Category POLITICS

WAFULA OGUTTU: OUR POSITION AS PEOPLE’S GOVERNMENT ON POLITICAL TRANSITION


This is our focus for the immediate future.
After Museveni, we must have an all inclusive Transitional Administration for at least five years within which period, we must among other undertake the following tasks :

1. Review the Constitution.

2. Rebuild and strengthen State institutions and political Parties

3. Heal the country by carrying out truth telling, justice and reconciliation

4. Organize free and fair elections as required by our Constitution.

For the elections, we propose that the three top most leaders, i.e., Head of State and Government, the Deputy President and Prime Minister must agree publicly and sign it off accordingly that they will not contest for any elective public office in the general elections organized by the Transitional Administration.

Wafula Phillip Oguttu,
Minister for the Presidency,
The People’s Government.

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Accepting money/gifts from people and organisations we cover


By Edris Kiggundu

Journalism ethics world over stipulate in BLACK and WHITE that journalists are not supposed to accept any gifts/money/facilitation from the people or organisations that they cover. The genuine fear is that this money/gifts will compromise the journalists who may not be able to deeply scrutinise the activities of these people/organisations.

To a large extent, I agree with this assertion. What defines people is their reputation and for journalists, the standards are higher. You cannot be the one pointing out how corrupt some public officials are,when you are stuffing your pockets with money left, right and centre. Your reputation will take a hit and few people, including the organisations/people that give you money, will take you seriously.

Yet having stated that, we must also place into context the situations under which some journalists accept money or gift from people and organisations they cover. Here, I am being a REALIST not IDEALIST. I once asked a respected senior journalist what, in his view, constituted a bribe from a news source?

After a long pause, the award-winning journalist told me that “you can know that a news source is trying to influence your coverage of a story through offers of money/gifts. It is an instinctive feeling… But there are people/organisations that could give you money out of appreciation for what you have done. That may not constitute bribery.” That was the view of
the senior journalist who us still active and occupies a very senior position in one of the most influential media houses in Uganda. He is also one of my mentors.

In countries like Uganda where you cannot easily divorce journalism practice from the social and political context, the issue of taking/receiving money from people/organisations must be looked at from many angles. Journalists become susceptible to bribes the moment their organisations neglect to facilitate them or pay them well. Many journalists who work for local FM stations in Uganda fall in this category. Some organisations cannot afford to facilitate their journalists to cover basic functions and organisations will step in. Some news organisations simply don’t make money (In the TV Broadcast industry only three TV stations in Uganda turn in a profit). In other cases proprietors of some of these media organisations are only business oriented with little regard for funding journalism. Thirdly, some stories in Uganda cannot be covered without some form of facilitation from the interested organisation/news source. They may involve huge expenses and risks. Take election coverage for instance.

Have I taken money/gifts on some occasions from people or organisations that I have covered? Yes I have. I even pointed this out in one of the posts here last week. I have attended workshops and trainings where per-diem is offered and I have pocketed it. I have also been “appreciated” several times for the stories I have covered by people I know. I have accepted facilitation and taken the ambiguous “transport refund” from FDC, NRM, UPC and DP, including food and refreshments at their functions. I have been facilitated by organisations within and outside Uganda in the course of my work. The UPDF once flew me and other senior journalists to cover floods in Soroti. They in addition “refunded our transport”. The US State Department facilitated me generously to attend a journalism fellowship at the University of Southern California in 2006. I came back with some good money which I never declared to my editors at the The Observer. The UK government/Reuters facilitated me to cover UK elections in 2015. One NGO met my bills for a trip to South Africa in 2011. The Turkish government funded me and other journalist for a benchmarking trip. I have also been handsomely paid as a facilitator by some organisations to train their people in media related matters. I have also given money/gifts to some of the news sources to obviously buy their favour ( I once gave fuel to an MP…a story for another day). This, many media analysts will tell you, is also wrong. One thing I have never done is to extort money/ put someone at gunpoint from a person/news source/organisation under the threat: If you do not give me this..I will do this..” I don’t think these facilitations/appreciations have influenced the way I cover these organisations and people. But this may not be for me to judge. Like I said, in countries like Uganda, the issue of what constitutes bribery is thorny and divides debate. I have seen editors chastise reporters for accepting 20K (a pittance really) as transport refund from an organisation, as they accept gifts and gift hampers worth millions from the same organisations. I have also seen some senior news managers fight juniors for foreign trips funded by private organisations, simply because there is some monetary benefit. I have also seen and witnessed situations were some editors have sat on stories simply because they hit out at people/organisations that regularly fund them. I have seen news organisations drop stories in exchange for adverts from an organisation which is being scrutinised (which I think is a direct form of bribery clothed as a business transaction). The managers are quick to retort that “these are the people who pay your salaries.” In short the practice of accepting money/gifts and other forms of facilitation by journalists and media organisations is rife in Uganda and elsewhere. This is not about to end. In my view individual journalists have the responsibility to exercise sound judgement in situations where they think they are being compromised by a news source/ organisation and act accordingly.

No KB supporter is in prison who is not under the care of Besigye


By Ronald Muhinda, FDC supporter,
No one is in prison who is not under the care of Besigye. He provides with lawyers, supports their families etc. I can assure you that it’s well known where Mugumya Sam and others are, their condition in Ndolo Military Prison and there is direct contact with them for years. They also receive monthly financial support of $500-1,000 to take of their basic needs in prison.

Mugumya and others will be freed without making any compromise with Museveni. Those methods of compromising with Museveni are a preserve of DP members. I am telling you this so you can stop this blackmail against Besigye. What he goes through to keep even your DP members afloat is unimaginable.

In 2016, they were saying Museveni looks at Besigye as very vengeful and therefore will not hand over power him in fear of retribution foe all Museveni has done to him.

So they proposed Museveni can only hand over to Mbabazi or Muntu. No when Museveni didn’t hand over to them, the narrative has changed to Besigye and Museveni are the same.

When journalists came to the rescue of Balaam Barugahara


By Edris Kiggundu of the Observer

*When journalists came to the rescue of Balaam Barugahara*

Political campaigns are some of the most hectic events not only for the candidates but also the hordes of journalists who trail these candidates. Personally, I have covered three presidential campaigns (2006, 2011 and 2016). In 2006 and 2011, I trailed Dr Kizza Besigye for The Observer. In 2016, I covered President Museveni for the same newspaper. In all those campaigns, I moved with the candidates virtually every inch and space of this country. The most eventful campaign for me was that of 2006 when Dr Besigye, fresh from South Africa, took the country by storm. His rallies were ecstatic but were also filled with tension given the kind of challenge he had put up against the incumbent, Yoweri Museveni. Every now and then at his numerous rallies, there would be shouts of “spy, spy” from his supporters especially when they saw unfamiliar faces in the crowd. One day while campaigning in Busoga, my friend Balaam Barugahara was identified as a “Museveni spy” by some FDC youths. Balaam, still largely unknown then, had hitched a ride in the press van with a number of journalists including this columnist. He told us he was a genuine supporter of Dr Besigye and wanted to find ways of promoting him. In fact on several occasions, he tried to seek audience with KB through his aide Sam Mugumya but he had not been successful. So back to that day, a group of youths chased Balaam from a rally, ready to lynch him. He quickly found his way into the Press Van as the angry youth bayed for his blood outside. When he entered the van, Hussein Bogere, a senior journalist from Daily Monitor and I immediately shielded him (Some FDC youth then including the current Makindye East MP, Ibrahim Kasozi, never forgave me for this). As the van made its way from the rally, I practically sat on Balaam until after a safe distance of about 2 KM. Never the person to give up, Balaam returned to the campaign (something I thought was suicidal) and soon, he was manning Besigye’s car with Mugumya. They would guard the car in turns. Today, the fortunes of the two have changed. Mugumya is incarcerated in jail in DR Congo, while Balaam Barugahara, is a budding young millionaire and proud supporter of the NRM. I still don’t believe that back in 2006 Balaam was a Museveni mole. Until up to around 2011, I think he was a genuine Besigye’s supporter but as his business profile grew and realised that to make it bigger you had to be in the good books of government, he made a strategic decision to support NRM, which controls the state coffers. That was entirely his personal choice, which I respect.

JOURNALIST KIGGUNDU’S ASSESSMENT OF BESIGYE


By Edris Kigundu,
Throughout my journalism career, one question I have constantly encountered from colleagues and other people concerns my political inclination. Which political party do you support? I have been asked.
Many people have said I support FDC. Others, have broadly classified me as an opposition supporter. I have also met some opposition supporters and friends who suspect that I support NRM. Once during an internal NRM meeting called to design a media strategy for the 2016 elections, a senior party official was asked “why she often defends Kiggundu” against the charge that he is an FDC supporter.” The senior member, obviously leaked to me this info.

The truth is that having worked for a relatively independent media house for a long time (The Observer), my political views have been shaped largely by what I have seen and covered. I have covered more stories on local politics and its injustices suffered mainly by the opposition (including violent demos). This also means that there are more people on the opposition side that I freely associate with than those on the side of the NRM. This means that I am far from being considered an objective person. I am not because my views are tinted with a certain bias. I however try to be fair. In the opposition I have a soft spot for…some of you have guessed right… Dr Kizza Besigye, the former FDC leader. I have seen him at some of his lowest and highest moments and I have seen many people who have made conclusions about his personality without really understanding him well. I have interviewed him more than 10 times (and he can be a handful for an unprepared journalist). I have also held private conversations with him countless times on a wide range of issues. He is one of the few people I know who reads widely in fact, more than many academics I know. He is very cerebral and very organised in the way he approaches issues. He keeps time to a hilt and will call early to apologise if he cannot make it in time for an appointment. He is also literally a moving ATM machine and has contributed to so many causes (tuition, cars for officials, houses, funded journalists). Being an opposition leader certainly comes with many responsibilities. That said, Besigye is not perfect. He has a million and one weaknesses, like all of us. He can be intolerant to divergent views and I know some party officials who have been on the receiving end of his tirades in internal meetings. Even journalists or media houses he perceives to be critical of him have not been spared either. Then he has the habit of denying, sometimes shockingly, what he has said using the common refrain: “I was quoted out of context.”

I remember the U-turn in 2015 over contesting in the elections and The Nile Post interview when he downplayed Bobi Wine’s presidential chances. Lastly, having “fought” and “sacrificed” heavily for political freedom over the last 20 years, he believes he is entitled to “his territory” will not treat whoever tries to encroach on it lightly. That is my personal reading of his current tension with Bobi Wine. He thinks people should be appreciative of what he has done and accord him the respect he deserves. Overall, I rate Besigye very highly compared to the calibre of politicians we have on either side on the political aisle. He is extremely intelligent and has a high degree of integrity. I think he (and Gen Muntu) could be the most genuine opposition politicians I have encountered in my career. But I am not blind to some of his personal weaknesses (and those of his ardent supporters).

I think President Museveni must be laughing his head off


Bobi Wine


By Edris Kiggundu, The Nile Post Journalist

I have heard supporters of one of the presidential hopefuls echo his call for people to go and register for national IDs ahead of the election. Mbu, this will guarantee that they will vote come 2021 and remove Museveni. I think President Museveni must be laughing his head off. So someone thinks with a mere ID, he can remove Museveni’s government which designed the national ID system, controls the data base and can still change rules of engagement at the last minute? Some of these gullible fellows have never found out why voting materials in parts of Kampala and Wakiso could not be delivered in time at the respective polling stations. The same fellows think one will just flash a national ID in the faces of the polling officials, vote and bang! Museveni will be history. If that is their main election strategy then the son of Kaguta still has many years at the helm of this country without breaking much sweat.

M7’s son will salute any president in Uganda!


Patrick Kamara: Do you think General Muhozi would salute you if you won the 2021 elections?

Hon.Kyagulanyi: The difference between us is that you live in the past while I am working for the future where the military is subordinate to civilian authority

I suppose you know it; in the army there is a code of conduct that compels every member of the force to do what he/she is expected to do. A junior officer will respect the senior, and the simplest of such expectations is greeting, “saluting”.

So if Gen. Muhoosi is a real soldier, he will obediently and professionally do what is expected of him; and he will also know the penalty for doing otherwise, insubordination which can have all sorts of interpretations, which will be very bad for him.

Interestingly enough, a junior who salutes his senior and his greeting not returned, can report the matter to a more senior officer and the erring officer will likely be reprimanded, but they are usually smart – they pretend not to have seen the small man, as they know the repercussions, and the effect on morale of the force.

Gen. Muhoosi will salute any president in Uganda, Kamara whether elected or usurps power, his salute from Gen. Muhoozi is guaranteed!

Peter Simon

HOW DR. SSEMOGERERE WAS FORCEFULLY EJECTED OUT OF ACTIVE POLITICS


PAUL KAWANGA SSEMOGERERE

By Hon BETTY Namboze.

In 1996, Dr.Kawanga Ssemogerere who was the First Deputy Prime Minister in Museveni’s Government pulled off a very smart move when he resigned and struck an alliance with Politicians who hail from Northern Uganda. They formed a Political vehicle IPFC that greatly unsettled the regime which henceto had enjoyed unchallenged power.

This move ushered in an astonishing sudden mental and emotional disturbance to the person of Museveni. This was the first adult suffrage election that Museveni ever faced while in Power. Indeed the voting was organised in makeshift shades with black polythene materials and it was greatly rigged through ballot stuffing.

1980 elections


Ugandans came to know about this ballot stuffing when it was made public after the bitter quarrel between Kafumbe Mukama and Francis Babu who had both vied for the Kampala Central Member of Parliament seat. Then one of them let the cat out of the bag and revealed that indeed ballot stuffing was the key business in the makeshift kaveera shade.

After the elections, Museveni was up in task to break the Ssemogerere-Cecilia Ogwal led political alliance. An agitation was instigated in the Northern Uganda to blame their Baganda allies for failure to vote for Ssemogerere 100 percent. In Buganda, another agitation was instigated to blame Ssemogerere for allying with the Obote who “killed Muteesa and that he wanted to come back and ban the Kabakaship”.

These agitations were made to kill the alliance that had joined the Northern part of Uganda and Baganda region.

The fact of the matter was that Cecilia Ogwal wasn’t working for the return of Obote because, from exile Obote had decreed that UPC shouldn’t participate in a Museveni organised election. Cecilia Ogwal and the Northern Uganda politicians had defied Obote. On the other hand, the Baganda especially the youth had voted for Ssemogerere because of their strong DP ties. Museveni under a strategists team that was reportedly led by Bidandi Ssali had rigged elections heavily in Buganda to fit into the narrative that Baganda couldn’t vote Ssemogerere who had allied with the Northerners because they hated them naturally.

Soon after the elections, another agitation cropped up in the now semj-structured opposition, the opposition and majorly the youth were “tired of Ssemogerere and they now wanted a more youthful leader and candidate”. The youth in the opposition declared a war of generations, the old men and women had to retire and give way to the youth. The focus shifted from fighting Museveni to fighting for supremacy in opposition.

In DP Bwengye led a rebellion and appointed his own NEC with the help of the DP secretary general Drametu who was deputised in that faction by Lulume Bayigga. It was around the same time that the Uganda Young Democrats who included Micheal Mabikke among others came up with a Super star and Popular Candidate in the names of Nasser Ssebaggala.

To be continued

Police should’ve kept Nalufenya to deal with Kondoism and criminals


By WBK in USA

The police chief needs to change strategy. He does not have to speak to the media about his tactics. If I were in his shoes, I would have police officers ride boda boda. I would have women police officers walk the streets at night in pairs and within walking distance of each other to lure those goons. I would flood the city with plain cloth police officers. I would also put up CCTV cameras with the capacity to see activities 20 miles outside of Kampala’s roads. I would flood criminally prone areas with police crushers for deterrence and plain cloth for intelligence gathering and penetration of criminal gangs. I would keep an eye on some bikomera/fenced areas and garages 24/7.

And those CCTV cameras would be manned 24/7 by police officers. I would not also destroy for the sake of it what general Kayihura put in place. For example, I would keep Nalufenya, yes to deal with Kondoism and criminals.

The IGP cannot try to appease criminals. No. Fagiya by any means necessary. He should instruct police officers to try and take criminals alive so instead of shooting to kill, shoot to immobilize be it cars and legs. But if the thugs shot back,, deal with them kabisa. He must give armed police offices bullet proof vests. And Ugandans must see those criminals mowed down by unsuspecting police officers.

The IGP cannot act easy. Kondoism is back so the police must be prepared for the long haul. They need a tough talking, fair and professional IGP not some nice pleasing police chief. The last thing Ugandans needs to se is any hint of sympathy for criminals. Police must pray physiological war on criminals, suspected criminals and their allies. Tell them that police knows what is going on and if they continue they will be dealt with kabisa.

Incidentally, it is the poor who at victimized most by crime. really? yes/ How? They live in criminal prone neighbourhoods or estates.

The Ugandan police ought to do what credible police units to do. Not need to rush to cut off criminals. Let me explain. The police/intelligence may reveal that so and so of place B are involved in crime. They observe without striking. for example, if police has information that X is the leaders of certain criminals activities, police may observes those criminal activities and let X develop the mentality that he is untouchable. This is a proven police tactic. Yes some victims may get injured or sadly hurt. That is the price of successful policing especially with certain criminal acts.

Police in Uganda should adopt the tactics deployed by fishermen. They never rush to go after the first fish to appear at night. They satyr back and wait. Usually their patience gets rewarded with better harvests. In street parlance, police must embrace the “bugu bugu ssi muliro” /maxmium heat is not necessarily the best way.

In plain English, police may see X committing a crime and look the other way . Why? They need to see more of X in action. They need to see his allies and so on. Police would know X’s exact location but nit strike right away. Once it has collected enough information through surveillance and other tactics, it would have a lot more information about X’s activities, his allies. hide outs etc. Then it would strike with a lot of success.

It is terrible police to act prematurely and drive other criminal elements into hiding.

Finally, remember any crime is possible because of opportunity. Ugandans must do a lot more to minimize those opportunities for criminals. In plain English, take precautions as much as possible.

HUSSEIN KYANJO: A POLITICAL TRAILBLAZER ”POISONED” BUT NOT KILLED!


Hussein Kyanjo eyaliko MP wa Makindye West


By Muzinyabigere Huza via UAH Facebook group

I take time off from Museveni’s lies to business people in the Kampala commercial district to look at a man who created this struggle. Many young activists and opposition players think the world began a fortnight ago but we have real Generals of the Struggle who deserve respect to the meaning of the term.

Uganda first experienced Hussein Siliman Zirabamuzaale Jakan Kyanjo in the late 80s and early 90s at Nakasero Tabligh mosque. He was actually delegated by the then Amiru Dawra Shk. Kamoga as the news anchor for Muslims. His role was to seek for vital news around town and actually inside Islam in Uganda and around the world and give it to the Muslims at his prayer mosque. His day was Monday. Muslims could travel all around Kampala to listen to this talented young boy of eloquence. Everyone was so surprised of how he could collect such vital information just in a week. He was the only boy then in the city who talked boldly against Museveni’s mistakes. Remember by this time, Museveni was Uganda’s sweetheart. But while Ugandans were still celebrating Museveni and the liberators, and while they were still lamenting and cursing the past regimes especially Obote and Amin Kyanjo was already on the podium warning them against this regime. Only for Ugandans to witness after over 20 years that Hussein Kyanjo was worthy their attention.

Eloquent, bold, clever, small size and resilient had opened up a Private design and Printing Company which he named Siphon Arts Ltd in kampala and the best at the time after his graduation at Makerere in 1986. He was the only graduate in his year who never sought employment giving him both freedom of thought and association. I don’t know why these boys who grew up in those big Islamic families are so aggressive! Kyanjo was already married in two years after his graduation, bought a private car, built a home and performed Hijja in Makkah and Madina. He was a lucky hustler since teenage.

My favorite politician caressed the ears of Ugandans after the introduction of political shows on Ugandan private radios ( Ebimeeza). I remember the most popular was that of CBS which my late mother never missed. Everyone could talk but Kyanjo could talk! Everyone was surprised how this boy survived Museveni’s prisons. Here is the reason: He never talked about anything until he had proof that it was perfectly right. He joined public politics in 1996 after they had registered a party with the likes of Muhammad Kibirige Mayanja, Imaam Kasozi, Omar Kalinge-Nnyago and others. The party name was Justice Forum commonly known as #Jeema a short form for Justice,Education,Economic Revitalisation,Morality and Africa Unity. The name Jeema stands for the party well thought of manifesto. He was the chairman of Kibirige Mayanja’s presidential campaign of 1996 which position he held best as compared to all taskforce chairpersons. His role was too perfect that he was identified by the American election observers as the best and consequently he was invited by the American Council of Young Political Leaders(ACYPL) to participate in the electoral observation that saw Bill Clinton return to office for his second and final term in 1998. While there, he underwent special practical tutorials for leadership but most especially self administration. No wonder he is one of the most humble but resilient legislators Uganda has gotten. Most of you began following him in 2001 when he contested with the Late Hon. Yusuf Nsambu for Makindye parliamentary Seat. He lost. He was so respectful that he has no record whether during campaigns or after his loss of attacking his opponent as we witness today’s madness. I remember his loss hurt many people even those outside his party. Ssemujju Nganda who was by then not in politics but writing at Daily Monitor says: “I hurt on the news of Kyanjo’s loss to the extent that I broke to tears. It hurt me more than I’d hurt me to lose my own contest…”! That’s the position of Kyanjo in the hearts of Ugandans. He still participated in all events of the struggle and his voice weighed more than a truck full of sand.

No one knows who taught and how Hussein learned this eloquence. The way he selects his words, his calmness and poise won the hearts of many and made him earn the respect of even those in the government he was fighting except two as we shall unmask them later. Maybe he got this wisdom from Ntuuma Primary school a school on his birth village Ntuuma in Bukomansimbi where he was born on Sunday 20th November 1960 to Hajj Siliman Zirabamuzaale Jakana and Hajjat Nabuuma Mariam? Who between the two parents was this clever!? Omusajja mugezi! Or did he get the wisdom from Bwaise Islamic primary school, Mbuulire P/S or Kako P/S where he sat for his PLE in 1975? I’m soon investigating this Masaka S.S where he went for secondary in 1976 because every old Student of theirs I have met is an outstanding personality!

So our man of the day stood again in 2006 and won the mp seat which he served for two terms. He’s a federalist in great love with his Kabaka. He is the vice chairman deputising Mp Bakireke Nambooze on kabaka’s Buganda Civic Committee that was instated by the King himself in 2007 when Museveni moved to enact laws meant to grab land from Ugandans through law. This one is not the first attempt. Museveni put a team headed by one of his cheap ministers Kinobe to move allover Uganda sensitising Ugandans on the need for the government to be the sole owner of land in Uganda, the Kabaka instated his team too and the Kabaka won this war. The front Generals were Hussein Kyanjo and Nambooze. After that war, in 2008 Museveni moved to give away our Mabira Forest to the Indian investor Mehta to use the land for cane growing. It was Kyanjo and the Kitgum District woman Mp when she was still Pro-People Beatrice Anywar who moved to save the forest. With the support of the people and Buganda kingdom, they organised the first of its kind People’s Demonstration against Mabira give away. Thousands thronged the streets in their support, people were injured and some died due to police’s naughty behaviour. Both of them were arrested. Kyanjo was bailed out by his wife and son. After the awakening of Ugandans, and after the whole country said no, Museveni gave up his plans as then. But later, go tour Mabira!
Kyanjo had become a factor in Uganda and most worryingly in the hearts of Ugandans. In 2010, he had been elected in his party as the party’s presidential flag bearer but rallied behind the opposition gladiator Col. Kizza-Besigye Wrn in the then loose Inter Party Coalition (IPC) which was not only fought by the Despot but also fellow opposition personalities like Abed Bwanika and Norbert Mao. In Parliament he influenced many people from the speaker to the guards. His debates are the most memorable on the Hansard.

An articulate lawmaker, a rabble-rouser, a sobre leader, a Buganda kingdom enthusiast and staunch Muslim and a sheikh.Rummaging through the records of Parliament, Kyanjo’s name appears prominently in The Hansard. And he was not only exemplary in debate but conduct too. Kyanjo was so disciplined and committed to whatever he does that he keeps time and rarely missed the plenary and parliamentary committee debates where his contribution was well documented.

It was, therefore, not surprising when the African Leadership Institute (AFLI) scorecard placed him amongst the top ten best performing lawmakers. Although on opposition, Kyanjo was the most respected MP during his tenure.

Once in a while he got agitated and unleashed his acerbic tongue. For instance, at the peak of the central government and Buganda attrition in September 2009, after violence erupted in Buganda following the government refusal of the Kabaka to tour Kayunga district, Kyanjo boldly suggested that Mengo, the seat of the kingdom, should secede from Uganda which I supported to date.

Yet Kyanjo is one man who is always ready and willing to reach out across the political aisle and make political compromises. Even after a heated debate, Kyanjo could be seen chatting up a minister, trying to put his point across and mend fences. After Dr Kizza Besigye, the FDC leader, was incessantly sprayed with pepper as security officers brutally arrested him in 2011, emotions ran high in the House. Daudi Migereko, the then government Chief Whip, revealed that he sought Kyanjo’s counsel as to how to handle the highly emotional debate.

“We had spent a lot of time bickering over the video and he advised the House on how to move,” said Migereko.

The Kigulu South MP, Milton Muwuma, who chaired the Internal Affairs and Defence committee, observed that Kyanjo’s sobre views often came in handy to give the committee direction.

“The committee had always been persuaded to follow his objective views despite being an opposition member,” Muwuma said. In cases of a sharp disagreement, Kyanjo’s pacifist nature is often called upon to suggest a way forward.

“He advised and guided the committee,” Muwuma told The Observer in 2012.

The Bukooli Island MP, Peter Okeyoh, another colleague on the committee, agreed with Muwuma, adding that Kyanjo is reliable and thorough.
“He is someone who brings every detail to the attention of the committee,” he said. This kind of influence didn’t go down well for Kyanjo, he was a threat to the junta and their communist plans. He was seen as a person who’d slowly change the house’s opinion at the expense of the despost. The plan against him was hatched:

In October 2011, while investigating the [oil] bribery allegations something bad happened to his life. He was the chairman of the investigations team that was pressing who pulled what from the Oil deal. The scheme was so deadly that his friends and colleagues began warning him of the thought danger to his life.
Kyanjo, says he had travelled to Johannesburg South Africa for Parliament business in early 2011 when two days into the trip, he woke up to realise he was struggling to speak.

“I started feeling something in my tongue and I was failing in my speech. I thought it was something small. I had gone to South Africa with Patrick Amuriat Oboi now Party President for FDC who represented Kumi County in Parliament then. I couldn’t speak well and I thought it was something small that could be fixed easily by a doctor on return home.

I went to see the doctor but he could not identify what my problem was. I had some missing teeth and I thought it was one of the problems, but when I went for that (check), it was not part of the problem until I went to an Iranian-owned hospital in Dubai. There, they diagnosed me with a disease called Dystonia.

They said it was a rare stubborn disease; it resists drugs and is very disturbing to one who has it. They gave me some drugs which I started using but also referred me to a London hospital where they said it was going to be better for me.

So, when I returned, I went to the Speaker and explained to her my ordeal and she gave me a go ahead and Parliament sponsored me to go to the University Hospital of London where I was getting treatment for the last two and a half years.”

Kyanjo says he traveled to London every three months from 2012 to get two toxin injections on the lower part of his jaws to keep the muscles in shape.

Kyanjo says doctors told him his condition could have been caused by any of three factors, an inheritance of the disease, effects of a serious accident or poison.

“I checked and found I could not have inherited it because no one has suffered from such a disease in our family. It also cannot have been caused by an accident because I have never been involved in any. So, I was left with one possibility—poisoning.”
Kyanjo says during a typical attack, he keeps fighting not to swallow his tongue….
Swallow his tongue, I said; swallow his tongue! He was pressed with a battery inside his chest. That battery he charges with another that he fixes in a socket for him to talk every after three months!

So he was poisoned to kill his influence. He was poisoned because he insisted on righting the wrongs of his country. He was poisoned for fighting graft and corruption. He was poisoned for not accepting a position in the junta government after their many trials. He was poisoned because he was a diehard #Besigyevite. He was poisoned because Ugandans believed and trusted him. He was poisoned because he was intuitive. He was poisoned because he’s a federalist. He was poisoned because of you and me. Such are the people who owe us respect. They gave their lives for the struggle we are wasting. Even though he is under such conditions he has refused Museveni’s money. He still stands for what he stood for while still alive. He stands with Kizza-Besigye in all these. He stands for the struggle. He is one reason I can’t forgive the regime. However he says; “You should be happy and grateful to Allah because am not the same but am alive thats why you can reach me. My wife and Afande Kirumira who died a month ago can’t be consulted for any thing”.

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