve the planes refuelling in so that it could make the 3 hour flight to Uganda.

That intervention probably saved all the hostages and crew from n.imminent plane disaster at sea.

When they finally arrived in Entebbe, the hijackers first refused to anyone to board the plane or anyone to leave.

The plane remained on the tarmac with all the passengers, the crew, and the hijackers for hours.

Idi Amin himself came to the airport and communicated to the hijackers from the control tower. He then managed to convince them to come outvof the plane and move into the old airport lounge which was now the airforce base.

He had to promise them that he would initiate their negotiations with Israeli authoritie, some of whom he knew personally when Israeli’s were training the Ugandan army until 1972 when Amin expelled them with the British.

'President Amin speaking at the commissioning of the new 10,000-ft runway at Entebbe last Monday.'

‘President Amin speaking at the commissioning of the new 10,000-ft runway at Entebbe last Monday.’


Idi Amin is the one who then ensured the hostages comfort and nourishment.

Being a serious security situation on Ugandan soil, he therefore stationed Uganda army soldiers outside the hostage crisis perimeter.

That also kept the situation inside the building in check as he didn’t want the international crisis to enter the country beyond the airport lounge.

He had hopes that the problem would go away peacefully.

Had Amin taken sides, the hostages would have probably been taken to Uganda’s Luzira maximum prison or possibly to the much dreaded State Research bureau where chances for an escape would be almost zero.

Muki ‘Moshe’ Betser, deputy commander of the Sayeret Matkal unit that led Entebbe assault, had trained Ugandan soldiers before Amin expelled the British, and the Israeli’s in 1972.

Talking about Ugandan soldiers in a recent interview with Haaretz newspaper he remarked that “When they are in THEIR wars, they fight like lions. But if it’s not their war, they can be quite indifferent.”

That was the Ugandan public opinion at the time as well on.the crisis: It wasn’t our war. And it is for the same reason that Amin kept the issue at the airport. He then worked hard to get a quick conclusion to a crisis that even him didn’t want.

That is the reality that Israeli politics doesn’t want known because in order for the Israeli action in Entebbe to be considered acceptable under international law, they had to make the false claim that Amin colluded with the hijackers.

Field Marshal Idi Amin is the one who established contact with his old Israeli acquaintances particularly Col. Barlev.

It is then that direct negotiations started between the Palestinians and the Israeli”s.

In a Voice of Uganda report, President Idi Amin clearly stated: “It was not my intention to accept them to land with the hostages in Uganda. I accepted them purely on humanitarian grounds. The hostages were even made quite comfortable. This has never happened anywhere else.”

Meanwhile, Amin would always come and chat with the hostages almost on a daily basis as he was trying to calm their fears and update them about developments.

One thing he made clear to them, the African Union, and the international community from the very beginning, was that this was a crisis between Israel and Palestinians. Not Uganda.

That is what Israel doesn’t want known.

Amin limited Uganda’s role to:

1 – Connecting the two sides to negotiate.

2 – and providing for the hostages immediate needs.

Let it also be clear that Amin’s daily visits and personal concern is what ensured that the hostages were not mistreated by their captors.

The palestinian’s feared how he might react given Amin’s courteous, casual and personal approach in his interaction’s with the hostages.

Even a deadline by the hijackers was a non-starter because then they risked antagonizing themselves directly with the much feared Amin from within his country. They knew that the Ugandan president didn’t want any further escalation or more problems happening on Ugandan soil.

He had insisted on humane treatment and provided the hostages with clean beddings and food that was brought directly from the nearby Lake Victoria Hotel, a popular 4 star government owned tourist hotel.

In fact it is Amin who managed to get the first half of hostages freed after only three days. The Palestinians had insisted that in exchange, they be allowed to bring in 4 more comrades.

Amin obliged for the sake of getting hostages freed and a quick ending.

Has anyone ever heard any recognition from Israel for that important development?

The French government did at least say thank you officially. And one french citizen even wrote to Amin a genuine ‘thank you’ letter.

20-year-old student, Miss Louise Kauvitis was one of the passengers on the hijacked airbus. She wrote: “I am deeply indebted to you for my wellbeing. If not for you, I feel I would not have survived the dramatic experience of the hijack… I hope you will regard this letter as my personal thanks. You are a great man and I am again deeply grateful to you for my being back home in Canada.”

The former french hostage honestly knew that without Amin, the crisis might have had a completely different and disastrous outcome for the hostages from the very beginning and particularly during their stay in Entebbe.

It must have been quite an experience to hear all that the international press was saying about Idi Amin, and then you finally meet the man and find him doing everything possible to make you comfortable, and most importantly trying his level best to ensure that you return home safely.

That was the reality at the time, and both the french authorities and the Israeli’s know this.

If the media was honest, they would for examplr have interviewed the French pilot, inquiring about the initial destination of the hijackers, how all arab countries refused them permission to land, how the plane came to be diverted to Entebbe, and how that was the miracle that saved them from a sure air disaster.

However by the time the crisis was over, Amin had been attacked, his soldiers killed, his jet fighter planes blown, and some people were now celebrating victory over him instead.

This is a good case study about mass manipulation and engineered news politics.

In regards to Entebbe, it must be noted that the British and the Israeli’s were already disgruntled because Amin had expelled them from Uganda 4 years earlier for exploiting the country’s economy and it’s resources.

So the Entebbe event was an opportunity to fight Amin even when he clearly wasn’t fighting them.

As the movie about the Entebbe raid was being made, the Israeli soldier who took over the operation after their commander was shot, was astonished at the inaccuracies.

He then reportedly told Israel’s Haaretz newspaper: “The only thing they got right is the scene of the Mercedes disembarking from the plane.”

When he thought about informing the movie crew about the inaccuracies, the producer one Golan, responded with a reassuring pat on the shoulder and reportedly said: “I’m going to create for you guys an Entebbe you could never have even dreamed of.”

The media in conjunction with the entertainment industry have basically created the public narrative that certain people want the world to have in order to legitimize themselves on stolen Palestinian land.

The information that public opinion reads concerning the Entebbe incident, makes it seem as if Amin was a hostage taker.

They are intentionally silent about any assistance he might have made to the Israeli hostages during that difficult time, and the sacrifices he had to make to satisfy the palestinians wishes.

I have pasted below the most pragmatic article I’ve ever come across about the Entebbe raid. It includes actual quotes from the Voice of Uganda.

Reading through it, one can see the true neutral role that Amin tried to maintain even with his known links to both Israel and the Palestinians.

It also includes the strong condemnation of the attack by the entire African Union.

In a press statement at the time, UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim considered it a “serious violation of the sovereignty of a State Member of the United Nations. An act of direct, flagrant aggression and an outright violation of the Charter, especially of Article 2, paragraph 4, which states: ‘All Members shall refrain in their international relations from the use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations.'”

Kenyan government support for the attack was yet another stab in the back from a fellow East African nation. Their evasive response when asked by the African Union about their involvement says it all about who was guilty. Kenya basically feigned knowledge of the attack when asked by fellow Africans.
(see them also in article link below).

One will also find Amin’s direct request to Israel that they compensate Uganda for the soldiers killed and the military equipment destroyed. He did this because he had been helping resolve THEIR crisis.

Even if Israel claims it had to intervene to save it’s people, Amin offered them a means to make amends by at least paying compensation for the Ugandan losses they caused.

The response he got was pure arrogance from the Israeli side. They decided to mock Amin instead.

Worse still, in an unscrupulous effort to justify their illegal action, they started the claim that Amin was an accomplice to the hijacking.

Idi Amin supported the Palestinian cause. A legitimate grievance as is being recognized by the entire international community today.

And the reason for the Entrbve crisis was that the Palestinians wanted their people freed. Their country as well.

But from the very beginning Amin had been dragged into this incident. And that is the reason why he was completely caught off guard by the assault.

He was genuinely trying his best to end the crisis peacefully and hoping to be there to see the hostages off to their original destination.

A position that he had endeavoured to explain to the African Union summit in Mauritius, and to the continent’s people at large.

And despite everything that Amin did to save the situation, they decided to carry ridicule him and shout victory over him after the raid.

The Ugandan soldier who shot Israeli Prime Minister Benyamin Netanyahu’s brother at Entebbe was Captain Rafael as we ordinarily called him. I never got to know his family name.

Contrary to what is portrayed in the movies, he shot the Israeli commander dead with one shot from his service pistol and not a sniper rifle.

Capt. Rafael was also the commander of the Ugandan soldiers guarding the hostage perimeter.

So it was literally a cowboy style face-to-face draw between the two commanders when the Israeli’s entered the building.

Captain Rafael was faster.

He was also an Israeli trained commando, the batch that had received extra paratrooper training in Greece. He then did some commando maneouvres that enabled him to literally dodge Israeli fire before jumping from the first floor balcony and escaping with Israeli’s still trying to shoot him.

He died of natural causes around 1995, and it is in his hometown of Tororo, Eastern Uganda where he was quietly laid to rest.

However in 1976 right after the burial ceremonies for the Ugandan soldiers who had died during the Entebbe incident, President Idi Amin awarded Captain Rafael with Uganda’s military cross medal.

That one clean shot which killed the Israeli commander Colonel Yonathan Netanyahu is literally the shot that saved Uganda’s honour, if not the whole of Africa’s at the time.

As an African, wouldn’t it be befitting that I lay a wreath at Captain Rafael’s grave every 4th of July?

But Uganda needs to get out of Israel’s politics where they are now inviting us to the raid’s celebrations.

There is no bigger sign of political ignorance and ideological bankruptcy than seeing a Ugandan or an African celebrating what Israeli’s did.

We here people make perfect speeches about standing shoulder to shoulder to fight terrorism. Yet we also hear that they are the same people sponsoring, arming and training groups like ISIS. We hear that they are the people plundering Africa’s minerals. We hear that they are the people providing backdoor weapons that fuel conflict in Africa. We hear that they are the people who are deporting so-called undesirable African refugees from their country to Uganda of all places.

We cannot hangout indefinitely with someone without at least inquiring what should be done so that there is peace in their neighbourhood.

The whole world today is recognizing the Palestinian state. Including the vatican last year.

Belgiu, Ireland and France are in the process of doing so, while the British parliament already voted a bill in that direction.

So why don’t Israeli’s use the travel funds and the time at the Entebbe event to sign the long-awaited peace deal with Palestinians instead.

That way maybe even the palestinians could join them in Entebbe one day to remember the conflict, and both sides could then together declare “never again”.

Let’s put aside religion for a quick second.

Nobody on this planet would like what is happening to Palestinians to happen to them.

All those claiming to value human rights yet expressly approving inhumane behaviour and the suffering it continues to cause, are the purest oppressors.

Some of them can be found complaining about far lesser infringements of their rights by their own governments, but will support untold horrors on Palestinians. How does the dictionary define such persons?

There are about 77 different UN resolutions against Israeli’s over the years. These involve unlawful attacks on its neighbors; its violations of the human rights of the Palestinians, including deportations, demolitions of homes and other devastating collective punishments; its confiscation of Palestinian land; its establishment of illegal settlements; and its refusal to abide by the UN Charter and the 1949 Fourth Geneva Convention relating to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Times of War.

In comparison there is only one resolution against Palestine; Resolution 1435 calls on the Palestinian Authority to “meet its expressed commitment to ensure that those responsible for terrorist acts are brought to justice by it”.

So if we look closer into the issue, we realize that it is all the continuous illegal actions by Israeli’s as mentioned above that are causing the resistance action mentioned in the one resolution against palestinians.

Yet the so-called Two-State solution was already contained in a UN resolution 70 years ago.

On November 29th 1947,
Resolution 181 already recommended the partition of the British Mandate for Palestine into Arab and Jewish states, and the City of Jerusalem.

Where is that partition engineered by the British, and so, which side exactly is the problem here?

It is worth noting that even this resolution was achieved without any consultation with the palestinian people.

The same thing happened when Britain first agreed to the Balfour declaration with the zionist movement back in November 1917.

There is one country, Britain that has created the mess in Palestine that continues to this day.

They have since quietly “Brexited” from shouldering their responsibility in the Isreaeli-Palestinian conflict, yet they are the direct cause for the war, the countless dead, and the countless more refugees and displaced palestinians.

We should also note that it was in 1987 that the Palestinians under Yasser Arafat finally agreed to the forced partition of their land, and also agreed to renounce terrorism. But surprisingly Israel turned around and immediately rejected that Palestinian agreement. That is basically the situation that prevails to this day.

It seems that Israel now wants terrorism to continue so that they can use the excuse to bombard the Palestinians and grab their land until they take the whole territory for themselves.

Mr. Benyamin Netanyahu and his new Defence Minister are people who have publicly stated that there will never be a Two-state solution.

But that is quite worrying if one thinks about what they’ll have to do to palestinian families in order for there to be only Israel.

It would be nothing less than genocide comparable to the holocaust.

What bombardment and mass terror will they have to instill in Palestinian populations so that they flee from their own land?

That is why such statements and the people who have said them have to be strongly condemned by all the countries, the people, and the international institutions that said “Never again” after the Rwanda genocide.

Let me remind Africans what Nelson Mandela said: “We know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians.”

It is for that reason that a couple of months ago, the Nelson Manuel Foundation and the people of South Africa sent a 6 metre tall Madiba statue that stand today in Palestine.

It was a definite show of solidarity that all Africans and all right thinking people across the world should emulate.

Last Tuesday, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon finished his farewell trip to Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories.

He used the occasion to urge some political will for a two-state solution as “the only way to meet the national aspirations of both peoples.”

On the Israeli blockade of Gaza, he said: “It suffocates its people, stifles its economy and impedes reconstruction efforts. It is collective punishment for which there must be accountability.”

The UN chief also expressed understanding for Palestinian frustration saying: “I’m aware that many Palestinians question the feasibility of reaching a just and lasting peace with Israel. They hear talk of peace but they see violence. They still live a life of checkpoints, permits, blockade, demolitions and profound economic hardships faced with growing indignities and the humiliating occupation that will soon enter its 50th year.”
Remember Gaza has been strangled by a tight blockade and its residents have witnessed three major Israeli offensives.

In 2014, more Palestinians were killed by Israel than in any other year since 1967. Violence and fatalities were at their highest since 2007.

Following the most recent Israeli war against Gaza in 2014, a UN inquiry found that Israel was responsible for striking seven official sites used by the organisation as civilian shelters.

Concerning children killed in the war, the UN Secretary General said: “I met so many of the beautiful children of Gaza. More than 500 were killed in the fighting. Many more were wounded. What did they do wrong? Being born in Gaza is not a crime.”

The number of Palestinian children killed during the 2014 war led to efforts to include the Israel Defence Forces on a UN list of serious violators of children’s rights.

As the two-year anniversary of the beginning of the 2014 Gaza war draws near, most of the 11,000 homes destroyed and 6,800 severely damaged or rendered uninhabitable remain in ruins, largely as a result of the Israeli-led blockade.

Is Mr. Netanyahu going to catch a bus to go and comemmorate that anniversary that is just a few kilometres from his home?

Meanwhile, I cannot visualize that a morally upright entity can be the target of 77 UN resolution’s for the last 70 years and still can’t abide by a single one of them.

If it was an African state I imagine the western outrage at the “unbecoming behaviour” by a pariah.

No country has reached that level of international lawlessness, flouted that many resolutions.

Neither Saddam Hussein, nor Ghaddafi, not even Polpot reached those numbers in contravention of international law.

Though I desire global stability and the predictability that Mrs Hillary Clinton represents the most between the two candidates for the next US presidency, maybe what is needed is an independent radical like Mr. Donald Trump who can break a defunct world order that happens to still be in place, and which is now increasingly perpetuating mediocrity and intentional stagnation on the Israeli-Palestinian issue.

May the souls of all who died on that day rest in eternal peace.

For God and My Country.

Signed: Hussein Lumumba Amin
Date: 04/07/2016

Kampala Uganda.

(Article “The Political Fallout From Entebbe Raid”: theeastafrican.co.ke/magazine/-/434746/619406/-/view/printVersion/-/1425iw1/-/index.html)

Amin Family Statement/Speech For Janan Luwum Memorial Day


His Excellency the President, ministers, government officials, members of the diplomatic community, the family of the late Archbishop Janan Luwum whom we remember today, Church leaders, the organizing committee, distinguished guests, fellow citizens, ladies and gentlemen.

On this day, we commemorate the first Janan Luwum day since government declared February 16th a national holiday last year.

As some might be aware, we the family of the late former president Alhajji Field Marshal Idi Amin Dada, had actually requested to the organizing committee that we be present at the memorial day function.

We are glad to have joined the rest of the country in this memorial for late former Archbishop of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Boga Zaire.
Even if it is happening 40 years later, it is important for the nation that we publicly reconcile and offer our condolences directly to the family of the late Archbishop Janan Luwum for the first time.

Our father remained silent on this matter until the end.
But we can tell you what we personally witnessed, and two incidents are central to our testimony.

First, on that fateful day 16th February 1977, we remember how our late father had just returned home to State House Kampala from the Nile Hotel meeting where the Archbishop had been publicly questioned about his involvement in armed rebellion.
Our late father then received a phone call informing him of some alarming news. He immediately drove out of the premises.
While we thought he had gone to attend to some distant emergency, a few minutes later we heard his voice again. He had actually just drove nearby to the neighboring government building.
So we went to the rear State House garden where we heard his big voice, and stood at the perimeter fence where we could see him arguing with some men outside the neighboring building below.

He was complaining that he had specifically ordered them to drive the Archbishop and the two ministers to their respective homes, then bring them back the next day for a private meeting with them. He was asking the men “What had happened?” and was furious that his last orders had not been followed.

The second event we witnessed had been about a week earlier. We had been driven to Rubaga cathedral, Kampala, where we found weapons displayed on the Church’s front lawn. We remember specifically seeing a blue truck with a false Pepsi logo that had been badly painted on its doors. The vehicle was parked next to the church.
Apparently the vehicle was being hidden there in broad daylight. The owners probably knew that security services might not suspect an empty lorry.
However the lorry had a false floor that made it look empty. And it is when the floor metal sheet was ripped open, that the weapons (Italian weapons according to the body guards) were discovered hidden beneath. As young children who were used to seeing the normal Uganda army weapons (during holidays we regularly did shooting practice plus dismounting, cleaning and remounting assault rifles) it was obvious that these were new and different. We hadn’t seen anything like them before.
The security men discussed how they had known that something was hidden at the church. But they had failed to find anything the first time they had gone to the check at the Archbishops residence. Only to discover later, and by chance, that the weapons were actually in the empty looking truck that had been parked there all along.

These are what we witnessed.
But since that day, the death of Archbishop Janan Luwum has brought grief to our late father as well, especially whenever the question arose at home.
One thing that is clear is that Amin didn’t order the Archbishops killing. On the contrary, he ordered his release.

But somebody killed the Archbishop either intentionally or was forced to. The story we heard is that he and the two ministers tried to over power the driver, one Moses Okello, so that they could then flee the country.
Only God knows the truth.

And contrary to what is usually said, Idi Amin was actually very respectful to the Church. The Archbishop had a very cordial relationship with him until that incident. Amin felt as if he had been stabbed in the back when he discovered what the Church was doing. It was shocking to him.

However it turned out later that it actually wasn’t the Church as an institution, but rebel loyalists within the Church who were preparing for armed rebellion to bring Obote back, and they had secretly used the institution. All those involved also turned out to be people fighting specifically for Obote’s cause on a sectarian/tribal basis.

In a recent Daily Monitor article, Mrs Mary Lawinyo Luwum the widow of the late Archbishop, recounted a meeting where our late father met the Archbishop a few days before his death. Amin asked a simple question: “Why was the Archbishop tarnishing his name to the western world using defamatory messages? The widow also says Amin then had a photo moment with the Archbishop to prove wrong the rumours circulating that the archbishop had been imprisoned. That was the Amin we know. Tough but always conciliatory. And this shows that right from the start, Idi Amin had no intention whatsoever of arresting the priest.
Today the rebels that the Archbishop was helping are mostly living in exile ever since their UNLA government was overthrown by the NRM on 25/01/1986.
If you hear how they talk about today’s Uganda, it is the same they were trying to do back then.

There were also high suspicions in the Amin regime that Moses Okello, the person who was last with the Archbishop and the two ministers, could have killed them intentionally.

However even the Amin government couldn’t prove it and thereby had to leave the matter where the available investigation findings concluded.

What the nation must understand is that the late Archbishop Japan Luwum’s story is one that had high political stakes for the so-called “Liberators”. The versions we read about clearly show serious disinformation at work in order to justify rebellion. They intentionally demonized our late father so that they could have a chance at ruling the country for themselves and not for the Ugandan people.
Events that happened between 1979 and 1986 prove this.
But by any standards, a truck full of weapons is a serious national security concern anywhere in the world. Today, any government would treat the Archbishop’s actions as terrorism. He wouldn’t even be invited for a chat with the president or a live interview, but might instead be immediately incarcerated in a maximum security prison comparable or worse than Guantanamo Bay.

What led to the famous public inquiry that was aired live on TV was Amin telling Ugandans and the international community to see for themselves what was going on. Transparency.
He wanted everyone to witness what had been prepared by Obote’s rebels.
At the time, our late father told Ugandans that all these weapons couldn’t be there to kill just him alone. And that it is the whole country that they were aiming at putting ablaze, and all Ugandans would suffer if they succeeded. Indeed that is what happened for a whole two decades from the day the Tanzanian forces and the Ugandan rebels marched together into the country.
Uganda Television should rebroadcast that live telecast so that todays Ugandans can see for themselves how the Archbishop pointed to Erinayo Oryema and Obote Ofumbi as his co-conspirators.

It is worth noting that prior to that, the two ministers hand’t even.been suspected in the matter and had actually come by themselves as respectable government ministers to the Nile Hotel meeting. All that changed only after they were pointed at by the Archbishop. This is in the recording.

Meanwhile in regards to our late father’s relation with the church, as president he had endeavored to treat the three major faiths equally as well. While there are claims that he had shared Indians properties with his friends and relatives, he actually didn’t have a single personal business his entire life.
Last year, we told the public how he had decreed that certain properties be given to the three major faiths: Old Kampala hilltop for Muslims, then Mapeera House land, Kampala road to the Catholic Church, and the new Church House premises, Kampala road, to the Anglican Church.

Maybe the two Churches can own up to Ugandans that Idi Amin initiated and encouraged these now beautiful towering developments in the center of Kampala?
Today, we want to help foster national healing. However it is something that is done in a reciprocal and/or multilateral way, and others also have an honesty role to play.
Today the nation can say let us never regress to the conflicts that existed, and where our country fought itself for more than four decades.
In that spirit, we would like to add our voice to the many who know that though there are still obvious challenges, we can also confirm that Uganda has largely progressed in terms of peace and stability, rule of law, economic development, democracy, and freedom of expression.

The people who purposely caused insecurity during Amin’s regime, and who have extensively confessed about their 8 year operations then, are here to celebrate the peace.

Today, we for example, have been voters since the first general elections under the 1995 constitution.
We lined up with everybody on that day in 1996 to choose Uganda’s leader. Our late father was glad that we had taken civic duties seriously.
So we salute progress as the best medicine for the country’s long term stability. It has made it possible for the Amin and Luwum families to live peacefully in the same country.

However, we call on all leaders, especially the younger generation that wasn’t actively present during the Archbishops days, or weren’t mature enough during the gruesome years that followed particularly from 1979 to 1986, to make sure that justice becomes an even bigger priority for this country.
Because we all know that justice, the rule of law and continuously rejecting impunity, is what will ultimately ensure that the country doesn’t regress to any future chaos.

For example, it was shocking for us to learn that concerning the death of the late Archbishop, even though some original video and documented records existed, none of the subsequent governments tried to organize a judicial inquiry or official forensic investigation. We wondered how can the state and the public rely on an individuals books as the official verdict yet there are designated government departments whose task is specifically to check crime?

Why hasn’t any government for example followed up Moses Okello, the last person with the Archbishop taking him home as ordered by our late father?
Also, why has one Mr. Lawoko made unscrupulous financial gain from the family’s grief? When he writes a book titled “Dungeons of Nakasero” claiming to be the last person to have seen the Archbishop alive inside a purported dungeon, also claiming that they were both incarcerated together, further alleging that Amin personally came and killed the Archbishop, yet that very day Mr. Lawoko was actually the head at Uganda Television/Radio Uganda, dispatching journalists to Nile Hotel and monitoring the live coverage.
We call that parasitic opportunism. Earning from other peoples grief.
Mr. Lawoko’s subordinate for example, veteran Radio Uganda journalist Mr. Charles Byekwaso, already publicly attested how he received his news assignments that very morning from his boss Mr. Lawoko himself at the national Radio station. We wonder has Lawoko at least made regular donations to Janan Luwum’s family from his unscrupulous earnings?

We for example, plan to make commemorative products with our late fathers picture and avail them to interested Ugandans soon. There has been huge interest for Amin memorabilia from the public.

We hereby pledge to make a donation from any earnings to the Archbishops family or community. Because we saw the sadness that his death caused to our late father. It is probably the one incident during his presidency that hurt him the most.
And it is because of that pain we saw on our late father’s face that we would also like to make the donation to a children’s charity since they are the country’s future. But we ask Mr. Lawoko to apologize to the family and the nation for his behavior.
But the important point as we look ahead is to always try and have justice served on any crime.
There also hasn’t been justice for Lubiri 1966 for example. Neither for Mukura, Luweero, Ombachi, Mbarara, and other probable serious mass crimes committed between the State and citizens by people whom most are alive and either living in Uganda or hiding abroad.

Yes, they have been increasing calls for a new independent Truth and Reconciliation Commission to review every major incident since independence.
We are surprised that criminals who unrepentantly massacred innocent peasants, have become national heroes, or are living comfortably in western countries. If one checks the names on the official list of national hero’s, one wonders if this is how they are supposed to pay for their crime in this country.
That is why there should also be the word “justice” in the Truth and Reconciliation commission’s title.

Just last week, Archbishop Desmond Tutu who headed the South African Truth Commission right after Apartheid, was expressing regret that dangerous criminals managed to walk scot-free to this day, yet the Commissions recommendations had been that punishment for serious crimes ought to be pursued by the South African government. The South African people are today questioning the relevance of that commission since Apartheid criminals are enjoying today’s multi-racial South Africa unpunished.

In that spirit, we would hereby like to make a humble request that the idea of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission be pursued vigorously to a just close for the bereaved and the country.
Also, that this important day February 16th be a day of remembrance for all who perished since independence.

This country has far so many unrecognized martyrs. People who died for the country. Some even didn’t know why they died.
We should remember them all together.
We sincerely hope that His Excellency President Yoweri Museveni, or whoever will be elected in two days, considers the matter for the sake of more peace, justice, political civility and long term stability.

Uganda today is a different place. Citizens are also called voters. This new generation of Ugandans are now choosing their own political destiny albeit with a few regrettable incidents during campaigns where we tend to regress to what looks exactly like the police state we have all heard about in the countries turbulent history.

But there has largely been tangible improvements. We once told our late father that he wouldn’t recognize Kampala with the development that the Ugandan people themselves have managed to achieve against all odds. We told him that here people say he opened their eyes.

The point is that we have long moved on together with the new generation in this country, and that is a good thing. We are therefore committed to always being with Ugandans as the country continues towards more economic growth and stability.
However it is justice that ultimately breaks the cycle of violence. We sincerely hope that the cycle hasn’t secretly grown and that another bout is possibly still coming ahead. Yesterdays incident where one citizen was shot by state agents as he supported his preferred candidate is highly regrettable and should be investigated until prosecution and punishment.

In that regard, and as we remember this country’s past, it is our constitutional duty to call upon the police and security services to cool down on national elective politics as they face civilians. As we said recently, our history should remind the state never to point guns at civilians whether during peace-keeping duty abroad or during elections at home. This is something we all need to consciously agree on as a country.

It is our constitutional duty as well to also request that the state puts in place greater guarantees that every citizen who so desires is always able to peacefully express their political views. That is another lesson from the widely circulated Archbishops legacy. Yes he took a decision against the sitting president. And that is important for any citizen to be able to continue to do peacefully.
It is days like today that should help us remember where the red line is in the actions of the state. Sadly, the Archbishop’s death was a red line that isn’t supposed to have happened.
And that is one way we can use his memory. As a guide to prevent mistakes from happening again.

We can achieve that with the memory of the late Archbishop in mind. I personally also have my own mothers memory, the late former first lady Kay Amin whose gruesome death on 14th August 1974 remains a motivating factor for me to advocate for peace and womens rights for example. Others might want to struggle for religious rights and increased political freedoms when they remember the fallen Ugandans.
In fact, one thing that could also help is that we include all the forgotten fallen Ugandans on this national day, so that as a nation we do some serious introspection to value each citizen regardless of political affiliation or the political impact of their rightful activities.

The just concluded presidential debate proved that increased political decency was just nearby yet Uganda hadn’t ever practiced it. We now realize that it brought added civility to the country’s politics. Anything that has the capacity to help us check our own political behaviors and help the citizens see political competition live with their own eyes so as to then choose from a level perspective, must be institutionalized so that we increasingly move beyond any personality cult and towards more institutionalization.

We therefore need to build on the present national consciousness that encourages constructive open debate. This might also be best served if the “Baraza” citizen’s debates are encouraged again rather than curbed as has been the case recently.
We might then be able to gain from each others ideas and thereby uplift the country’s common political consciousness.
It is a day like today where we need to remember the root causes that led to the numerous conflicts the country has experienced since independence day 9/10/1962.
The causes haven’t changed: Sectarianism, tribalism, nepotism, corruption and greed for power.
As we look at the new generation of youths living in a totally different time today compared to what the older generation has survived, it is our humble wish that the bright young men and women we see enjoying life to its fullest, including those struggling to get an education or looking for jobs, that they will live beyond war, abject poverty and darkness. Which wasn’t the case for some generations before them.
And finally, we also pray that the memory of all Ugandans who perished through the turbulent years be best served by today’s citizens gaining more peace, faith, quality education, improved health, freedom, individual rights, hard work, plus unity and reconciliation for all present and future.

For God And Our Country.

Hussein Lumumba Amin
Kampala, Uganda.

Date:16/02/2016

Do you realise unity in religious diversity here Compared to Uganda of today?


unityusa
This is a 1910 historic picture of former US president Theodore Roosevelt at Kibuga, Mengo (Kampala). Dressed in the kanzu next to Theodore is King Daudi Chwa II of Buganda Kingdom, and behind him is Katikkiro Sir Apollo Kaggwa. Prince Nuhu Mbogo of Kibuli Hill, Kampala is standing next to the nun. Behind Sir Apollo Kaggwa is Gabunga Yosiya Kasozi II, Admiral of the Navy (Empingu) and Kweeba of Ssese islands County.

Prince Nuhu Mbogo is Muslim, next to him is a catholic nun, and on the other side of President Theodore Roosevelt, King Daudi Chwa II is Anglican, his Prime Minister (Katikiiro) Sir Apollo Kaggwa is Anglican and the Kabaka’s Admiral of the Fleet Gabunga Yosiya II is also of the Anglican faith (protestants).

They say pictures tell the story but this photo shows recognition of the existence of religious and cultural diversity in Buganda Kingdom, and the Kabaka’s custom of non-discrimination on racial, ethnic or religious grounds. There freedom of worship, in the sense that by 1910, the people of Buganda had the right as applicable to belong to, enjoy, practise and profess any religion in community with others. The photo also shows a culture of tolerance, cooperation, understanding, appreciation and respect for each other’s religious beliefs, customs and traditions .

Religious harmony in Uganda was always very good until the 1970s, during the time F/Marshal Idi Amin was the President of Uganda.

In fact, the people, probably the most people of Uganda were not seriously ‘religious’, although they identified themselves with a religious denomination. This may not apply to the Moslems because for them, prayer or attending the Prayer Service at the Mosque seems to be part of their lives.

When Idi Amin, a Moslem, came to power, Uganda experienced a very large attendance of Juma Prayers at about every Mosque around the country. Not easy to mention that the Moslems enjoyed lots of favours from the government and Uganda received lots of aid from around the Moslem world.

In addition to such a ‘generous’ aid from the Moslem world, Uganda was regarded as an Islamic Nation and many people were persuaded to convert to Islam. At some point, some were even threatened to be harmed if they did not convert to Islam. To this, I may add that it was not government policy, but some high ranking government, especially military and police officers exercised this criminality and got away with it.

To such officials and many other locals who had converted to Islam, or were Moslems prior, the excitement of being a member of the Faith of Islam could as well be equated to intoxication by a very strong alcoholic beverage!

Many, especially converts behaved abnormally and at times gave an impression of either being above the Law, or being the Law themselves. They destroyed the Holy Purpose of Islam and many evil acts of the 1970s are attributed to them.

The coup d’etat that ousted President Amin also brought harm to many Moslems. But it is honestly sad to realize that even the Faithful Moslems who remained true to the Faith of Peace and Congregated in Faith and Fear of Allah, lost their lives.

Many years after, the most learned and Scholars of Islam are being killed and the killers are yet to be identified.

The Love of Religious Harmony in Uganda is not Lost. We all have to resist the propaganda of those who may wish to divide the Children of Allah.

Christian, Jew, Muslim and whatever denomination another may belong to, we are all children of Allah and all Denominations Lead to Our Father in Heven.

BJ. Rubin via the UAH forum

THE FAMOUS ABU MAYANJA QUOTES


1.Democratic government, of which I am unashamedly a supporter, cannot not be created by writing a Constitution. Ultimately, democracy does not reside in the Constitution, but in the hearts and minds of the people – Abu Mayanja, 1967.

2.In my opinion there is no justification for detention without trial. I repeat so that there is no shadow of doubt of where I stand on this. There is no justification for detention without trial – Abu Mayanja on the Emergency Powers Act, 1967

3.I consider myself to have no mandate to vote on this proposal to abolish the Kabaka in Buganda. I have no mandate to do that and I hope I shall be granted the indulgence. This is not a question of refusing loyalty or bad loyalty or anything of that kind. On conscientious grounds, I conscientiously object; it is contrary to my understanding of sense of duty and honor; my honor as a self-respecting man, having pledged myself to preserve and uphold an institution and then to come here and vote it out of existence – Abu Mayanja; on the abolition of kings.

4.I am saying that these powers used even by an angel are dangerous. Mr. speaker even God himself has not allowed himself these powers! We Muslims believe that on the day of judgment we shall be called and the angels will read out a record which will be an indictment before God, who will know – because God is Omniscient, He knows everything – He will know beforehand that Mayanja is guilty or not guilty, but God who is Omniscient on the day of judgment will get the indictment read out by an accusing angel and man will be given an opportunity to defend himself.

5.It is a habit of mind…a question of temperament of our people, the spirit of tolerance, of sharing basic beliefs and value so that there is a substantial majority of people in the country who say that “far and no further” and this can be respected. – Abu Mayanja on Democracy.

6.The key-note of the Government proposals is the concentration of all powers of government – legislative, executive, administrative and judiciary – into the central Government institutions and the subjection of those institutions to the control of one man – the President. The result is the creation – not of a republic, but of a one- man dictatorship – Abu Mayanja on the 1967 Constitution.

7.Only a law that goes against the concepts of common morality could send the editor to jail and suspend the newspapers while leaving the author of the offending article at large.” – Abu Mayanja on the imprisonment of J.W.Kiwanuka in 1956 and the subsequent ban of the Uganda Express and Uganda Post.

8.In 1986, the Minister of Information and Broadcasting banned WEEKEND DIGEST. Its editors, the late Wilson Wandera Lwande and Ndugu Dr. Jesse Mashatte were detained before being charged with sedition.

Hon Mayanja (RIP) said the paper was trying to tear the NRM broad-based government apart,. This followed a Digest story ‘COUP PLOT AGAINST NRM GOV’T FOILED’, which Hon Mayanja said was fake. 4 months later, the suspects in the story were rounded up and charged with treason but DIGEST remained banned and is the only newspaper ever to be banned by the NRM government.Subsequently, Mashatte started THE TABLET but soon after left for Britain where he is now.

9.He had another favourite Luganda one at his old age which earned him a nickname ” Nthambi” from “thighs” :”Omukasi alina bithambi nunchi nnyo!” -1991

ADD MORE QUOTES U KNOW AS WE REMEMBER ABU MAYANJA KAKYAMA(R.I.P)

UGANDA AND SO MANY OTHER AFRICAN COUNTRIES ARE STILL UNDER COLONIALISM


At the opening of Mukono Hospital (Lady Stanley Hospital).' Photograph by Dr. A.T. Schofield. 1931

At the opening of Mukono Hospital (Lady Stanley Hospital).’
Photograph by Dr. A.T. Schofield. 1931


BY HANNAH OGWAPITI VIA THE UAH FACEBOOK

Colonization is a function of power differentials (broadly conceptualized) and the desire and willingness to use such power differentials to dominate others i.e., “Libido Dominandi.” Once the power and the means are there, what remains is the political will to act. Unfortunately, there is no any indication in history that simply because people are Black Africans they are immune from this human problem or condition.

In its essence, colonization does not have to be Europe vs. Africa. Indeed, there is a whole body of literature on “internal colonialism.” Even within Africa, within African countries and within the same ethnic group, “colonization” can take place in so far as there are power differentials and the powers that be have the desire and the determination to use their power to dominate others. Such a problem is not an essentially European problem but a human problem which has manifested itself in different times and social spaces in different forms.

Across Africa, I see ruling classes using different means to mentally colonize ordinary people either on religious, ethnic or regional lines. There is nothing to suggests that educated Africans simply because they are educated are inherently immune from this kind of moral corruption that comes when power differentials and political will are combined to justify the domination of others. Indeed, many of the African elites including the educated ones have supported leaders in Africa whose policies are not aimed at liberating Africans but making them beggars , subservient and colonizing their minds to believe doing so is right because the elites come from the same ethnic and religious group, or region.

Police photo in uganda's early 1950s.Jim McGillavray is front row 3rd left

Police photo in uganda’s early 1950s.Jim McGillavray is front row 3rd left


For the African to liberate his or her continent, he or she needs to know not only the history of his or her continent but the evolution of the mindset, history and culture of others and other regions. This is particularly important in this era of globalization.Sometimes I feel that if there was serious study of Latin American development experience, Africans should have avoided some of their mistakes if they were very serious. And learning about East and Southeast Asia can make a huge difference in terms of understanding how we compare to other regions. Lee Kuan Yew was trained at Cambridge University but yet looked at the Westerners in the eye and told them that their system is not the only possible one in the world. He came up with a kind of hybrid of his own and succeeded. But one cannot do that without deep and serious knowledge and reflection. It is an easy position to take in our world today.

Nyerere’s numerous speeches and writings show that he was influenced by what he learned in the West but he did not see that as something that he would replicate in his country or Africa verbatim. He saw his country in a different light after learning about great social changes that took place in Europe.And interestingly, Paulo Freire’s conscientization approach to education clearly shows that human beings might be free but in chains.

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